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 Post subject: Wow is all I can say...
PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 8:00 pm 
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I am from the school of thought that knowledge is power. I realized that for some people Suboxone may seem like a controversial drug but I had no idea how strongly people would react in the real world. I am shocked by some of the reactions I am getting in the addiction community regarding choices we are making together as a family. My feelings have been seriously hurt by some of the outbursts I have heard from people.

I would never judge a person on their recovery plan, why would anyone think it is ok to tell me I am making a bad decision letting my child take Suboxone? What the hell? I am not telling them they have to choose the same path. Most of the people who have said the nastiest things were the least knowledgeable on the subject! If I am going to argue about something I better damn well no what I am talking about. It is insulting to tell someone they are making a bad decision when the only thing they know about the drug is it's like Methedone? WTF? Read before you make stupid statements.

The worst comment was from a lady who had an almost 17 year old son who has relapsed many times and has begged to be put on Suboxone. She said no way in hell she would let him take that stuff so he can be a new addict to a new drug. I feel so bad for that child. She feels no obligation to listen to his plea's? I really think the only thing she new about Suboxone is that it is addictive.

Sorry I really didn't know where to put this post. I didn't even want to talk about it with my husband because he is just coming around to this idea. Also, I asked a question in side effects section if anyone has any insight please respond. Thank you.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2010 10:04 pm 
Honestly....it's no one's business but your family's how/what you and your son choose to do to treat his addiction! It is very unfortunate that uninformed people feel completely justified in telling you what you're doing wrong!! It's especially annoying when the methods they're employing appear to be failing. HELLO?!?!?!?! Who's the expert?
You are not required to tell anybody all the details of your son's treatment. I'm assuming these upsetting conversations occurred in a support group setting. If that's the case, I would hope there would have been a therapist moderating the meeting who would step in and stop the nonsense. If it happened in an AlAnon meeting or something....again I would hope the facilitator of the meeting would have stepped in. If this all happened in a more private setting......hopefully you've learned a valuable lesson: there is not likely to be a whole lot of people in your life that you'll be able to speak freely to about your son's addiction and treatment. You'll have too much judgmentalism, criticism, and unsolicited advice from people who have not walked in your shoes.
If I were you, if you've found a good therapist/counselor, I'd stick with that individual for your support and individual and/or family counseling. If you're lucky you may find that you have one or two friends or family members who will be willing to educate themselves and be supportive of you/your son's decisions. Otherwise.....keep it to yourself. All that nonsense will just muddy the water and cause you to question yourself. If you can lay your head on your pillow each night and rest, knowing that you're doing the best you know to do to help your son....then who cares what these naysayers think? Hopefully after a few months time, when your son is stable and doing well with his Suboxone treatment, those results will speak for themselves. Until then, don't add to your distress by sharing information to others only to get shot down by people who don't know what they're talking about.
It is frustrating for sure. We've talked about it before. We just have to do what we can, when we are able, to get the word out about what Suboxone treatment is, how it works and that it has and will continue to change lives and in many cases save lives. There's no better proof than seeing a life turned around. I'm praying for that for your son.
Hang in there Madyson! Don't let a few people's nonsense get you down....you have nothing to prove to these people!


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 Post subject: Hey.......
PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2010 7:56 am 
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Just remember opinions are like ass_oles, everyone got one !!! In time all of this little bullshit will pass, I promise,, Good luck, I hope your son is getting at least a little sleep by now, Mike


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2010 11:41 am 
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The best thing you can do is teach those people who are uninformed about the benefits of Buprenorphine treatment. People are uncomfortable with change and what they are unfamiliar with, it is only through education that we can begin to help others. Sometimes I feel like I am banging my head against a wall when I tell people how much I see others benefit from Bupe treatment because they are stuck with the idea that all drugs are bad. It is crucial that every success story about Bupe gets told.
Take the frustration you are feeling and start working to advocate for medication assisted addiction treatment. We need all the help we can get!

