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PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 2:45 am 
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I'm an alcoholic and an opiate addict. I used both heavily for about ten years. Suboxone has stopped the opiate cravings but i still crave alcohol badly. Or i just want to get high on something, anything. So lately I've been playing with klonopin. I've asked my doctor if he could give me something for alcohol cravings and he prescribed naltrexone to go WITH my subs. Pure genius. Anyway, I've already failed a drug screening for benzos snd another failed test would mean being kicked out of the program. Essentially putting a bullet through my brain. Any advice on how to help these cravings? Possibly another medication? Or any thoughts on losing the desire to want to feel high in some wsy? I'm in an extremely risky and dangerous situation and would truly appreciate any advice at all.
Thank you all so much fkr your time and caring,
timothy


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 12:14 pm 
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HI TIMOTHY

first of all, the fact that you WANT to do something about this is GREAT.

have you thought at all about seeing an addiction therapist????
that may help get to the root of WHY you are wanting to get high??? it really helped me in the begining, or middle I guess maybe, get to the source of some deeply rooted issues.

second, I felt like there was this big huge HOLE in my life without getting high. becuz for a LONG TIME (10yrs) thats ALL my life revolved around!!!!
everything!!
and then Poof, its gone, no wonder, right?

Is there any extra curricular activities you can think you MIGHT want to try????
I mean, I know it kind of sounds like TRYING to replace one thing for another, and in a way, it is. BUT in a healthy way.
like, working out?
or riding a bike, playing on a softball team, ANYTHING will work really. its more like a distraction than anything, at least at first it will be.
im gonna buy a dirtbike or something in the very near future.
Just an example.

So think about that. becuase now that your not getting high every day, you can do ANYTHING you want???
thats how I look at it.
think about how much you've 'missed out' on , you know, and what do you wish you would have been able to do??
its never too late.
a college degree???
Im just throwing things out there.

meditation, is something I just started reading/learning about as well. and I think its a GREAT tool, and not really that hard to learn.
the more ways we know of to deal with cravings, especially without turning to a 'substitute' drug, the BETTER
http://www.seattleinsight.org/Talks/Bro ... fault.aspx


GOOD LUCK, and welcome

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anyone can give up,
its the easiest thing in the world to do, but to
hold it together, when everyone would understand if you fell apart
That's TRUE STRENGTH
http://almostoneyearclean.blogspot.com/


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 1:41 pm 
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Amber,
Thank you for the reply. First of all, it's funny you mention a college degree. I'm in the process of getting back into school right now. I have been working out and taking walks everyday. Basically just to get back into good shape, as ten years of drug abuse tends to leave a person pretty out of shape. My goal is to gain 20 lbs.
I do feel like I need a hobby, preferably something outdoors. I just don't know if that's really going to fill that hole. Guess we will find out.
And like i said, the suboxone is working. I'm not craving opiates, only alcohol. Meditation is something I tried when I was younger and rather enjoyed it. Maybe it's time to give it another go. From what you're saying and from what I've been told by others, it sounds like my best chance is just to distract the cravings away.
I wish there was an easier answer but it took a lot of work to get into this predicament so it shouldn't be simple to get out of it, right?
Again, thank you for your ideas. I truly appreciate it.
Timmy


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 1:57 pm 
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Thats so funny, becuase I always tell myself
"if it were easy to put it all back together, we'd never stay on the right path for long at all"

Does that make sense???

although, it IS amazing how soon it all DOES kinda work out. I mean 14 months ago I had nothing. My husband was "letting"
me sleep in the car. So I could still see my son. But I really had NOTHING. And I had burned every bridge that led anywhere.

Now, 14 months later, Ive held a job for a year, and might be getting a better one, we are moving next week into a better place, and I got my teeth fixed.
I mean these are all HUGE things. And yes, a few weeks ago I was feeling hopeless, and like I had been banging my head agianst a wall for 14 months....getting nowhere.
Its wierd, how it all just 'comes together' in ONE week. but I'm NOT complaining!!!!!

theres no way in HELL I would have been able to do this without suboxone, and my support network of family and friends. Some of which I met right on the this very forum.

I think distraction IS key, and so is, "having something to LIVE for"
something to look forward to, something to put forth your effort in to. If that makes sense?

