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PostPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2012 12:35 pm 
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hey. I am just wondering what everyone is doing for recovery? I mean that is our common interest here...to get better. Lol. I just have some rough days even with subs and I kno my recovery isn't perfect by any means. This is even with going to meetings, groups, talking to other addicts daily, and numerous other things on top of sub...but I still struggle. I bring this up because I kno tons of folks that just take sub and that's it! I guess it works for them but idk how. This med was made to be used with a treatment plan! So why do I feel like my friend/sponsor and I are the only people I know personally that are going that extra mile on this stuff? Am I just that behind? Am I right where I should be at 7 months since my last lapse? Idk. I just want to kno what other people on here are doing to help themselves get better because I know for a fact that justtaking sub and sitting at home doesn't work in real life! It may work for awhile or even work while on it...but I have seen 100% of the time that people think they got a handle on things and go off sub and relapse quickly. That is why I want to either make sure I'm doing everything I can or just accept that I will be on this stuff forever...who knows man...


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2012 5:51 pm 
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Hey MovieMaker1,

I'm gonna copy and paste something DoaQ posted a week or so ago because it pretty much sums up what I attempt to do for my recovery and she stated it all so beautifully. In addition to what I'm about to paste, I try to keep myself centered. My emotions tend to get the best of me at times and I have to keep myself centered. My addiction counselor used to always tell me to live my life in balance too. Staying centered and living my life in balance are some things I do for my recovery too.

Here's what DoaQ posted:

I guess the first thing that comes to mind is the fact that there are a certain amount of people who will "spontaneously recover" from addiction. These are the people who get clean and stay clean kind of regardless of treatment. They wake up one day and are sick of the shit so they quit, or they have a near-death experience, or they hit bottom, or they just "grow out of it." I know a lot of people like this and I do not understand them at all. They just quit and stay quit and don't really seem to think about it much.

Then there's the rest of us. I don't think there is any magic bullet or secret recipe to staying quit or to staying in recovery. The most important thing is that you have to just do something and you have to stick with it. If you slip, then get back up on the wagon as quickly as you can so that you don't totally lapse back into addiction.

You have to do a lot of work on your own head. You have to come to an understanding that the way you've been relating to the world, to yourself and your life is messed up. You have to learn new ways to deal with shit without getting high...or seeking another unhealthy means of escape. You have to learn how to face up to stuff. How you learn all these things is going to be different for different people. And probably even different for yourself at different times in your life.

Cultivating some kind of discipline in you life is a good idea. For me it's meditation practice, which is a daily thing. For someone else it might be working out, or a practice of rigorous honesty with a sponsor or taking up a martial art...whatever it is, you have to show up and do it even when you don't really feel like it (that's the discipline part).

Getting with a good addiction counselor, especially early in recovery is a good idea. Learning some CBT techniques for dealing with cravings and negative thought patterns is also good (check out SMART recovery for free resources). If you are still with a spouse or partner who survived your addiction with you, getting counseling together might be good as well.

Addressing any underlying physical or mental health issues is important. As is taking good care of your physical and mental health on an ongoing basis.

Make new friends who are either in recovery or just aren't addicts. Most of my recovery-centric interaction comes from this forum - in the rest of my life I hang out with people who just aren't and never were drug abusers. Their way of dealing with things, sense of healthy boundaries, and ability to enjoy life without chemicals has fortunately rubbed off on me. Get new hobbies - especially if drugs were your major source of relaxation and recreation. You need to get some enjoyment out of life or you'll be tempted to go back to drugs. Try new things and keep trying till you find what works.

For me, having goals that I'm trying to reach in my life has been important over the past 5 years. I finished my Associates Degree and started another certificate program, I set goals for learning new things at work, and I have personal goals that I'm trying to accomplish. I can't stand the feeling of stagnating in my life and having a concrete thing to work toward and a way of measuring my progress helps me avoid that feeling. Goals don't have to be huge either to have a big impact on your life. You'd be suprised at what changes a goal like volunteering your time somewhere twice a month or taking a walk with your kid after dinner once a week might bring about in your life.

There is also some research that shows that environment is a HUGE factor in relapse. So I guess if you have the means to totally relocate your life to some place that you've never lived before, that could help. But if you can't do that, you can do things like deleting all your drug contacts out of your phone, cutting off friends that still use and/or don't support your recovery, drive a different way to work if the old, familiar route sets off cravings and whatever else you can think of to avoid or neutralize triggers.

