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PostPosted: Mon Apr 21, 2014 2:41 pm 
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Hello! I really need some advice and truth regarding sub treatment. Firstly, i bbelieve my insurance will cover the medicine, but not the visits. How much will that first month in treatment cost me? One dr stated 200 first visit, 70 thereafter, and how many times do i see my doctor after month one. Do i pay for drug screens. Can a good doctor work with me finance wise?I can afford 200, but not more than that. I have a few doctors e-mailing me and after reading stuff online, am i trading one addiction for another? I have been opiate addicted 14 years. This seems like the only option i have. Idk....

Thx LJ


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 21, 2014 11:47 pm 
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I deleted the other post with the same content.

I hope you find help. I have a hard time understanding, though, the money issue. Are you getting your oxycodone for free? The reason I ask is because for most people, the money spent on treatment is more than offset-- often many times over-- by the savings from not using. I suppose some people are having their habits covered by medicaid or insurance, but otherwise I cannot imagine an opioid habit that costs less than $200 per month.

Buprenorphine treatment is about the cheapest thing you will find in medicine. Yes, I realize that many docs don't take medicaid--- but that is because small practices don't have the ability to cost-shift the way hospitals do. A hospital or healthcare system will be paid tens of thousands of dollars for one heart surgery patient.... so they have resources to cover the minor expenses. A private doc has no MRI income, no lab payments (labs generate over $600 per sample from medicaid-- double that from insurers).

Even when people are in network, the new 'affordable care act' policies come with deductibles in the thousands of dollars.... so a trip to the ER will cost $700, and having a baby will be $3000-$10000.... so why would someone expect a treatment like buprenorphine, with the potential to save you from a life of hell, to cost any less?

Actually, it does cost less-- much less. Less than any surgery for any organ system. Less than any pain clinic injection. Less than any MRI. Less than visits to other specialists. Suboxone is a bargain.... even at $500 per month (which nobody charges). That would come to $6000 over an entire year..... whereas residential treatment, with 5% success rates, will charge $30000 for one month!

Maybe I'm a bit touchy tonight....

When new patients ask me if they are trading a drug for a drug, my usual action is to hand them their money back, and ask them to get on the waiting list after they are sure about starting buprenorphine. There is a process where people have their lives saved by buprenorphine.... but then after a year, they start blaming buprenorphine for all of their problems. Because of that annoying attitude, I never start buprenorphine in a person who hesitates in any way.

To answer your question, there is a difference between addiction and physical dependence. If you start buprenorphine now, you can skip the withdrawal from full detox (which usually just leads back to using again). But at some point, if you ever stop buprenorphine, that withdrawal is still waiting for you. Buprenorphine lowers the tolerance of anyone taking more than 60 mg of oxycodone per day, so your eventual withdrawal will be reduced by buprenorphine--- but not eliminated.

The difference, thought, is that people who take buprenorphine correctly can take it once or twice per day, and then forget that they are even on anything. They can live life without the constant focus on getting another dose-- because the brain is tricked into thinking that nothing is wearing off. So.... you do not change from one addiction to another. You put your addiction in remission, and take a medication that allows you to skip out on horrible withdrawal now, when you are still unstable. Sometime down the line, if you choose, you can take on that withdrawal, and discontinue buprenorphine.

J


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 26, 2014 8:05 pm 
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Ty kindly! Im sorry it took long to get back. I havent quite come to a conclusion and i can understand your frustration. I found a dr that accepts my insurance and has explained, induction.

Run ppl! Use this drug for short detox!

Tc


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 27, 2014 12:30 am 
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Ladyjazz- I understand how scary the unknowns can be and it feels a little overwhelming at first. But it's so worth it, I'm only 3 weeks in and actually have bronchitis right now but still wouldn't change anything to have the oxy habit back. In three weeks alone I've payed tons of bills, bought stuff I've been needing forever, didn't have to panic when pulling up my bank statement(which I used to do daily) the list could go on and on, and again, its only been THREE weeks! I was really scared too at first but the day I stepped foot in my sub doctor's office and the nurse asked if this was what I really wanted, I didn't even have to think. I said Yes! I want off these oxys more then anything in the world!! Sure there has been some rough parts, but this has changed my life already! Don't think twice, just do it! You won't regret it!! Good luck, feel free to reach out for support. I've had so much encouragement myself already! The oxys I was constantly chasing, constantly worried if I'd have enough, or if I could scrape the money together for the next days worth. The suboxone is just routine now, as routine as my aleve. I forget sometimes that I even need to take it. Trust me, it will change everything!

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