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 Post subject: What is addiction?
PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 2012 8:32 am 
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What, exactly, constitutes addiction? Personally, I feel that for instance using (hypothetically) 4 mg buprenorphine, daily, for fun as well as for pain relief (orally or IV) is not an addiction until 4 mg becomes 8 then 16 in a short period of time. Addictions are, in my world, unmanageable. If you go to the doctor fortnightly, get your pills, and don't run out (even have a bunch left over) that isn't an addiction—is it?


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 2012 4:07 pm 
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Alot of people in this site seem to think since we now get it from the doctor now and don't run out we are not addicted. But dont be fooled we are just as addicted to when we were getting then illegally. It's just cheaper and always available so it keeps are life in order so some think they are not addicted. Stop taking you suboxone right now an see what happens, that is addiction my friend. Enjoy the subs, dot worry about addictionvs not addicted


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 2012 6:54 pm 
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Addiction is not a drug, or medication, it is the uncontrollable behavior and the physiological changes in our brains that cause those behaviors. Look up substance-use disorder in the DSM-IV-TR, addiction is a mental illness. Physical dependency to a drug, or medication, is completly different then addiction. Steve


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 2012 9:18 pm 
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^^^ That's exactly what I was going to say. Addiction can apply to just about anything. Typically, when an addict or alcoholic stops using then that person replaces their using with something else, like eating or just about anything else, just like the game whack-a-mole. But as far as being 'addicted' to buprenorphine, I'm not sure if that's the right word. Being dependent would be the correct term as long as you are taking the medication like it is intended, versus using the drug to get a high, such as snorting it, even though the effects won't be any different you could still be abusing it in another form. Just because one may get withdrawal effects from buprenorphine doesn't mean you are 'addicted' to it, similar to just about any other drug used long-term, like an antidepressant or drugs treated for something schizophrenia and diabetes.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 2012 9:41 pm 
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Fireman wrote:
^^^ That's exactly what I was going to say. Addiction can apply to just about anything. Typically, when an addict or alcoholic stops using then that person replaces their using with something else, like eating or just about anything else, just like the game whack-a-mole. But as far as being 'addicted' to buprenorphine, I'm not sure if that's the right word. Being dependent would be the correct term as long as you are taking the medication like it is intended, versus using the drug to get a high, such as snorting it, even though the effects won't be any different you could still be abusing it in another form. Just because one may get withdrawal effects from buprenorphine doesn't mean you are 'addicted' to it, similar to just about any other drug used long-term, like an antidepressant or drugs treated for something schizophrenia and diabetes.


It's not similar to any drug used long term,(except methadone)it's a scheduled narcotic, if you stop taking your diabetes drugs you won't go threw physical and mental withdraws and you won't crave the pill like suboxone.so your saying a person prescribed 3 OxyContin a day for pain for years and dosent abuse them isn't addicted because they take then properly?


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 2012 10:02 pm 
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Exactly, they would be physically dependent, not addicted. Steve


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 2012 10:07 pm 
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stp747 wrote:
Exactly, they would be physically dependent, not addicted. Steve



What is the difference between physically dependent an addicted?


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 06, 2012 3:20 am 
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Not every drug has the same withdrawal effects so it isn't fair to say that just because you don't get the same withdrawal with diabetes meds as buprenorphine there isn't withdrawal symptoms. Your body is definitely dependent on the insulin that you are getting from the meds and if one was to suddenly stop taking it, that person would go through withdrawal symptoms adjusting.

In the scenario you made, if you take 3 oxycodone pills a day for the reason it is prescribed and not seeking the drug for the high. They are similar terms, but also very different. Just because someone might go through withdrawal symptoms doesn't mean you are addicted. Someone could be dependent on a drug but not addicted and someone could be addicted to a drug and dependent at the same time. Abusing the drug for its recreational effects is showing drug seeking behavior that you are not only taking the drug for its original purpose, but taking it as prescribed assuming it isn't some absurd amount of pills that is unnecessary wouldn't make you addicted. It doesn't seem like what anyone says will change your mind, but that is what my understanding is on the terms.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 06, 2012 3:53 am 
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Fireman wrote:
Not every drug has the same withdrawal effects so it isn't fair to say that just because you don't get the same withdrawal with diabetes meds as buprenorphine there isn't withdrawal symptoms. Your body is definitely dependent on the insulin that you are getting from the meds and if one was to suddenly stop taking it, that person would go through withdrawal symptoms adjusting.

In the scenario you made, if you take 3 oxycodone pills a day for the reason it is prescribed and not seeking the drug for the high. They are similar terms, but also very different. Just because someone might go through withdrawal symptoms doesn't mean you are addicted. Someone could be dependent on a drug but not addicted and someone could be addicted to a drug and dependent at the same time. Abusing the drug for its recreational effects is showing drug seeking behavior that you are not only taking the drug for its original purpose, but taking it as prescribed assuming it isn't some absurd amount of pills that is unnecessary wouldn't make you addicted. It doesn't seem like what anyone says will change your mind, but that is what my understanding is on the terms.


This makes a lot more sense I guess I don't no it's all so confusing really am I addicted or not in sweden it's legal heroin now for addiction where doctors administer people their daily dose of heroin so are they addicted or not who knows if heroin were legal here for pain and we took it as prescribe would we be addicted it can go on and on but im happy and living good on suboxone all that matters really


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