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"It is never too late to be what you might have been!" - George Eliot


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 16, 2010 7:16 am 
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When I was inducted on suboxone I was 22-23 and had to convince my father to let me go on it, but he was very responsive to what I had to say. I was using on and off since I was 19, so I guess he was as sick and desperate as I was for me to stop using oxycontin and heroin. I didn't know much about bupe before I went on it, but I did know it was my only hope after relapsing and recovering in multiple cycles for 5 long years. I vaguely remember showing my dad video clips on suboxone's main website. He wasn't exited about it and he was very skeptical but he still listened to me.

Now after 3 years of being on sub my father asks still asks me how much longer I'm going to be on this stuff occasionally and I tell him "I don't know," probably a few more years, which seems about right but how do I really know for sure.

The whole point of this response is my dad has seen the changes I have made with my life and I think he respects suboxone, but he is still waiting for me to taper off. He never did go on one suboxone website from lack of interest and he always considered my addiction a very sore subject, but he never stopped believing in me because I got my shit together.
I made him respect this medication with the huge changes I have made. I read your other thread and you mentioned your husband is not happy with your son being on suboxone. The only way he will respect it is if it works out for your son and that's is just the way it is period.

So my father has seen the changes I have made but no doubt I have gone way above and beyond what the average person can accomplish. The day I got on suboxone I literally made a 5 year plan to get my life together and so far the only promise I broke to myself was to quit suboxone in 3 years; I even quit smoking the second week I started sub and haven't had one drag of a cigarette since. It took me a long time to realize though and it is still hard to accept that there is a possibility I may be on sub for an indefinite amount of time. I would of definitely tapered sub a long time ago if my life wasn't so stressful with college. My classes are very challenging and I made a lot of promises to my family that I have to keep and the suboxone allows me to do these things. It is my secret weapon. Hopefully you can prove everyone wrong through your sons success.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 16, 2010 9:36 am 
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Mike T. you made me cry with your heart felt story of success. You must be so proud! I am praying that a year or so from now you will see me posting a similar story about my son's success.



Mike T wrote:
When I was inducted on suboxone I was 22-23 and had to convince my father to let me go on it, but he was very responsive to what I had to say. I was using on and off since I was 19, so I guess he was as sick and desperate as I was for me to stop using oxycontin and heroin. I didn't know much about bupe before I went on it, but I did know it was my only hope after relapsing and recovering in multiple cycles for 5 long years. I vaguely remember showing my dad video clips on suboxone's main website. He wasn't exited about it and he was very skeptical but he still listened to me.

Now after 3 years of being on sub my father asks still asks me how much longer I'm going to be on this stuff occasionally and I tell him "I don't know," probably a few more years, which seems about right but how do I really know for sure.

The whole point of this response is my dad has seen the changes I have made with my life and I think he respects suboxone, but he is still waiting for me to taper off. He never did go on one suboxone website from lack of interest and he always considered my addiction a very sore subject, but he never stopped believing in me because I got my shit together.
I made him respect this medication with the huge changes I have made. I read your other thread and you mentioned your husband is not happy with your son being on suboxone. The only way he will respect it is if it works out for your son and that's is just the way it is period.

So my father has seen the changes I have made but no doubt I have gone way above and beyond what the average person can accomplish. The day I got on suboxone I literally made a 5 year plan to get my life together and so far the only promise I broke to myself was to quit suboxone in 3 years; I even quit smoking the second week I started sub and haven't had one drag of a cigarette since. It took me a long time to realize though and it is still hard to accept that there is a possibility I may be on sub for an indefinite amount of time. I would of definitely tapered sub a long time ago if my life wasn't so stressful with college. My classes are very challenging and I made a lot of promises to my family that I have to keep and the suboxone allows me to do these things. It is my secret weapon. Hopefully you can prove everyone wrong through your sons success.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 16, 2010 9:45 am 
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You are so right. I tried to talk to the woman with the 17 year old about sub treatment because she actually said her son begged her to be on it. He had experienced Suboxone in detox. How sad and short sighted that she is unable to hear his plea for help. If I ever bump into her. I am going to tell her our story. I know I may not be able to convince everyone that this is the answer but I can tell them about my sons hopeful success and all these wonderful stories here at the suboxforum. Thank you for helping me see that the more we all talk about the success stories of Suboxone, the more accepted and less stigma there will be attached to Sub. I hope one day that anyone one who needs and wants Suboxone will be able to find a doctor and program to be a part of. Right now that is not what it sounds like...it sounds like for some it is difficult if not impossible.