Read up on neuroscience and brain plasticity, read up on addiction medicine and new treatments. There's fascinating new research being done about how we acquire habits and how we can change them. Read the stories of people who have overcome addictions and see what they did to get where they are. Read things that are inspiring to you personally. Do whatever you can to cultivate a positive attitude.

And always remember that this is a process. Change is a process, and a recursive process at that, which means that at times you will regress or backslide or revisit some earlier stage in the process AND THAT IS OK. Just keep moving, keep trying, evaluate what you're doing and adjust.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2012 5:54 pm 
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I attend N/A meetings and work steps along with my sub treatment.

I also have a very close friend who is in A/A. She has 3 years clean and is my "main support" outside of my husband. I don't attend the A/A meetings, but I know some of the girls that are in that program so when they do something "special or fun", I tag along with them. I don't know anyone in N/A that I'm close enough with to hang out with outside of the rooms. Last Friday night some of the A/A women got together at my friends house & had a pool party/meeting. I went to that instead of going to my regular meeting. It was a blast, btw... We do usually talk about a lot of the same stuff and I know I could just go to A/A, but I can relate a little better listening to the stories at N/A. I mean, alcoholics are addicts too don't get me wrong, but most of the stories I hear and most of the people I talk to at N/A understand a lot more about the illegal things we do to get pills or whatever our DOC was... that part I can relate to more with them. I've never heard an alcoholic talk about getting arrested just for buying liquour. Maybe drinking & getting a DUI and/or public intox, but it's not illegal to buy a case of beer, ya know what I'm saying? Most opiate addicts had to do a lot of illegal stuff to get their DOC, that's all I'm saying and I can relate to that more in the N/A rooms.

I also have a 16 month old little girl who keeps me very, very busy and that's probably a very, very good thing for me right now! I am a stay at home mom, but at the end of the day, it sure doesn't feel like it...lol I know when I was working, I wasn't near as tired as I am now at the end of the day taking care of her, chasing her around pretty much 24/7. My husband works long hours and some days he gets home only an hour before it's her bed time, so on those days, it's just me. I love every minute of it though. I take her for long walks, we go swimming, to the park... it really does help to keep my mind off getting high.

I really do agree with you though that everyone should do something along with their sub treatment to help with their recovery. I personally don't think that I could stay clean and not relapse if it weren't for the meetings and my daughter. I too have my days where I start to feel indifferent about treatment and the what ifs. I don't necessarily want to get high, but I think we all have our days when we just struggle a little. If I were to just take my sub and not have anything else to kind of hold me accountable, I'd think a lot about getting high and why not? It just probably wouldn't work for me. Everybody's different though, and I'm sure there are some that it does work for, but I have to stay more focused and I need to feel like other people are depending on me to keep doing what I'm doing. I obviously never could stay sober and hold myself accountable for what I did...

I think this is a great topic


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2012 11:48 pm 
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Great topic!!!!!!

I absolutely agree.......... suboxone is soposed to be used as a PART of a whole treatment plan. Like a piece to this big jigsaw puzzle we're living in :D

my doctor just started these 'suboxone support groups' in july. I really like going. Every other week, I attend one on weds on my lunch hour. And on the 'other' week, I go on monday right after work. It REALLY helps, theres an addiction counselor there to answer questions, give support, ETC.
Before these meetings, there were a few of 'us' from my dr. office, going to an AA meeting in town.

I also saw an addiction therapist for about six months. I sorta felt like I hit a dead end with her. dont get me wrong, I learned alot while there, and I wouldnt take that back at all. But, I just felt like I had 'learned' all I could from her, and Im still looking for another one. I REALLY liked the counseling though. she was the first one I found that was certified in 'addiction' AND, had a sliding scale. I was paying $100 per visit, yea, that was the LOWEST of the scale, LOL
Anyways, I'd recomend counseling to ANYbody who has ever even THOUGHT about going.

Now, Im learning all I can about meditation.
I know it sounds corny, and Im just a beginer, but WOW, is all I have to say. here is a site Diary put up a while back

http://www.seattleinsight.org/Talks/Bro ... fault.aspx

they really put it into an easy way to understand different techniques and stuff.

