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PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2012 5:43 pm 
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Hi everyone,,,
awhile back I posted this article I found online, when someone asked about Rapid Detox.
here on the forum,, we've only had ONE suboxone/rapid detox SUCESS story
it's here.... so you don't have to DIG.......(your welcome) :wink:
http://suboxforum.com/viewtopic.php?p=5 ... ght=#56879


OKAY,,,, I didn't want to 'discount' that we did have ONE, story..... so Im not sure if it WORKS or NOT for suboxone users,
in general.........the "jury's still out" for me, and most people I believe.
WE DO HOWEVER, get LOTS of questions about it, and I can see why,,, it costs THOUSANDS of $$$$$
a small price to pay, MANY of US would say, to "wake up opiate-free"

So, here's the link to the article I found, and Im now, going to paste it, below the link...........
Thanks for reading...... (making this a sticky, since I got more than one request to do so after posting it before)
if ANYONE reading this is considering this "route" please DO YOUR RESEARCH you've got nothing to lose, by learning
as MUCH as possible, about where you want to go.......................
GOOD LUCK TO ALL MY FELLOW OPIATE ADDICTS,,,,, (recovering or not-quite-ready)

http://www.itsalljunk.net/5-things-you- ... pid-detox/


6 Things You Should Know About Rapid Detox

10/03/2012 By Eliza Player


Rapid opiate detoxification clinics speckle the Internet, selling the buyer a “painless detox from opiates,” making wild claims that the addict will “be back to normal in a matter of days!” This ever-popular treatment for opiate dependence claims to have the “magic pill” that can end your nightmare of addiction virtually overnight. As a recovering opiate addict, I am well aware of the work that goes into recovery long after the detoxification process has finished. And as a wary consumer, I am always leery of the “magic pill” that seems too good to be true. In my experience, when something is too good to be true, it usually is not. Long-term recovery from opiate addiction takes a lot of effort and hard work, and there is no “magic pill,” to date, anyway.

Rapid opiate detoxification has steadily grown in popularity, as more and more people search for this quick fix. As an addict, we become accustomed to the quick fix, hardly realizing there really is no quick fix for addiction. Rapid opiate detoxification shows no concrete evidence to be any more effective at treating opiate addiction than other methods, and some would even argue it is less effective. To further complicate matters, this method can be dangerous to certain patients, not to mention that it is incredibly hard on the addict’s already worn body.

Like many of us, I Googled rapid opiate detoxification when I first raised questions about this method. Interestingly enough, the first twenty sources of information on Google came directly from these opiate detoxification providers, which led me to dig a little further. Thankfully, my journalism training has taught me to always look at your source to determine how reliable the information is. The clinics that provide rapid detox are going to be supportive of this treatment, and they will be willing to leave out some important details in order to gain your business. Rapid opiate detoxification is a business, and a big business at that! The primary goal of these clinics’ web presence is to attract customers.

These rapid opiate detoxification centers rave about the success of this method, and their “success” is backed up with a number of personal testaments. But, alas, there really are no statistics, or facts used to back up any of these wild claims. Upon digging a little deeper, I found that most of the studies related to rapid opiate detoxification only tracked these patients for 6 months following the procedure to determine the success of their program. If you ask me, the first two years of my recovery were the hardest, the period where I was most vulnerable, and I would argue that following these patients for a mere six months is not a very good indication of long-term success.

Rapid opiate detoxification is a medically supervised detox, where they accelerate the detoxification process by intravenously pumping the body with naltrexone, which is an opiate agonist. This drug works to rapidly dispel all the opiates from their receptors in your brain, thus cramming the detoxification period into a matter of hours. The quicker that the opiates are removed from one’s brain, the more intense the withdrawal symptoms will be. As a result, rapid detoxification is done while the patient is asleep, under heavy anesthesia.

These rapid opiate detoxification websites offer a quick and painless withdrawal, a sort of “magic pill,” if you may. Having been opiate-free for five years, I do not believe there is any “magic pill” to deal with addiction. Recovering from an addiction takes a lot more personal soul-searching than simply undergoing a 2-day detoxification period. Most addiction experts will agree that detoxification is just the beginning. I am weary of anyone who is trying to sell a quick fix for any illness, especially when that illness is such a complex issue, like addiction.

