It is currently Thu Aug 17, 2017 7:44 am



All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Our Sponsors





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 17 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Understanding the anger
PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 2010 11:32 am 
Offline
Average Poster
Average Poster
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 09, 2010 12:46 pm
Posts: 24
[font=Comic Sans MS]IMHO, the anger that comes from people knock our treatment is because they have not accepted the fact that: It is a chronic relapseable disease: It can be controlled with medication, take away the cravings and the need for the euphoria that so many people get from alcohol. The drug war cost this country billions of dollars, it was lost a long long time ago. But the government raise their glasses of twenty year old scotch but that's OK. It's legal, readily available, socially acceptable. Anger is an emotion that can be controlled, but not from people who don't understand. Now that MOST of the medical profession knows that it is a chronic disease, and can be put into remission, they take flack too. We must become proactive in the process for those who missed THE DISEASES OF ADDICTION 101...and educated the uneducated. I am very lucky to have a great doctor, and wonderful therapist, and I feel good too. I went to a lecture by Dr. Voklaw and I was blown out of my chair. She is a powerful speaker and uses visuals, now tell me, after going to one of her lectures are people going to walk out and say "they can stop if they want too", YEP they did. It's all about education and becoming proactive letting our body help us to regulate our emotions and improve our mood, enhance our mental health to go on and just do it. Use print outs, give them to your doctors or doctors that won't get a license to be a sub doctor too.[/font][/size]

_________________
NARF


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 2010 12:50 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 12:55 pm
Posts: 4933
Location: Leesburg, FL
Hi DarkEyes. I'm glad you brought this up again. We haven't talked about the whole "anger'' issue here in a while and I think it's an interesting subject. I hope you don't mind if we discuss this a little bit?

I do agree with most of your theory of why people are angry. However, you said: "Now that MOST of the medical profession knows that it is a chronic disease, and can be put into remission...". This in particular I'm not sure I agree with. Unfortunately I don't have the numbers as to exactly how much of the medical community believes addiction is a chronic illness requiring medical treatment. I believe that to be the case, as do many if not most of the people on this forum do. And yes, some doctors/medical personnel believe it, too. (It is a school of thought after all, not a fact.) But I'm just not sure that MOST of the medical community buy into the disease model. I would lean more toward less than half of them believe this concept, rather than "most". (I'm not nitpicking your words, I'm just trying to be clear in mine.)

I think regardless of their medical training/education, that there may be just as many medical personnel (if not more than) who actually disagree and believe that addiction is a personality issue that has to do with willpower and strength of character. I think if more medical people believed in the disease model that there would be better knowledge about suboxone, for one, and way less stigma attached to addiction, too.

I'd love to hear members of this community who are or were in the medical field and hear what their experience is on the subject (what's the percentage of doctors, etc who believe the disease model).

I also think there's another reason for the anger. That is, the angry ones are those who, for whatever reason, are not/cannot/will not be on a suboxone program. They believe they are working harder than we are on their recovery and that we are taking the easy way out. And I think this pisses them off!

Again, thanks for starting this thread and giving me/us the opportunity to discuss it and give our opinions. Anyone else?

_________________
-As I have grown older, I've learned that pleasing everyone is impossible, but pissing everyone off is a piece of cake.

-I'm only responsible for what I say, not for what you understand.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 2010 1:30 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2010 10:39 am
Posts: 4028
Location: Sitting at my computer
I think a lot of the anger/distrust from the health care arena is due to the fact that we addicts are all painted with the same brush. I mean from the cocaine addict to a marijuana addict to a heroin addict to an opiate addict...we're all the same to them and thanks to how the media portrays us as mindless stoners who are going to rob you, shoot you, come to your house and kid-nap you or get your children hooked on drugs. These are some extremely potent stereotypes that we have been saddled with. No one has ever seen a guy with hypertension robbing the elderly because of his hypertension, you don't see a person with parkinsons disease pointing a gun in your face demanding all your money...only if you're a drug addict do you behave like this...that is what we are taught socially anyway. I wonder if we of the addictive persuasion had never become addicted, would we think of addicts as we currently do or would we look down our noses at them too?? I'm certainly not saying it's right for people to view us as they do, but I guess I can understand it if I put myself in their shoes because this is what they have been taught to think their whole life.