In the begining of my recovery, I kept a journal, and wrote in it EVERY day, sometimes twice, LOL
THAT, has helped. I dont write every day anymore. and I also have my blog now, but its 'fun' to look back at the first few months, and see just how FAR Ive come. it really is AMAZING.

My son also helps keep me busy as HELL. he will be four in december, and he's a very active soul. he NEVER sits still. Not until he's about 20 mins from falling asleep at night, thats the only time he'll watch tv or anything. LOL
I want to break these chains,,, and do whatever I can to show him every OTHER way to live besides the whole 'drug culture' way, and anything to do with it.

last but not least, I started volunteering at one of the food pantrys here in town, once a month. It feels REALLY good to give back. I think I always underestimated that feeling of community.

So, that's all Ive got.
I think you can do ALL sorts of things, if it works for YOU, more power to ya :wink: :wink: :wink:

there are soooooo many things you can do, in so many different areas,,,, the sky really is the limit!!!!

and I do still miss getting high. but Im working on that.
its a process, and in the end the race is only within ourselves. :lol:

thanks again for a great topic.
I hope lots of people can get good ideas from this thread!!!!!!!!!!
have a great weekend, everybody!!!!!!

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2012 7:08 am 
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[font=Comic Sans MS]Hello everyone! This really is a wonderful topic. I've gotten great ideas from every single post already. This does happen tobe one of the areas that I sort of struggle with. I don't have any free time at all during the day or early evening. Like InvisbleShadow, I have an 18 month old little guy, and he keeps me very very busy. But outside of this forum, I really don't get the opportunity to do anything that doesn't involve my son.

Not that I am blaming him at all. Facts are facts. I don't get any help from family when it comes to watching him. I have a very supportive family though when it comes to my recovery, and if I asked them to, they would probably watch him as long as it is for my recovery. I'll give it a shot for sure.

For now, this forum is a huge, i mean HUGE part of my recovery. I look to you guys for support, encouragement, and to give suport where I can. I don't know how I would have made it through my daughters birthday in August without the help of nogroovin, Bboy, Diary, Romeo, InvisibleMovement, and a couple of others. I desperately needed help that day and the day after and you guys came through. So, helping other addicts on here is the east I can do to pay it forward.

Helping other people in recovery actually helps me tremendously. Just to be there to listen, advise when I can, or just let them know that I am here if they need me. It gives me a sense of purpose, and that helps me out a lot.

I do see an addiction counselor too. He gives me tons of great feedback, and I am working on myself, and the issues that lead me to relapsing every time. I think that this is a crucial step in truly recovering. Taking sub alone, ya it helps, but if I don't change the underlying behaviors, thoughts, and demons, they will surely be there waiting for me when I do come off of suboxone.

Thank you Movie Maker for starting this thread. We should have a whole section devoted to this. Actually I guess the whole website is devoted to this now that I think about it! Hahahaha,,,,im a little slow sometimes...lol

Hope that everyone has a great weekend....and dont forget abou thte chat meeting tonight!!!!! Thats a great thing to do for recovery too! Hope I don't forget now...how embarrassing would THAT be![/font]

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2012 2:11 am 
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Things I do for my recovery:

[1] Do what I do on Suboxforum (ie help people, act like a fool etc).
[2] Work hard every day to get my uni degree.
[3] Work hard every day to enjoy fulfilling relatiosnhips with my family, friends and girlfriend.
[4] Actively strive to stay clean at all times.
[5] Work on urges of all types, be they urges to smokes, eat junk food, check out women who aren't my girlfriend.
[6] Extend my knowledge in all aspects of the world.
[7] Pursue my hobby, namely writing music.
[8] Pursue my career.
[9] Stay away from recovery based activities that previously led to relapse.
[10] Strive every day to be as balanced, healthy and happy as I possibly can.

In the past I based my recovery around 12-step fellowships, advised by older cleaner members to care less about being socially accepted, educated and employed, and care more about working the steps and having a relationship with God. This path kept leading to relapse. If the definition of insanity is making the same mistake and expecting a different result, then returning to those groups again would be insane. It is for that reason I chose Suboxone, getting a job and getting an education instead of doing 3 meetings a day on welfare. So far it's working for me.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2012 6:49 pm 
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Hey TJ,

Since I know you are a fan of keeping it real on here, like to question the answers and so forth, I know you will not take offense to what I'm about to ask.

