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PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2016 10:29 am 
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I'm not clear on how bupe reduces...eliminates?....cravings. Even
when I've got a decent high going I want more. I get that bupe
occupies certain critical receptors in an especially tenacious way, so that
it would take a hefty amount of opiate to dislodge them.

But I guess I'm wondering how it works subjectively. In other words, what
does it feel like? Is it sort of analogous to losing interest in food after eating a full meal?
Is there a kind of satisfied feeling...not a high but a sense of not needing anything?

I'm really interested in this as to me it seems like the whole
ballgame. If it works in that way it really would be a
very good thing.

Thanks to all,
G.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2016 12:51 pm 
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What I first noticed when I was started on suboxone was that I felt much better and that I felt "normal". By normal, I mean that I felt like I felt before I ever took any pain meds, before I ever got high. And I easily remembered that feeling because I didn't start having a problem with addiction until I was in my mid 30s.
I remember walking out to my car with my cousin thinking, "I could easily drive myself home." Because I felt totally normal.

Within 24 hours I was astounded by the fact that the obsession was gone. I can't remember when I first noticed it, but it was definitely before the next day. It was an incredibly freeing feeling. But it also meant that I didn't know what to do with my brain! If you've had a hobby you haven't picked up in a while or some books that you'd like to read, you should have them on stand by for when you realize that you have all this time that is not longer occupied by the cravings/obsession.

My doctor had me off percocet for 48 hours before I inducted in his office. So my reaction could have been more dramatic than other people who didn't wait as long. But it was a dramatic change.

Amy

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2016 12:58 pm 
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You'll know as soon as you're induced. I too was doubtful of any substance getting rid of my intense cravings. The dose they gave me was too strong. That was my fault for telling them my tolerance was very high. I was hungering for relief and felt like crap.

Once I got home, everything was different. At the time I felt like I could stop any addiction, habit, even eating was an option. A very strange drug it is, especially in large doses. Being given 24 mg's the first time, my MU receptors were completely saturated and happy. Never had I felt so good and normal at the same time. What I didn't know back then was that Buprenorphine was another opiate, albeit a partial agonist.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2016 1:57 pm 
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My experience was a lot like Amy. I didn't become addicted until my 30s also. I waited 32 hours from my last opiate to my first dose of suboxone. I started noticing the cravings being gone by the very next morning. I remember I had to go to the pharmacy that next morning to get my prescription and still woke up with zero cravings just from the suboxone that I had taken from the day before at my induction, I hadn't even dosed yet that next day. Zero cravings and tons of blessings is what my experience was and still is.

I had little faith anything would ever lift cravings because of the lengths I'd went to trying to get in recovery in the past. I'd been to detox's, inpatient rehab, jail,cold turkey.....nothing worked on my cravings and it was those cravings that got me every time when I'd relapse. So for something to actually lift those cravings for me, and made me feel like I did before I was addicted, was a miracle. That's the best I can explain it to ya. I have to agree with Rule, ur stressing urself out for nothing. U shouldn't put it off anymore. Ur doctor may not be happy when he hears u haven't inducted yet. Don't let this opportunity pass u up. Give it a chance, it's worth ur life. Hope u understand what a lifesaver this could be for u.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 4:10 pm 
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It ll be fine once ypu get started Godfrey.
My story is much the same as others. Couldn't believe I felt so well. No cravings. And this was almost 6 years ago.


Razor.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2016 10:02 pm 
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I'm very grateful and encouraged to hear the stories about how cravings
disappeared almost by magic. Gives me lots of hope.

Thanks to all who took the time to help a newcomer.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2016 12:53 am 
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Just try to remember all this is for the good of your recover. We all so want you to induce soon so you'll know firsthand what it's like being on Suboxone. Your not going to believe it! It is such a lifesaver. I hope you stick around this forum too. When we are all old times, we will be sitting around laughing about this one day. I can't wait to see how it's going to be when your on your Suboxone. It's such a relief to be able to feel normal again. I know I'm anxious for your reaction after you induce. We want you to join us 100%. Looking forward to that day. Bamagirl :D


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2016 9:04 am 
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I've some cardiac issues to be concerned about, in addition to all the other usual baggage. I've spoken with several physicians all of whom are in agreement that the size of my habit could leave me with withdrawal symptoms for several days after induction. In order to minimize that chance, I've decided to keep on whittling away at my daily dosage. All that said I don't plan to delay much longer. I've a date in mind after discussing the situation with my prescribing doctor and my wife. I've also learned that tolerance is quite a fluid thing, so that just going an hour or two past the time when I'm beginning to think I can't stand anymore will reduce my tolerance. If I can manage that, any residual WD symptoms should be minimal.

