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PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2012 4:31 pm 
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I have been on subutex my whole pregnancy, and the last script was changed back to suboxone. Will the suboxone hurt my baby so late in pregnancy? And, will it affect my milk, labor, etc. Im so nervous and scared for my unborn child. please help and support, Thank you!


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2012 5:56 pm 
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So at 40 weeks you must be coming to the very end of your pregnancy. Maybe the thought was to have you start on the Suboxone after the baby is born. Or maybe it was simply an oversight. Either way, contact you doc and find out. Most docs do keep pregnant women on Subutex until after the birth. But don't stress yourself out about it. Just get in touch with the doc ASAP. Hope you will come back and share your story after the baby is born.
I wish you the best,
Lilly


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2012 5:59 pm 
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I'm sorry that I can't answer you with any certainty, but I hope someone comes along who can. I do have a couple educated guesses that might ease your mind a bit.

First of all, I haven't seen any studies on the effects of Naloxone during pregnancy/breastfeeding. The addition of Naloxone is the only difference between Subutex and Suboxone. Since there have been no studies, I think that the general attitude is "better safe than sorry", and that's why they would want to prescribe a medication with fewer drug components. I think that drugs in general are more likely to have an effect on a developing embryo/fetus than on a full-term baby, so I don't think you have to worry about Naloxone causing any kind of defect. I can't think of a reason that Naloxone would affect labor, delivery, or breastfeeding.

The only way I can imagine Naloxone affecting your baby is if your baby is dependent on the buprenorphine in Suboxone, and if the Naloxone in the Suboxone were to cause the baby to withdraw, which is a risk of buprenorphine itself. However, if the medical staff notices major withdrawal symptoms in your baby, they will likely treat the baby with morphine to relieve his or her discomfort.

There are many stories of healthy, beautiful babies born of Suboxone/Subutex dependent mothers here on the forum. I know it's normal to be anxious about the health of your baby in normal circumstances, and it's even harder when there are added factors. Please try, for your baby's sake, not to be stressed out in the last few days of your pregnancy.

I wish you all the best,

Amy

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2012 8:01 pm 
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Hi there,
congrats on the baby :wink:
Be sure and TRY to read the advice you've already gotten with an open mind, meaning,
sounds good to me!! but I dont know how YOU feel about any of it....

Either way,,, here's an artical I think ALL pregnant women should read


Withdrawal in newborns: Lay off the guilt trip!!

by J T Junig on February 1, 2010






I will share some thoughts that I left at a discussion at a ‘linked in’ group about addiction. I was responding to someone who was equating addiction and physical dependence in a baby born to an opiate-addicted mother. My feeling is that such women are given way too much of an attitude by the nurses and others who care for them, and that was the motivation behind my response. Read on:

There are many differences between physiological dependence and addiction to substances. For example, people who take effexor are dependent– and will have significant discontinuation-emergent side effects– but they are not ‘addicted’, which consists of a mental obsession for a substance. The same is true of beta-blockes, in that discontinuation results in rebound hypertension, but there is no craving for propranololol when it is stopped abruptly.



We have no idea of the ‘cravings’ experienced by a newborn, but I cannot imagine a newborn having the cortical connections required to experience anything akin to the ‘cravings’ experienced by opiate addicts, which consist of memories of using and positive reinforcement of behavior—things that are NOT part of the experience ‘in utero’.
It is also important to realize that the withdrawal experienced by addicts consists of little actual ‘pain’ (I’ve been there—I know). Addicts talk about this subject often, as in ‘why do we hate withdrawal so much?’ It is not physical pain, but rather the discomfort of involuntary movements of the limbs , depression, and very severe shame and guilt. The NORMAL newborn already HAS such involuntary movements as the result of incomplete myelination of spinal nerve tracts and immature basal ganglia and cerebellar function in the brain. And the worst part of withdrawal—the shame and guilt and hopelessness—are not experienced in the same degree in a baby who has no understanding of the stigma of addiction!

Finally, if we look at the ‘misery’ experienced by a newborn, we should compare it to the misery experienced by being a newborn in general. I doubt it feels good to have one’s head squeezed so hard that it changes shape—yet nobody gets real excited about THAT discomfort—at least not from the baby’s perspective! I also doubt it feels good to have one’s head squeezed by a pair of forceps, and then be pulled by the head through the birth canal! Many hospitals still do circumcisions without local, instead just tying down the limbs and cutting. Babies having surgery for pyloric stenosis are often intubated ‘awake’, as the standard of care– which anyone who understands intubation knows is not a pleasant experience. And up until a couple decades ago—i.e. the 1980s (!), babies had surgery on the heart, including splitting open the sternum or breaking ribs, with a paralytic agent only, as the belief was that a baby with a heart defect wouldn’t tolerate narcotics or anesthetic. I don’t like making a baby experience the heightened autonomic activity that can be associated with abstinence syndrome, but compared to other elements of the birth experience, I know which I would choose!

My points are twofold, and are not intended to encourage more births of physiogically-dependent babies. But everyone in the field should be aware of the very clear difference between physiological dependence and addiction, as the difference is a basic principle that is not a matter of opinion—but rather the need to get one’s definitions right. Second, the cycle of addiction and shame has been well established, and there is already plenty of shame inside of most addicted mothers. If there are ten babies screaming loudly, only the whimper from the ‘addict baby’ elicits the ‘tsk tsk’ of the nurses and breast feeding consultants. My first child was born to a healthy mom years before my own opiate dependence, and he never took to breast feeding; he his mother been an addict, his trouble surely would have been blamed on ‘addiction’ or ‘withdrawal’. Unfortunately even medical people see what they want to see—and sometimes that view needs to be checked for bias due to undeserved stigma—for EVERYONE’S good, baby included.
.
Read more at http://www.suboxonetalkzone.com/withdra ... mFJ2pUe.99

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anyone can give up,
its the easiest thing in the world to do, but to
hold it together, when everyone would understand if you fell apart
That's TRUE STRENGTH
http://almostoneyearclean.blogspot.com/


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2012 8:10 pm 
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And here's a few posts/stories from the pregnancy section.........

Hope this helps, and I hope everything goes really great for you



http://suboxforum.com/viewtopic.php?t=6591

http://suboxforum.com/viewtopic.php?t=7245

http://suboxforum.com/viewtopic.php?t=7431

_________________
anyone can give up,
its the easiest thing in the world to do, but to
hold it together, when everyone would understand if you fell apart
That's TRUE STRENGTH
http://almostoneyearclean.blogspot.com/


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2012 4:48 pm 
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I am now, taking this suboxone, for reals. No more plain bupe cause it was making me entirley too sick and i couldnt eat anything! I was 39 plus when i started the suboxone, so im sure not defect will happen to my baby, however, he doesnt move as much and im taking a little bit more of the suboxone than the plain bupe. Is this bad? Is somthing wrong? and i heard that this medication hinders breathing, do you think this will happen to my newborn! @ Lily, as soon as i have my child i will post how he is. Im sure things are going to be a little slow and scary at first! but id rather have myself on this medication, than to have my newborn withdrawing from what i was addicted to...fentanyl, morphine, methadone....etc etc... Wish me luck, I am very nervous and i should probably cut down my suboxone intake from 10mg to 2-4 mg? would this help at all? Thank you all for responding so quickly, it really does help and i am so blessed to have come along this forum! ive read so much insight and learned so much.


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Dr. Jeffrey Junig, M.D., Ph.D.

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