Do you blame NA for your relapses? One thing that you wrote on here a long time ago has stuck with me since. You said something along the lines that you had heard over and over in NA that if you were to go back out and use you may never come back and get clean again so when you did have a lapse, you thought had to go "all out". do you remember this? It was in one of the 12 step threads I think.

Anyways, i have gone to AA and not NA and I have experienced all manner of people telling others how to live. Some good some bad. It seems like you may have had some bad influences there. I have also learned a lot though from people that have great recoveries and a lot of them came to meetings for many years before they were able to get any real sobriety under their belt. I heard a speaker with 28 years say how he went to meetings for 7 years before he got sober.

I have learned some things that really help me with my recovery there using the 'take what you want and leave the rest' method. Also I identify as an alcoholic first, alcohol was my main thing and then the opiates became part of that for so long. Shit I started sub before I was able to stop drinking, kind of had a moment of clarity after a few months on sub and started going to meetings and haven't had a drink since, over 2 years. I wonder also if being on sub helped me to stop drinking. I never could before.

Anyway I dig the concept that helping others who still suffer helps you when nothing else can. That as i am sober for longer periods of time, the new people help remind me of what I was like when I came in there. I was really a mess and the way my mind works I forget what it was like easily. especially since I am down to .25mg and going to jump in the near future. I know I will need more meetings after that. I haven't been in quite a while, sub makes it easy to rest on my laurels as they say which is dangerous for me. I listen to speaker tapes a lot though. There is a great site with resources to free AA, NA and other 12 step speaker tapes called xa-speakers dot org

Anyway, ive been doing some soul searching since im not on a theraputic dose of bupe really. Finding myself kind of gravitate towards meetings because im afraid when i jump i will be tempted to drink and also trying to get some action going on around here :)

Thanks,
Gb


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2012 9:40 pm 
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I'll admit I focus more on my negative experiences in the rooms these days. While I was doing AA/NA I spent at least 90% of my time in those rooms 100% clean, no Suboxone no alcohol no nothing. And that is an achievement largely thanks to the rooms and the fellowship.

But unfortunately I never realised that fact while I was doing meetings, because all that seemed to matter to me while I was in those rooms was clean time. All's I remember was the constant shame of ID'ing as under 30 days clean after I'd had a week long bender.

And I acknowledge that it can take years before a person "gets it" using that method. But I didn't want to waste any more of my 20's trying to "get it" that way, because it seemed that while I did that program I was programmed to self-destruct completely whenever I used. Because I kept self-destructing, any progress in my life was interrupted. I was supposed to wait months or years before my sponsor would tell me I'm ready to study, to get a girlfriend etc. If I did manage to scrape a few months together and wait long enough for my sponsor to "give me the okay" to get a job and return to study, if I ever did have a drink on the weekend with family or friends (I've never been an alcoholic or had a problem with alcohol), I'd consider myself to have relapsed and end up bingeing on hard drugs. It was like I was convinced that the only way to get back from a period of using was to fuck myself up royally enough that I'd have to drop out of school and lose my job, until the pain was enough to make me wanna stop and return to the rooms. It's because that idea was drummed into my head every meeting that it became a self-fulfilling prophecy.

I don't blame NA for my choice to use. But I do blame NA for me not achieving anything in life while I was trying to get clean through that method, and for believing the only way out of a relapse was to self-destruct, beat myself up with drugs until I was damaged enough to recover again. I've used a few times since I've been on Sub, and because I stopped believing I'd have to give into some kinda "mental obsession", I kept it to just once. It wasn't easy, but it was achievable. I know being on Sub makes it easier, but while doing meetings I'd destroy myself, whether I was on Sub or not.

You make a really good point about the "take what you can and leave the rest" idea. I was never really good at that. Most likely this was to do with the institution I first went to that introduced me to the 12-steps when I was 24. This was a really full-on little illegal rehab / halfway house run by a crazy as fuck AA table-thumper. I remember going into our "groups" every day and he'd have in big writing on the whiteboard "YOUR BRAIN WANTS TO KILL YOU". Most of us went out of that program believing that most people in the fellowship weren't really working the program as it was designed by Bill W and Dr. Bob, that the fellowship had strayed from its path, and that NA wasn't right and the Big Book is the only true recovery. Really traditionalist. I remember when one of the old founders of the place, and one of the residents sponsors, came in and did a "3rd step prayer" session on his sponsee, walking into a garage with candles everywhere, all these guys fresh outta jail holding hands while the OCM had his hand on his head speaking in tongues like he was channeling god. I walked outta there feeling the power of that room, whatever it was. After that rehab, I thought taking what you needed and leaving the rest was kinda blasphemous. I remember being a couple of days clean judging anyone who suggested you take what you need and leave the rest, whether they had 2 days or 20 years.