Another thing I read somewhere was that most of these 'haters' believe it's our fault for becoming addicted. They cite the fact that we took that first hit of a joint, first line of blow, ate that first pain pill, knowing full well that we should not have. Therefore, due to our poor judgement we should suffer. This is obviously a ridiculous notion. Like any of them can say the never made a mistake in their life, never made some bad decisions that ended up costing them dearly.

Bottom line, addiction is horribly misunderstood and demonized by most. As long as this never changes, neither will the crappy attitudes and the anger.


Top
 Profile  
 
Our Sponsors
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 2010 1:40 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 12:55 pm
Posts: 4933
Location: Leesburg, FL
Excellent points, Romeo. You made me think of something else. Because of the stigma and discrimination of addiction, we addicts tend not to tell a lot of people about our addiction. I know I don't announce it and it's completely understandable. But because of this, there's a sort of "mystery" to addicts that exists. But when you think about it, there are so many addicts that most people have friends/family/coworkers/etc. in their life that they know personally who are addicts - they just don't know it! Therefore they don't equate a "normal", good person with a drug addict. They don't realize that anyone can be an addict and that addicts can still be good people. Unfortunately, it perpetuates the stigma and keeps us in the closet. Of course this doesn't mean I'm going to run over to my Facebook account and admit I'm an addict! Nope, not ready to to that. But don't you think that if we ALL did just that that that people would realize that addicts come in all shapes and sizes and actually ARE good people? And wouldn't that help to make the stigma eventually dissipate? Just a thought I had.

_________________
-As I have grown older, I've learned that pleasing everyone is impossible, but pissing everyone off is a piece of cake.

-I'm only responsible for what I say, not for what you understand.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 2010 3:38 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2010 10:39 am
Posts: 4028
Location: Sitting at my computer
Hatmaker

That's funny you mention that us addicts don't announce to everyone we know that we're addicts because while I was on lunch that exact sentiment hit me. If everyone knew the addicts in their life they would be astounded. Not all of us are dirty scum sucking losers like we are depicted. Hell, I'm a manager at a multi-million dollar company. Classic functioning addict. I outperform the non-addicts on a daily basis. I wish they all knew so I could watch their collective jaws hit the floor!

The only addicts who get outed are the ones who got busted for possesion or are going to jail for violent crimes. That's the source of the stigma...all addicts end up in jail. They can not be trusted.

Unfortunately, even if all of us addicts stood up and admitted the truth, we would still be outcasts because education is what is needed most here and it is just coming along so painfully slow. It will be decades and decades before public perception of addiction changes, if that quick. Changing public perception is like pushing molasses up a sandy hill, very hard to do. Fact is, when we're young and our moral compasses are set and our values are established, it then takes an enormous amount of data/education to change those closely guarded values and most individuals will not change their minds despite the overwhelming evidence to the contrary that addicts are not bad people. Public opinion will only change very slowly over time.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 2010 3:59 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2010 10:39 am
Posts: 4028
Location: Sitting at my computer
O.K., this subject has obviously touched a nerve with me, so here I go again...the stigma associated with addiciton is so entrenched that many of us addicts even believe we are losers!! How bad is that...not just the regular public thinks bad of us, but a great many of us addicts do too!!

To me, that is the greatest travesty here. Maybe if we addicts were better educated on addiciton and the brain we would be able to break the cycle earlier. For weeks now I have been toying with the idea of starting a new thread titled "What is Addiction?' in an effort to get some facts flowing to us who need it most. I firmly believe the more I know about my addiction the more power I have, kind of like Know Your Enemy.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 2010 4:30 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 12:55 pm
Posts: 4933
Location: Leesburg, FL
You're right, Romeo. The stigma from outside somehow does manage to seep within our own consciousness. And it's a damn shame. Education and knowledge IS power. I say you should start that thread you are thinking about. It can only have a positive outcome. I'll be looking for it.

_________________
-As I have grown older, I've learned that pleasing everyone is impossible, but pissing everyone off is a piece of cake.