AND, its still NOT easy, I mean if if wer easy, people wouldnt be living on the streets (or in thier car!) to support thier drug habit, right?
Anyways, I still have hard days. But they do get better, and the thought of catching a nod now, is not quite as romantic as it was a year ago. Maybe becuz I know all the things Ive worked so hard for would be gone in the blink of an eye.

alcohol was never really 'my' thing. when I was younger, yes. but the only time I drank really in adult life is when Id be like day 5 of withdrawl from dillaud/methadone/whatever and I was so panicky I couldnt stand myself!! and NO it never helped, lol
I can totallly see how it could be a challenge, though.

So anyways buddy, ONWARD and UPWARD we go!!!!!!!
keep your head up, I think you can do this!!!!

_________________
anyone can give up,
its the easiest thing in the world to do, but to
hold it together, when everyone would understand if you fell apart
That's TRUE STRENGTH
http://almostoneyearclean.blogspot.com/


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 30, 2013 2:57 pm 
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Tim, have you ever considered just smoking a joint? Pot, I've found, is just about the only drug that can be used regularly without any adverse effects. Certainly not physically, and mentally, yes, perhaps there is an aspect of habituation there, as with anything anyone does many times over(eating habits, drinking cofee, anything). However, if used in a beneficial way, meaning as a responsible adult, and recovering addict, marijuana can be an invaluable tool in addiction recovery. Not because it satisfies some craving to get high, but because it tends to shift the mind to throughts of the future, and how I want to live my life, and how I will do that without using again. Introspective. This is me personally but I know this effect is not individual. It's all about your perspective on pot. If you belive it's going to throw you right back into addiction, then don't smoke it. It's certainly not for every recovering addict. But I belive the right state of mind, and responsible use can result in very thereputic effects. I also belive alot of people that relapse, use pot as an excuse as to why they have started using again. Or as to why they are lazy and unmotivated and blah blah blah. Just the same as some people blame suboxone for their shortcomings. That sort of reasoning will never get you anywhere obviously. But in conclusion, I would say if you still have that nagging feeling to be intoxicated, you probably need to do some work on your state of mind and attitude(no offense) because thats something you'll have to overcome to stay clean. But, like I said, a few tokes may just help that proscess along. :) Good luck man!


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 30, 2013 5:36 pm 
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Hey Tim,

I just had to comment here because I am dealing with the cravings too. My situation is different because I AM craving the opiates again now due to my tapering. I am almost off the subs, down to 1.5mg now. The cravings are the hardest part. I went to a clinical psychologist last week, not an addiction specialist. Pretty much his only suggestion was to find a hobby. He told me I should go back to school as well. The rational side of my brain recognized it as a good idea, something to fill my time and take my mind off the cravings...gives me a future goal to work for. But the addict side of my brain wanted to laugh in his face and then punch him in the nose for good measure! It's just not the answer we want to hear when we are looking for something to take those cravings away! I don't know what the answer is...I think it will be different for each person. I started smoking again this week after 13 years of not smoking. See what the cravings will do to you? I know it wasn't a great decision, but it kept me from using extra sub or taking 3 ambien before bed or picking up the phone to call an old contact. To me it was the better trade off. I know I need to find something else to cope with it, I just haven't figured out what that is yet.

I hope you do...there are alot of us here going through the same thing. If you find your something let us know!


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 31, 2013 12:30 am 
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You all need to start looking at the dates of these posts. He is long gone by now although it would be nice if he popped in again to say hi.

Rule

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 01, 2013 4:00 pm 
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Well regardless of the dates, I am curious to know more about Cutty's theory of pot-smoking for addiction treatment.
I am wondering what your thoughts are on how this could possibly help with anxiety related to suboxone "treatment"...would it help?
I have never heard anything suggest smoking pot for addiction help before...in fact on the many detoxes and treatment programs I have been in, they always blamed Pot for leading to other drugs. Just curious if you have any scientific evidence to support this, or if it just your experience and opinion. Thanks in advance!


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:44 pm 
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Hi J-dear,

Pot is a bit unique in that it can either make a person extra anxious and unsettled or it can help quite a bit in that area. For me, it doesn't work. I haven't liked it since I was a teenager, but I know a handful of people that have used it successfully as a tool to detox off of harder drugs. My husband is one of them. It calmed his nerves, relaxed his body and helped him to sleep better. He is not the type to sit around and smoke all day. I'm strictly talking about using it only when necessary, like you would a medication. Back when he was detoxing, he would always try to get by without it first, and he would succeed a lot of the time, but there were occasions when he needed help and pot would work. I think the key was using it sparingly.. and not building a tolerance to where he need more and often? IDK.. I do know that it really helps some people.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 02, 2013 4:25 am 
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Your theory is quite intriguing and I completely agree with tinydancer and everything she said was spot on.