After scrolling though five pages on Google, I was inundated with personal stories about the rapid detoxification process. Unlike the testimonies on the rapid detox providers’ websites, these stories were speckled with pain and frustration. Overwhelmingly, these patients described the process as painful and tough. Not one account described their experience with rapid opiate detoxification to be the painless process that these clinics advertise. One patient said that when he awoke from the procedure, he felt the worst withdrawal he had ever experienced. Another patient described waking up from the procedure, vomiting all over. Even another patient described an awful bought of diarrhea, where he actually messed his bed up every hour or so. He describes a sense of utter embarrassment to have a nurse changing his diarrhea stained sheets every hour. Contrary to what these rapid opiate detoxification providers promote, this procedure is not an entirely painless and dignified process.

So, what does one need to know about rapid opiate detoxification before considering undergoing this process? Look past the vast majority of raving product promotions, and consider some of the lesser-known facts about this procedure.



6 Things You Should Know About Rapid Opiate Detoxification

1) Detoxification is only the beginning. Most addiction experts will agree that detoxification is only the beginning of the process of recovery. Although traditional abstinence based recovery is not the only method we have for treating addiction today, it is still the leading method. A traditional treatment center provides much more to the addicted than simply getting them off drugs physically. The treatment process involves counseling, education about addiction and recovery, and often even includes numerous 12-step meetings. During treatment, addicts will learn about the disease of addiction, while being armed with the tools they need to fight this battle.

Furthermore, many treatment centers recommend a longer stay for opiate addicts. A 30-day stay in a treatment facility will often not be enough time for these addicts to gain the tools they need to stay clean. Often times, these clients will just be starting to feel good enough to engage in activities when their time has ended. Possibly, a rapid detoxification before a 30-day inpatient stay at a treatment facility could help these addicts on a short stay. Most addiction professionals will advise opiate addicts to remain in treatment for at least 90 days, and often a year is the recommended length of stay.

2) Dependence vs. Addiction. Dependence and addiction may seem like the same thing to some, but they are actually very different. Dependence is characterized by the user’s physical dependence on the drug. The dependent individual will experience withdrawal symptoms when they are deprived of their drug of choice, or drug of dependence. Addiction, however, is characterized with negative consequences. A person crosses over from dependence to addiction when the drug use is causing negative consequences in his or her life. The addicted will keep using despite these negative consequences.

Addiction is a complex disease that is compounded with a variety of factors. Addiction is different for everyone who experiences it, as factors such as environment, genetics, and mental health can play big roles in the addiction process. To maintain long-term sobriety, addiction professionals agree that some form of psychotherapy gives the best defense against relapse. Addicts must figure out the reasons they use, in order to combat the use. Often times, addicts have other underlying issues that need to be dealt with. These issues can be medical, personal, or spiritual issues. By dealing with the mind, body, and soul, and addict stand a better chance of long-term sobriety. Rapid opiate detoxification only deals with the physical aspect of addiction, thus leaving the addict vulnerable to relapse.

A number of the publications I read about rapid opiate detoxification mentioned that this was a treatment for opiate dependence, but made no mention of opiate addiction. To be fair, rapid opiate detoxification would be a great way to deal with dependence, but not addiction. The dependent person will not experience cravings, and does not feel the desire to go back to using. The dependent person is generally thought to be able to go right back to their life once detoxified, with little or no extra support needed.

But, this treatment is not aimed at just the dependent person. These rapid opiate detoxification providers claim that this process can nearly cure one’s addiction, while making very little mention of aftercare, or other treatment elements, such as therapy. Most of these websites do mention that they “strongly encourage” patients to seek out some kind of therapy, but this therapy is rarely provided by the rapid detox clinic. I did find one rapid opiate detoxification center that offered a short stay at their “sober house,” following the procedure. Of course, the longer the stay, the more the price goes up. Additionally, this “aftercare” is only available for 4 weeks following the rapid opiate detoxification procedure, and a number of addiction professionals would argue that this is just not enough time for an opiate addict to gain all the tools needed for long-term sobriety.