-I'm only responsible for what I say, not for what you understand.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 2010 4:50 pm 
Offline
Average Poster
Average Poster
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 09, 2010 12:46 pm
Posts: 24
hatmaker510 wrote:
Excellent points, Romeo. You made me think of something else. Because of the stigma and discrimination of addiction, we addicts tend not to tell a lot of people about our addiction. I know I don't announce it and it's completely understandable. But because of this, there's a sort of "mystery" to addicts that exists. But when you think about it, there are so many addicts that most people have friends/family/coworkers/etc. in their life that they know personally who are addicts - they just don't know it! Therefore they don't equate a "normal", good person with a drug addict. They don't realize that anyone can be an addict and that addicts can still be good people. Unfortunately, it perpetuates the stigma and keeps us in the closet. Of course this doesn't mean I'm going to run over to my Facebook account and admit I'm an addict! Nope, not ready to to that. But don't you think that if we ALL did just that that that people would realize that addicts come in all shapes and sizes and actually ARE good people? And wouldn't that help to make the stigma eventually dissipate? Just a thought I had.


[size=12]I tend to agree with you both, for example, I was hit head on my a drunk driver at dawn, being Catholic I had the last rites and almost died. They could not stop the bleeding and could not operate because of this other disease I have, my platelets were to low, so they had to do an angiogram (sp) and cauterize the bleeders. Every bone in my body was fractured, and after two weeks the intern sent me home with no pain meds. I asked him if he missed the class "ADDICTION 101" and his remark was "I didn't go". But working as an advocate here in PA FOR A LONG TIME, I learned a couple of very interesting points. Some families have had addiction problems therefore are we predisposed to this? IMHO we are, I lost my niece to and overdose. If you work beside a person, and your on sub, there is no way they could tell you from Joe blow who is a stand up man in his community. Goes to church, is a deacon blah blah. Now if you tell this man you have a disease and its in remission, he may say "OH I"M SO SORRY" until you tell him what the remission is. And n/a meetings, don't even let the people know your disease is in remiss on you will be shunned. Again IMHO they don't work, after the meetings where do most of them go? I'll leave that one to the people who already know about n/a meetings and a/a meetings. Methadone works for the people who work the program, the potential for abuse of methadone is to strong for some people to just not abuse it. I ran into some people that time just stood still for, still on the methadone program, still in the cycle of addictive behavior, still asking me for money or pills or cigarettes. I had not seen them in two years and it was like time stood perfectly still for them. Good people too, just stuck in the cycle. Even if MOST of the medical profession sees this as a disease, but still looks down on us, stigmatize us, then it's up to us to educate them. Who else is going to do it? The government, I don't' think so. How do we finally get out of the stigma box, or do we just lie there and say, well I'm OK that's all I care about. NO, I"m glad that I found sub, I've talked to my family about it, they think I'm "normal" whatever the hell normal is :lol: No one on my f/b knows except one friend that I'm in remission, but she knows about addictive disease, she lived with an alcoholic for years. It's funny tho all these people have a gazillion friends, me 28 :wink:

_________________
NARF


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 2010 5:00 pm 
Offline
Average Poster
Average Poster
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 09, 2010 12:46 pm
Posts: 24
hatmaker510 wrote:
Hi DarkEyes. I'm glad you brought this up again. We haven't talked about the whole "anger'' issue here in a while and I think it's an interesting subject. I hope you don't mind if we discuss this a little bit?

I do agree with most of your theory of why people are angry. However, you said: "Now that MOST of the medical profession knows that it is a chronic disease, and can be put into remission...". This in particular I'm not sure I agree with. Unfortunately I don't have the numbers as to exactly how much of the medical community believes addiction is a chronic illness requiring medical treatment. I believe that to be the case, as do many if not most of the people on this forum do. And yes, some doctors/medical personnel believe it, too. (It is a school of thought after all, not a fact.) But I'm just not sure that MOST of the medical community buy into the disease model. I would lean more toward less than half of them believe this concept, rather than "most". (I'm not nitpicking your words, I'm just trying to be clear in mine.)