Rule, I accept your apology. I understand you mean well, but at the same time it's easy to forget an anonymous poster is just that, someone you don't know. Sometimes the old "I'm doing this for your own good" explanation can be a handy rationalization for acting on less noble impulses. I don't think that's the case with you, but then we're all human.

Peace.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 2016 5:27 pm 
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Hey Godfrey, thanks for the explanation. I'll go ahead and delete the other posts just to keep this topic on course.

Good idea on reducing the tolerance before induction. It seems you and your doctor know what to do. Keep us posted on your progress.

r

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 19, 2016 12:46 am 
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Thanks rule. Very glad to know there are no hard feelings.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 19, 2016 9:55 pm 
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Hi Godfrey, I am Queenie, the grandmother of the forum. 74 years young.

My experience with Suboxone is the same as all the others explained. You just feel "normal" and thank God for that. It's the best thing that ever happened to me.

Please let us know how you are doing and I am glad you came tgo our house. "Welcome home"

Love, Queenie


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2016 9:28 am 
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Thanks, Queenie,

Nice to meet someone in my general age range. At the bupe clinic I go to I'd say I'm far and away the oldest.
The youngsters look at me with a kind of bafflement. "Hey look at that old guy! You'd think he'd have known better than to be messing around with drugs."

But I've been an addict all my life more or less. When I was a kid I used to get my hair cut once a month. Starting at about age 7 I'd walk the mile to the shop by myself....a parent might get arrested these days for allowing that. Old Nick the barber used to keep a pile of battered "Police Gazettes" for his customers...a kind of lurid tabloid of the day directed at men. They used to specialize in crime stories and cautionary tales about crazed "dope fiends" and "reefer madness."

I couldn't wait to grow up and try those drugs. Somehow I understood that if they were causing all that trouble they had to feel awfully good. I regret it now of course. One of my favorite lines about drugs
is from the movie Little Miss Sunshine. Alan Arkin playing the heroin addicted grandfather says..."When you're young you have to be crazy to fool around with drugs. When you're old you have to be crazy not to."


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2016 1:49 am 
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Well now Godfrey, you might just become the grandfather of our forum, dear! That was a very sweet post to Queenie. Thanks for sharing that side of yourself. You didn't seem worried or anything. I loved that movie Little miss sunshine. Bet I watched it 10 times. lol I'm going to say it again, I can't wait till you induce. You please be sure and let us all know, ok. Yours truly, Angie AKA Bamagirl


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2016 3:14 pm 
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Quote:
One of my favorite lines about drugs
is from the movie Little Miss Sunshine. Alan Arkin playing the heroin addicted grandfather says..."When you're young you have to be crazy to fool around with drugs. When you're old you have to be crazy not to."


I love that one too! My favorite part of the movie. Unfortuately, he overdosed and died. He is one that could have lived on with Suboxone and could still complain about the "not chicken again for dinner!!"

You and I are in the retirement club. I'm 62 but feel 32 most of the time. Suboxone gave me another lease on life and I am so eternally grateful for it. My mother already buried one son from addiction. She could not handle another one. I came close, very close. Luckily she never knew or it would have broken her heart with worry. She passed away in peace right before my induction.

Let us know how the tolerance task is going. Good luck with that one. It's easier said than done. I could never lessen my intake. Just the opposite with Suboxone though. You'll understand soon enough. I just hope you're stronger than me.

r

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2016 12:02 pm 
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Hey Rule


I think I've mentioned I've cut my morning dose in half. Evening dose I've been splitting in half over 4 or 5 hours. Total is the same, but it has definitely lowered my tolerance that if I went back to my full dose all at once it would certainly give me a far better high than it once did.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2016 1:10 pm 
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You're a stronger man than I. But you have the right idea. With addicts, we tend to overthink every issue when it comes to our favorite drug of choice. What has to happen is to just do it and not look back. That is the only way.

There is a saying in AA that I like. "I knew one day I'd have to stop abusing ____, I just don't want it to be today". So very true.

That is fantastic you are able to do this. It is what you set your mind to and will succeed I'm sure.

Keep it up,

r

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2016 4:59 pm 
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This is what I noticed. Suboxone has two purposes. It quells the physical and the psychological urge. The physical was big but the psychological part was a HUDGE thing for me. Other opiates will hold back the psychical urge but they do nothing for the psychological urges such as when one feels the need to take more, counting pills etc. We are tied up psychologicaly big time and that part for me was very damaging. To be able to take a dose and not have to waste energy with the psychological urges was a HUDGE plus for me.

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