I think now that I've de-brainwashed myself from that weird state I was in, it's really hard for me to not be resentful. It's kinda like the people who leave the 7th day adventists... once they get debrainwashed it's often pretty hard for them to say something nice about it.

All these feelings aside, I am open to returning to the program. But I'd only go there when I know I'm capable of only taking what I need and not getting all evangelical about it. I'd also only return when I'm ready to start tapering off Sub. I could then use the negative pressure of NA to motivate me to taper. But number 1 priority right now is getting my degree. I think it's more important that I finally achieve something meaningful at this point in my life.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2012 10:13 pm 
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Just to add.

I owe a fair bit to Suboxone. I feel Sub has helped me manage my cravings somewhat. However I acknowledge that the hard work is mine alone. I'd attempted Sub and methadone numerous times in the past but always relapsed, simply because I wasn't putting in the hard work in other parts of my life. Sub isn't a miracle medication. It just gives me that lil bit extra, just enough to give me choice over cravings.

Something else important is that for the first time in my life I've accepted my need to remain on mood-stabilisers. While I did NA I always felt there was a lack of understanding of mental illness and its need for medication. At times I felt a bit ashamed, or even "unclean" for needing mood stabilisers. Now I'm at peace with my need for treatment and taking it religiously, I've found my desire to use has diminished a lot. Actually these last couple of months after finding an anti-depressant that works without inducing hypomania, I haven't had urges to self-medicate at all. Getting mentally unwell is pretty synonymous with relapse for me. It was only after my first psychosis as a teen that I started using heroin.

The last few months there's been a box of endones sitting in my medication box and I haven't had any desire to touch them. Sure Oxy wasn't my drug of choice, but a couple of years ago I wouldn't have hesitated, whether I was on Sub or methadone or in NA or on my own. Most of this progress has simply come by hanging around healthy, non-addict family and friends and pursuing healthy activities, like my music, swimming, studying and having fun.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2012 4:50 am 
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my doc said i'm doing well :shock: just try and keep it simple.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2012 2:15 pm 
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Johnboy, I agree with the keep it simple statement you made.

When I first really started working my recovery, I tried to only work on one behavior at a time. Prior to that, I was trying to fix all of me all at once and I kept crashing and burning. I would get overwhelmed with trying to fix all of me in one fell swoop and it would always end up with me lapsing.

Like many folks, I think I overcomplicated my recovery. I made my recovery so much harder on myself than I had to because I was trying to become perfect.

In recovery, small steps.....even tiny steps forward is sometimes the best thing we can do for ourselves.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2012 5:48 am 
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The most important things I've done for my recovery since December 2008 (when I started sub) is individual therapy (definitely THE most crucial part), marriage counseling, and this forum.

For me therapy isn't just important due to all of my own unique past traumatic issues, but just for the help in looking inward for the ability to improve ourselves and our every day lives. I think it's a huge part of recovery and can be for anyone.

That said, studies do show that suboxone use along with counseling has no higher success rates than for those who didn't attend counseling. However, be aware that these were short term studies, so keep that fact in mind when considering such studies.

Good luck to you as your travel your own road of recovery.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2012 3:06 pm 
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that is right romeo". we all should be trying hard to find that first step again as you did, i'm glad you found it with a more clear and relaxed mind. it take's years for the mind to get back to it's most comfort state it use to be in. tear/tear/tear-Jrker.' man i no what your saying!! we struggle to fight and correct any thing that does not fit the BULL DOG :lol: all those words you put in and truth about what happen in the groups,and man you can make the true picture more see'able than i can!!
if we where on the battle ship i would give you full front controls of the ship' for the other sh- would not have much a chance
cause you can fit things between thin line's. phsyic'ly :lol: ohhhhh". i all ways wounder'd what cloud nine means and why the person is in such good spirits for a fairly long period of time and sober? what is going on with there f'n brain or serotonin must be sky high :? or what give's us the cloud nine in early recovery?

