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Would you be willing to get a buprenorphine implant?
Yes 58%  58%  [ 14 ]
No 42%  42%  [ 10 ]
Total votes : 24
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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2012 12:30 am 
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I'm interested to know how many people would actually be interested / willing to do this, especially those in the US who get their monthly supply of Suboxone without needing to go into a clinic on a daily / 3-5 daily basis (unlike us poor prisoners of her majesty)...

I do get the feeling people like myself, who need to go to the pharmacy every 2-3 days would see much more benefit to the implant. But it doesn't stop there. I'm curious as to whether non IV drug users may be more apprehensive to get an invasive procedure like an implants and IV addicts may be more comfortable with an idea like that?

Let me know.

Here's how the implant works:

Image

Basically, 1-3 implants (dependent on dose requirements) are put under the skin on the arm. The implants slowly release buprenorphine into the body over 6 months, meaning a person can pretty much forget about it in that time.


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PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2012 8:24 am 
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Hey Tear,

I felt the need to explain my vote because I don't feel like it is as simple as a yes/no vote for me. I voted yes, however in the circumstances I am currently in I would not want to get the implant. Right now I am on my first try at sobriety, on a fairly low dose of suboxone, and plan on tapering fairly soon. My yes vote was because I took the question to mean would I ever, under any circumstances, get an implant of bupe. To that I would say yes. If I was a long term maintenance patient then I would definitely consider the implant. Personally I think it would be beneficial if I was a patient who had tried to taper and found myself relapsing several times after quitting suboxone. If it was proven to me that complete abstinance was not something that would work for me in the near future than I think the implant would be much less trouble than putting that awful tasting strip in your mouth every day...and it would knock out all those monthly doctor visits. Sounds like a win win situation to me!


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PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2012 8:50 am 
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I voted yes, undoubtedly. I'm on sub for pain and addiction and I don't plan on coming off anytime soon. It would be the PERFECT option for me.

Now if I recall correctly, DOAQ was actually in the trial for this product. I think she wrote about it a prior thread, if anyone is so inclined to look for it.

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PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2012 7:24 pm 
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I remember reading an article from Dr. J a while back where he mentioned some potential benefits of implants. One of them was that in theory, they may make it easier to taper. Because once the implant wears off, the dose it delivers gradually tapers over a period of months. In theory, once a person gets down to using just one implant (apparently people can use up to three to get the dose they require), they could let that implant wear off on its own, leaving it in for longer than the 6 months, and the natural dose reduction can act like a gradual taper on its own.

Unsure if that may effect people's choice.

One of the big benefits for me stems from my fast metabolism of sublingual bupe. I've had issues over my time on bupe because my body seems to burn through my doses too fast. I've found that under a certain dose, I don't get 24 hour coverage, even with twice daily dosing. In theory, the implant will remove this problem, so I should get 24 hour consistent dose delivery, thus 24 hours blockage.


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PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2012 8:48 pm 
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There is no way in hell I would even consider this. It seems to be potentially more dangerous and if something were to go wrong with it, it would be a disaster to fix. It also seems to be a commitment for six months and if you had any sudden health related problems and buprenorphine was hurting the situation, once again seems like it would be extremely complicated to fix. I like to be in control of my body and the doses I take, this implant would destroy that aspect. For me, there seems to be more negatives than positives that can come out of the situation. I am not even sure if I would choose no suboxone at all compared to this "project". The risks don't seem to outweigh the reward in this situation. Everything I stated are just potential problems that can come out of this based on my observations. For the people are in favor of this form of treatment I respect your decision, especially for those of whom, like tearjerker, that receive small supplies of the drug and have to get more from either a clinic daily or fill a small prescription every few days.


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PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2012 11:03 pm 
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I would most likely do it. since like hat,
I dont plan on going off any time soon. It'd be nice not to have to worry about it,
or where it is.

BUT, and thats a big huge BUT

I wouldnt wana be one of the first, or even the first hundred.

this to me, would be like being in the first 'group' to invade a small country. You dont walk in the front,
cuz theres
[marq=right]
*******LANDMINES********[/marq]

there are always "bugs" to work outta everything. And I would just sort of wana

'hide and watch' to make sure everything was worked out

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PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2012 2:41 am 
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Probuphine has been in trials for like 5 years at least, so hopefully they have most of the bugs worked out by now. (I was in the 2nd phase trials in 2007).

I can definitely see some positives to the implant idea for treating addiction. Having been through the implant and explant process for Probuphine I can tell you it's not a huge deal. It took like 20 minutes and didn't hurt. My implants did migrate away from the implant site so taking them back out involved a bigger incision than putting them in, but it still wasn't a big deal, and I don't think that's a really common experience.

On the pro side for the implant here are some of my thoughts:

1. You don't have to freak out wondering if your doctor is going to refill your prescription every month.

2. You don't have to worry about losing your pills or someone stealing them. And no temptation to divert them.

3. You don't have to dose every day (or more). You can just forget about it.

4. For a planned surgery you could have the implant removed ahead of time, just like you can quit Suboxone ahead of time.

5. Stable level of bupe in your bloodstream eliminates ups and downs.

6. The implant eliminates your ability to "play doctor" with your dose.

7. No naloxone (for those who are sensitive).

8. Implant makes it more difficult to take a "vacation" from your meds in order to get high.

On the con side:

1. More difficult to fine-tune your dose.

2. Not so great for pain management situations unless you're able to supplement the implant with oral bupe when you need it.

3. More difficult to be in control of your taper.

4. Can complicate need for emergent pain relief (accident, emergency surgery, etc.), but I'm not sure how much more than being on a blocking dose of Suboxone complicates these situations.

5. Having plastic rods in your arm just under your skin is kinda weird and if you bang them or compress them it can be painful.

6. Does leave a small scar on inner arm. Fun to tell people "that's where the aliens put the implant," though.

So that's my 2 cents. If you want to ask me questions about the trial, please do...but be aware that I either got placebo implants or they didn't work for me so I had to leave the study and switch to suboxone treatment so my experience is limited.

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PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2012 9:36 am 
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DoaQ, you said your implants migrated away from the implant site.....do those damn things have legs?? We're they goin' south for the winter?

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PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2012 11:33 am 
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Oh Romeo...you SO funny!

I had 4 implants, they are like matchstick sized plastic rods and 2 of mine shifted slightly away from the implant incision so they had to make a T shaped incision to get them all out.

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