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PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 5:31 pm 
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I know after birth mothers have postpartum depression and also me considering me doing adoption but im going to start on medications to deal with that but im wondering why I've been so snappy while taking subutex or tapering myself I can be happy then all of a sudden im snapping mad yelling etc then when I take my subutex im fine im thinking I've become dependent on them which im not a doctor I can't tell


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 9:09 pm 
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When a person tapers of ANY drug with opioid effects, including buprenorphine, that person will have decreased activity in opioid brain pathways-- meaning less happiness, less pleasure, etc. It isn't 'because of suboxone' or buprenorphine; it is because at some point, you developed a tolerance to opioids. As long as you keep taking buprenorphine, you avoid the need to re-train your receptors, and to eliminate your tolerance. You could stay on buprenorphine forever; I have people who have taken it for many years. It is a very safe medication, and the tolerance to buprenorphine doesn't change over time (because of the ceiling effect). But if you decide, for some reason, that you have to stop buprenorphine, you will go through a couple months of withdrawal-- irritability, fatigue, depression, etc--- until your receptors get regenerated and back to normal.

Since many people just go back to using opioid agonists, I generally recommend just staying on buprenorphine. I've treated many people with the medication, and it is about the safest thing out there to prescribe... but buprenorphine allowed you to stop pain pills without withdrawal at some point in the past, and that withdrawal is still waiting for you.

I recommend that people at least stay at a good dose of buprenorphine, until they decide to taper. There is NO value in keeping yourself at the edge of withdrawal, and miserable, for week after week.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2014 8:51 am 
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If this was your first child, I would really encourage you to not discount the effects that your emotions and crazy hormone changes can have on you during this time. And yes, though I haven't been through it, I would imagine that the adoption could also be playing a part in it.

What are your plans for treating your addiction from here on out? If you continue to struggle, I don't see why you should have to quit the bupe at all. As Dr. J explained, it is a wonderful way to treat your addiction safely.

I also must add that I absolutely applaud your choice to sacrifice your own desires and give your baby up to a family that wanted him desperately and can provide a good home for him. I have two friends who have adopted two children each, and know others who are involved in foster care. It is such a wonderful experience to witness these families and the beautiful relationship they have with their kids. And none of it would be possible without mothers like you who are willing to do what's best for their babies. You should be very proud of yourself, I'm sure it wasn't easy for you.

On another note, I have a boy who was born on the same day as yours! My second child was born on January 28, 2002. He is a very strong willed young man. :roll: A natural born leader...LOL. Very trying at times, but I know he will eventually be a strong man, not easily swayed by others opinions. January boys are awesome!

Q

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No one can make you feel inferior without your consent. ~ Eleanor Roosevelt


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Fond Du Lac Psychiatry
Dr. Jeffrey Junig, M.D., Ph.D.

  • Board Certified Psychiatrist
  • Asst Clinical Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin

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