I think regardless of their medical training/education, that there may be just as many medical personnel (if not more than) who actually disagree and believe that addiction is a personality issue that has to do with willpower and strength of character. I think if more medical people believed in the disease model that there would be better knowledge about suboxone, for one, and way less stigma attached to addiction, too.

I'd love to hear members of this community who are or were in the medical field and hear what their experience is on the subject (what's the percentage of doctors, etc who believe the disease model).

I also think there's another reason for the anger. That is, the angry ones are those who, for whatever reason, are not/cannot/will not be on a suboxone program. They believe they are working harder than we are on their recovery and that we are taking the easy way out. And I think this pisses them off!

Again, thanks for starting this thread and giving me/us the opportunity to discuss it and give our opinions. Anyone else?


Your perfectly right on all points, numbers would be hard to come up with UNLESS you canvas an area where you live. I don't know if we will ever be let out of the stigma box, but were getting there slowly but surely and that's where the education come in for us, to become proactive. I'm very passionate about this because I for one am sick and tired of the medical profession looking at us as though we grew a third eye. There is no easy way out from a chronic disease. If they had to use and inhaler every day, would we say, OH THROW THAT AWAY YOU CAN DO IT. NOPE.

_________________
NARF


Top
 Profile  
 
   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 17, 2010 2:21 pm 
Offline
Average Poster
Average Poster
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 09, 2010 12:46 pm
Posts: 24
I absolutly hate the word STIGMA. Re reading this thread make me angry that the general public still thinks we can stop if we want to, not the truth that we have a desease. If we don't become procative in education who will for us? zippo that's who. Count me in.

_________________
NARF


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 17, 2010 3:23 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2010 10:39 am
Posts: 4028
Location: Sitting at my computer
I copied this over from another thread, it seems to fit in here a little better.

I guess the question that comes up in my mind every time I hear 'is being on Suboxone an addiction or a dependecy', or 'haven't you traded one addiction for another' is who the hell cares. So what if it is trading one addiction for another, the VAST majority of people I have experience with on Suboxone are fully functioning, productive members of society. Sure, there are a number of them who buy it off the street or abuse it and don't have jobs, but then again there is no social class in the world who don't have their losers to deal with. Most Suboxone users have found a stability that was previously lacking in their life and I think it's fine, no I think it's freaking awesome.

To me, it's like telling the guy with an amputateed leg that when he uses his prosthetic leg that he is cheating...he is not all natural. Only when he hops around on one leg is he truly clean? Can you imagine yourself ever saying that to someone.

It's funny because when I first quit sub I was a venom spitting, foul mouthed sub hater. I thought all the long term sub users were cheating and it drove me nuts because I felt they should have to suffer through withdrawal like I did. It wasn't fair! They're not clean, they are still on drugs. Then I realized it was all my own jealousy. I was pissed because they weren't being made to suffer like I had to. All of these thoughts revolved around ME and my intersts, never did I stop and put their interests first. Not until about a month ago when I finally had the realization that sub saved me. It took 3 damn years on it, but it finally got to the point where I was comfortable quitting. Now, who am I to say you can only be on it 3 years or 4 years or 10 years or 20 years. Just because it worked for me in 3 years don't mean jack shit about how long it will take someone else. If they want to stay on it for life and can remain productive members of society then I'm all for it.