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2012 12:41 pm 
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I do everything my doctor wants me to do, but I don't do it for him, I do it for myself and that is:

Quit smoking. Which hasn't been fun especially right now. It's been a little hard even though its been almost 3 weeks. But lately I've just been feeling like I either need to go back to smoking or take more suboxone or something else. It's aggravating but in time, I'm sure it'll get easier.

Go to meetings. I am mixed on meetings but I do go. It's good to have gotten out of the rehab center that holds pretty much half of the meetings in the area and that I had such a good experience in treatment there that it's good running into old people and seeing them alive and well. Then again with meetings, I'm also careful who I tell I'm on suboxone. Some people are ignorant.

Not use any drugs whatsoever. Or drink. Pretty obvious. I get drug tested. Usually once a month, sometimes less. The only thing I sometimes miss is tripping which was my favorite before I got into pills but in some ways I'm glad the pills came a long because I was really worried about turning my brain into lysergic oatmeal for a while there.

AODA Therapy. This one I actually have been doing since I was 14 and will probably NEVER STOP DOING! I actually want to go. My counselor is awesome and she's been seeing me for 8 years. So its great having that long-term attachment there.

Other then that, I don't really go to support groups and I don't think there are any in reasonable distance but I'd like too. I wish there was an actual suboxone support group but I can see where there'd be issues.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2012 9:32 pm 
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healingwaters wrote:
Quit smoking. Which hasn't been fun especially right now. It's been a little hard even though its been almost 3 weeks. But lately I've just been feeling like I either need to go back to smoking or take more suboxone or something else. It's aggravating but in time, I'm sure it'll get easier.


:D I know exactly how this feels. I'm 30 days off cigarettes today and I agree that there's a big link between smoking and Suboxone, and using other opioids. Since quitting smoking and losing that crutch, I've felt a few more cravings for other drugs surface. It's as if I'm used to a certain level of stimulation from drugs, be they cigarettes, heroin, cocaine or suboxone, and once I take one away I try to make up for it with others.

Instead I've returned to the swimming pool and am back swimming 2kms every couple of days. This is so important to my recovery. The feeling after getting out of the pool after a good swim is like using drugs, except it's healthy. There's something so meditative and rhythmic about it.

When I think of using drugs of any kind, I think of the health I will lose and how much it will hit my capacity to swim, even if it's for a few days.

Good luck with the smoking. How far are you done now?


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 9:55 am 
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Swimming actually sounds like a good healthy alternative right now, especially with the way you described it. I wanted to take up running but I don't think it's for me. I might have to hit up the swimming pool now though. : )

It's been a little over 3 weeks now since I quit smoking but only 5 days since I gave up nicotine gum. mmmm nicotine gum, that sounded really good right now. See how are minds work? Thing is, I started smoking at 16 and quit when I was 19 for 3 years using nicotine gum as well. Then, I ended up in rehab for them fourth time since I was 15 (I'm now 22) back in March of this year and since smoking was what just about everyone did there to socialize and vent and I was extremely angry at the time, I started up again. Which was stupid. Then a few months later I was accepted into the suboxone program and my doctor psuhed me into quitting, which wasn't a big deal because I wanted to anyway before I smoked for longer, wasting more money and becoming even more nicotine-dependant. I still think about starting again sometimes but it's just not worth it.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 10:49 pm 
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Well done you're doing great. I always found the nicotine gum / lozenge / inhaler thingos became a crutch in themselves. That's why I prefer patches. Just start off on the right dose, then when you're comfortable cut them a lil bit smaller each day.

A friend's dad used to chew nicotine gum 20 years after he quit smoking! But hey ... it doesn't have any harmful effects to your health ... kinda reminds me of Suboxone like that.

Swimming is great. When you get out of the pool it's like you're in this bubble and nothing can touch you. But it can take me a few hundred metres before I start to get into the groove.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 11:00 pm 
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I quit cigs in Jan 2010 after a bad sinus infection. I was so sick I didn't feel like smoking at all and figured I'd already gone a few days w/o them why not just quit. One of the best days of my life. I've had a cig here and there during a night out but it's really rare and I've never wanted to start smoking again. I was surprised I was able to quit cigs before subs but I did it. :)


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