shelwoy wrote:
The best thing you can do is teach those people who are uninformed about the benefits of Buprenorphine treatment. People are uncomfortable with change and what they are unfamiliar with, it is only through education that we can begin to help others. Sometimes I feel like I am banging my head against a wall when I tell people how much I see others benefit from Bupe treatment because they are stuck with the idea that all drugs are bad. It is crucial that every success story about Bupe gets told.
Take the frustration you are feeling and start working to advocate for medication assisted addiction treatment. We need all the help we can get!


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 16, 2010 1:23 pm 
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Madyson007 I truly feel for you. My parents were VERY skeptical about me starting Suboxone 3 years ago. As others have stated their knowledge of the medication ended with "it's like methadone isn't it?" They thought I would be trading one addiction for another but they've since learned better. While they have asked a couple of times when I think I might taper off they are no longer pushing me. In fact a little while ago when I lost health insurance through my parents they even helped me afford the medication as money is very tight at least for now. Anywho I've managed to get a bachelors while on Suboxone hold down a job and not get into anymore legal trouble. Before I started Suboxone I was right on the verge of being kicked out of school, I was on probation for a previous dui, and I truly thought I had no future. I could almost see myself eventually committing suicide. I always figured the best way to end things would be to intentionally OD. Using opiates takes sooooo much work it's an absolute miserable existence. I remember being so envious of other "normal" people who could function without having to chew up oxycontin every several hours to keep from getting extremely sick and depressed. I had lost all my friends I was basically just waiting to die. I say all of this to make the point that others who are ignorant of what Suboxone can do if it's used correctly can say whatever they'd like to me I know where I am now and where I was before. I had to make alot of changes myself but unlike when I tried using abstinence based recovery programs in the past I felt human again and I no longer spent every waking hour of the day thinking about using. I still just blows my mind that 12 step programs are made to seem the "right" way for everyone to get clean. I'm so excited for people 12 step programs work for but along with many other addicts I know it wasn't able to keep me clean. If it were made more public how many tens of thousands of Americans die every year from direct opiate overdose or health complications as the result of chronic opiate abuse maybe people would be more open to options that actually have a higher success rate than 10%. If someone had any other potentially deadly disease no one would think twice about which method of treatment should be used, they would all choose the treatment with the highest success rate and not the one that was more socially "acceptable". I'm so very happy to hear of a parent taking the time to actually research and be open to more effective forms of treatment. I wish you and your son much success and I really appreciate your joining our community. Please always feel free to PM me or any of the other moderators if you have any questions, concerns, or comments
Take Care,
Matt

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2010 8:36 pm 
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It is sad that people don't understand. But when I went on suboxone the first option presented was methadone and I was like "absolutely not" just like people are now about suboxone. People just don't know enough about it yet. I too was about to intentionally overdose if there wasn't anything else out there for me. I even wrote a letter to my doctor after starting treatment and told him how much I appreciated this opportunity because I was ready to die. It is a lot of work to be on painkillers. It is exhausting.

It is interesting to think about this again as having just gone through the misery of withdrawal and not really tapering, and then thinking about the withdrawal from oxycontin, makes me realize how easy this has actually been. When I withdrew from oxycontin I was ready to put a gun to my head or overdose. I haven't felt suicidal once from suboxone withdrawal. I have felt like crap but not that bad. I think suboxone is life saving and life altering.

Hopefully people will understand eventually.

Cherie


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