So ask yourself, do you disagree with long term sub use because you are worried or concerned for that person OR does it bother the shit out of you that you are clean and they haven't had to suffer to get 'clean' yet. I know that's how my warped mind worked for a while.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2010 12:57 am 
Offline
Super Poster
Super Poster
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2010 11:47 am
Posts: 130
i feel like what im about to post kind of relates to several threads but im posting it on this one cause i cant decide where to put it. anyways, i really feel like alcoholics, and opiate users, and ampthetamine users looking at each other differently. This is coming from my personal experience: there is a hierarchy within every addictive substance. For instance: the people who ONLY snorted pills looked down on the people who shoot up as junkies. People who get their scripts from a pill pusher dr and dont by off teh street look at people buying drugs as addicts, but they look at themselves as someone who is normal who takes their script eventhough they are taking 15 perk 30's a day and 10 oxys (random number lol). i thought i could stop whenever i wanted to for the first 3 years of my addiction (it lasted four years). i thought well i dont wanna stop now, i like it, but i can stop whenever, kind of like a smoker saying they can quit when they want to. During this period of mass denial i talked shit about people who went to rehab. Now that i have been to inpatient treatment and through the ringer i look back and think how judgemental i was. So, if addicts are judgemental, it makes sense that the general public would be even more judgmental of us. I personally have always said that i think it would be really tough to be an alcoholic, simply because alcohol is everywherr. I hate drinking, i drink once a month max and have one or two drinks, but people i go to AA meetings with cant even go to a bar to hang out. So in order to understand this i think.....what if instead of alcohol bars served pills, and pills were the norm, they sold them in the store and everyone in society had one a day to relax............well i realized that shit would be even harder then it was on me. I think it just takes alevel of understanding and putting yourself in someone elses shoes and some people dont have the ability to see things from the other side of fence.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 25, 2011 9:15 pm 
Offline
Average Poster
Average Poster

Joined: Thu Feb 24, 2011 4:40 pm
Posts: 18
Romeo wrote:
Hell, I'm a manager at a multi-million dollar company.


I'm a mathematics professor. My addiction started with a car accident. I'd never been exposed to opiates before and I was astonished to find that the seemed to cure my depression. Of course, I tried to get more and felt very smart for some time as I took my poppy tea... that is, until I realized that I could not stop even as the tea was starting to slowly destroy my health and I think my mind as well.

But the point is it can happen to anyone. I'm the girl in college who would not touch the bong if I ran in to one at a party. I follow rules, I take care of my body etc.

I'm still an addict.

Anyone who says its just willpower is wrong. I need help.

I think I would be fired in my job ever found out, only my husband and my doctor know...

But I know I'm not the only one-- the folks in my group are very nice people, from all walks of life. There are a few little gang bangers, but there are also devoted mothers, artists and people I'd trust to watch my niece.

And the worst part is that in seeking help I open myself up to the danger of being found out!


Top
 Profile  
 
   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 26, 2011 10:03 am 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 16, 2010 2:20 pm
Posts: 635
The stigma attached to addiction and alcoholism is a combination of ignorance and apathy. I have many, many "online friends" (people who post on message boards that I either administer or am a member at) who know my whole, sordid life story.

1. Physically, emotionally and sexually abused as a child
2. Sought relief in drugs and alcohol as an adolescent and teenager
3. Got addicted to heroin as a young adult
4. Went to prison for almost two decades as a result of #1, #2 and #3

Many of my friends are not addicts. They are what I call "earth people." :) Regular folks, some of whom drink a little bit here and there, socially, of course, and some of whom may even smoke a little Maryjane from time to time as well, but for the most part they are not addicts.

I don't meet people and say, "Hi, I'm an addict" but eventually, if you get to know me, you'll find out I'm a recovering addict. So, what's interesting is how peoples attitudes change when they find out that I'm an addict. I've seen people say "oh, junkies are just weak-minded people" on one day, and then on the very next day, because they've heard my story, say, "addiction is a disease that requires ongoing treatment to address."

Ignorance and apathy. Ignorance, because they just don't know any better and apathy because they can't be bothered to get information about it, but once someone they know has exposed themselves as an addict, and they see that not all addicts are criminal scum bags out robbing old ladies for their social security checks, and are in fact people who have an illness that manifests itself in several ways (including serious impulse control problems)....well, attitudes tend to change with enlightenment.

I have personally changed the attitudes of many, many people, because I live my life in a way that is hopefully a good example to other addicts. People who are not addicts look at where I've come from and where I am now and they are, frankly, perplexed. How does a guy who spent almost two decades in prison for armed robbery end up running an I.T. department at a huge company with the respect and admiration of his family, friends, coworkers and the community at large? That's not what an addict is! RIGHT?

WRONG.

Addicts are people. People with an illness that is devastating to their physical, emotional and (for some) spiritual well being. Until more people are educated about what addiction really is, it will continue to be stigmatized. If we, as addicts, continue to recover, maybe, eventually, some day, the stigma will be reduced.