It's definitely a drug whose benefits or detriments vary from person to person. I could see it being extremely helpful to help manage the withdrawals, similar to something like valium. On the flip side, it could be harmful if the smoking pulled you back into addiction. I don't find marijuana addictive, nor do I really enjoy it, but the activities surrounding the drug like buying off the street, taking part in illegal activities, and being around others using for non-medicinal purposes, is worse.

This isn't quite the same but here's what I thought of: Heroin is to suboxone; as suboxone is to marijuana.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 02, 2013 11:29 am 
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Agreed fireman. You can't look at just the drug itself when measuring risk of problems in your recovery. Marijuana seems like a fairly harmless drug in comparison to opiates. I get it. But. Most of our problems in the end are due to our addictive behaviors and crazy behaviors. Not the drugs. So I have to agree with fireman. It's not so much the drug as it is the things that come with it. Like old friends, old hangouts, illegal activity, old dealers, buying something illegal, ect. All of these things cause euphoria in us addicts. That's just the way it is. So. Like I've always said.... Don't focus too hard on the drugs because you'll miss the important stuff. Seriously.




Good luck.

P.S
I think youre much better off not taking either drugs unless you absolutely feel like you are going to die without a little comfort. I jumped off 8mg after a year and didn't get any detox meds other than a natural sleep aid. So. It can be done. It's not easy. But it's very possible. Also. Don't take benadryl!!! It made my detox worse! Same way with caffeine. No no.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 02, 2013 1:36 pm 
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I hear you both.. I guess I don't view obtaining marijuana in the same light, though. I live in a place where you can just walk into a shop and buy marijuana like you can a starbucks coffee. The stigma surrounding marijuana is pretty much gone here. There is no meeting people on the streets or shady hangouts where I come from but I understand that isn't the case for everyone.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 02, 2013 2:18 pm 
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Perhaps its also the different strains/plants that cause different moods too. I never really enjoyed smoking pot either. And I really dont have any "hang outs" bad friends/etc...I was your typical doctor shopper/soccer mama on my last go round. I probably couldn't find a bag of dope if my life depended on it in this area. When I was a teenager, I remember I had to smoke it consistently for a few weeks to "get the benefits"...it seemed like if I hadn't smoked for a while, and then I all of a sudden smoked it was not enjoyable....I used to joke it was like Prozac and you had to build up your levels. Maybe there is some truth to that too? My husband would be overjoyed if I asked him for a joint., LOL..that is all he does, Mr. Straight as an Arrow.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 02, 2013 2:21 pm 
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See, thats the thing. Why is it okay for a resposible adult to go out and buy a 5th of alcohal and get intoxicated, but they are not allowed to smoke joint? Even though we all know that alcohol is physically and mentally harmful, very addictive and intoxicates one far more then pot does. I'm just using this old debate as an example of how assbackward the laws in this country are pertaining to certain things. You should not have to engage in the activity of "street drug buying" to obtain a simple plant. I belive anyone that wants to smoke, should simply grow 1 or two personal use only plants, and be done with it. That would eliminate all of the crime thats assosiated with the illegal marijuana trade. A trade, and a market that has been created by the government by the way. Now, as far as scientific evidence that pot helps with addiction: It doesn;t exist except perhaps on a very small, obscure scale. The government won't even allow studies on it's medical uses, even though it's already been proven by many very prestigious firms(American heart and lung assosciation/American Cancer Insititute, to name a few big ones) that pot has many many many beneficial uses againist some serious disease. We know it can shrink tumors, prevent cartain types of cancer, helps with aids, HepC, MS, ect. Many patients find they can stop, or greatly reduce the amount of painkillers they take because of pot. But just because these studies don't exist or are not made public, doesn;t mean any of these things are not true. Pot is not illegal because of some huge detremantal effects it has on society or human health or something. It's illegal because the government makes money off it being illegal, more so then they would by taxing it. Think about it, if some local police force starts a "marijuana task force" the feds will provide all sorts of resources to their police force. New cars, new uniforms, helicopters you name it. it's just one example of how they profit from fucking over respected, funtional members of society for smoking a bit of pot. It just boils my blood. Anyway, in conclusion I HIGHLY suggest you guys wanting info on the medicinal aspect of psycedellics and pot check out this site http://www.maps.org/ You will find alot of scientific info on it, more then I can provide in this post for sure.
We have to know our own bodies, and what will be good, and what will be bad for our own individual self. Thats why they say relapse is part of recovery, you have to get to know yourself, and how your addiction works in your own mind you know? That being said, marijuana has helped me. :)


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