Remember how people felt about AIDS when it was brand new? If you had AIDS people would literally RUN AWAY from you. No one would even touch you. Ignorance.

Now, because we've learned more about it, we know that you can touch a person with AIDS and not catch it. The stigma has been greatly reduced because the public has been well educated about the illness. Until or unless that same level of education is made available to the public about addiction, the stigmatization of addicts will continue.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 12:50 am 
Offline
Super Poster
Super Poster
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2011 5:36 am
Posts: 138
The drug laws are so jacked up in this country. There are more people locked up because of drugs and they are doing serious time. If the government made the thrill of the chase less appealing by regulating all substances I think that would destroy the black market. How is it ethical that it is easier for your 15 year old to walk down and buy a balloon of Herion and spend ten years locked up because of it? The truth is jail is big business and privatized jails is modern slavery. They have to keep the jails filled. They probaly get mega amounts of income each year per inmate. If drugs and the laws went the way of decriminalization there gies the income of greedy companies. Wall street trades on how many folks are locked up. The drug war will never be won and I don't think the government wants it to be won. Take alcohol you need ID to purchase. Even if marijuana was decriminalized and regulated and taxed it would make billions of revenue and I believe drive away the black market and the apeall on teens at least till they come of age. You know after you turn 21 it's not such a big deal. After all a dealer doesn't ask for ID when they sell to your kids.

_________________
Opportunity may only knock once but temptation leans on the doorbell...


Snake


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Mar 16, 2011 5:00 pm 
Offline
Power Poster
Power Poster
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 06, 2011 10:48 pm
Posts: 65
Location: South Jersey
[font=Century Gothic] [/font] * HatMaker* You said that you would like to see someone who has worked in the healcare proffession weigh in with thier opinions as to the amount of the medical community that truly understands the disease of addiction as well as the medications that are used to treat the disease of addiction...Well I am a Paramedic and sadly in my opinion and in my experience you have it pegged with your 50/50 scale. In alotof the ER's I work in your lucky of you find 2/10 doctors in the ER who arent going to treat my overdoses that i bring in like absolue scumbags once I leave knowing that i will not tolerate it in my presence. As well as the the nurses. I see alot more nurses who treat addicts pporly actually than doctors in the emergency setting. Now on the other hand in my experience the fields that seem to have the best handle and knowlede of addiction as well as compassion for addicts are in my behavioral health centers that ive takenn my patients to. There your more likely to see one or two doctors out of ten who arent completely understanding and compassionate. And the behavioral center RN's in my experience seem to be some of the best around, extremely rare in my experience to find a nurse in that setting mistreating an addicted patient. And for some reason that i dont fully understand the Trauma surgeons actually seem to have a pretty good handle and understanding of addiction as long as the patient was honest with the MEDIC (Me) on scene so that i could give them adequate pain management they never seem to have any ill feelings towards continuing high doses of analgesics. Hope that helped...

_________________
~The Heart Can Heal While Earthbound...The Soul Can Only Heal From Home.~ *MYSTERIVAMP*


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 16, 2011 9:06 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 12:55 pm
Posts: 4933
Location: Leesburg, FL
Thanks, mysteri, I was afraid of that. The lack of education about addiction within the medical community is stunning. Reckitt Benckiser sure doesn't help the situation by failing to do any education about suboxone whatsoever. Many medical personnel hear we're on sub and think we're still using addicts trying to get high rather than people in recovery/remission. That alone I attribute to RB not doing what all the other pharmaceutical companies do in educating doctors about a medication. But that's just a tiny portion of it. The discrimination against addicts, even with education, will take a very long time to overcome. Thanks for the input.

_________________
-As I have grown older, I've learned that pleasing everyone is impossible, but pissing everyone off is a piece of cake.

-I'm only responsible for what I say, not for what you understand.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 17 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Our Sponsors
Suboxone Forum latest topics RSS feed Subscribe to the entire forum
 

 

 
Fond Du Lac Psychiatry
Dr. Jeffrey Junig, M.D., Ph.D.

  • Board Certified Psychiatrist
  • Asst Clinical Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group