3) Post Acute Withdrawal Syndrome, PAWS. Opiate addiction alters the brain’s chemistry dramatically, and it may take quite some time for the addict’s brain to return to its normal functioning. When opiates are used for a significant period of time, the brain stops making its own natural opiates. Opiates control our motivation, our feeling of well-being, and our tolerance to pain. When the drugs are taken out of the equation, the user will experience an intense withdrawal that lasts about a week. Although rapid opiate detoxification aims to lessen that withdrawal, in both time and severity, it does not manage anything beyond the mere withdrawal.

It can take an addict’s brain much longer than a few hours, or even a few days to return to normal. For some, the process could take weeks or months, while others may even find they are stuck with PAWS for a year or more. It is during this time period that I always ended up relapsing. The addict will feel totally devoid of his energy, as if he is merely dragging his feet along the ground to even walk. The addict will have little to no motivation, and experience a heightened sensitivity to pain. Basically, the opiate addict may feel like complete crap for months following detoxification.

Rapid opiate detoxification makes no mention of Post Acute Withdrawal Syndrome, and it does not attempt to manage these symptoms. While flooding the brain with naltrexone during the detoxification process will help to eliminate the opiates from your system, it does nothing to help the addict’s brain to replenish these natural opiates. Even with rapid opiate detoxification, the symptoms of PAWS will persist, and the addict is left incredibly vulnerable during this crucial period of recovery.

Rapid opiate detoxification clinics do provide their patients with naltrexone to take in the weeks and months following their procedure. While this does not help to eliminate the symptoms of PAWS, it can eliminate cravings and many argue that this ensures that the addict will not use other opiate in this crucial time. Naltrexone works to block the effects of opiates on the brain.

This actually poses a dangerous position for the addict to be in, without the proper therapy and education needed to remain drug free. The naltrexone is given in two forms, pills and a sub dermal patch. A number of the rapid opiate detoxification clinics prefer to use the patch, as it seems to keep these patients on their naltrexone regimen. With the pills, an addict can easily decide to skip his daily naltrexone dose in order to use. This alone poses a serious risk, as the naloxone will make the opiate addict much more sensitive to opiates than before the rapid opiate detoxification procedure. Too often, addicts will use what would have been considered a small amount of opiates before the procedure, but with the naloxone treatment, this “small amount” can cause an overdose. Furthermore, some patients have reported trying to actually cut these patches out of their skin, so they can use again. Others just use right along with the patch. This, too, is dangerous. The naltrexone blocks the effects of the opiates, but it does not stop them from working. An addict who attempts to use while on naltrexone can easily consume lethal doses, without feeling high before they overdose. Simply using naltrexone after the rapid opiate detoxification procedure does not help to prevent PAWS, and could be more dangerous than not using it.

4) A large number of opiate addicts are not good candidates for rapid opiate detoxification. There are several contradictions to rapid opiate detoxification, in which these people will not be allowed to participate. Rapid opiate detoxification is incredibly rough on the body. Just imagine compacting all the pain for a weeklong kick into a matter of hours. The pain is not lessened, and instead is intensified, over a shorter period of time. It is so painful that the patient is put to sleep, but your body still goes through an incredibly traumatic event.

Some health conditions make it impossible to withstand rapid opiate detoxification without serious complications. If the candidate is pregnant, she will have to wait until after having the baby to consider this treatment. Although, I must admit that I called a number of these rapid detox clinics, asking questions about these health issues, and one clinic even said they would perform the procedure on a pregnant woman. The others stated, “Definitely not.” Patients who have had heart problems are also not candidates for the procedure, as the procedure is likely to cause hypertension and irregular heart rhythms. To complicate this matter further, some intravenous addicts have significant damage to their heart that they may not even know about. Renal issues and liver issues can also exclude someone from this procedure. Finally, a patient with a history of mental illness is not eligible for rapid opiate detoxification. With the number of dual diagnosis patients admitted to treatment, I think this would rule out a significant portion of the opiate addicted population. To make this criteria even more difficult, a number of opiate addicts are simply self-medicating and do not even realize they have these underlying mental issues. Some addicts discover their mental illness while in treatment, which could cause some issues with rapid opiate detoxification. Furthermore, a number of addicts are in poor health due to their addiction and they may not even be aware of some of these problems. Unreported or unknown medical issues can cause some serious complications with rapid opiate detoxification, some of which have led to death.

There are a number of other factors that will not exclude the patient from rapid opiate detoxification, but these issues make these patients “unsuitable” candidates. Some of these clinics will still take these patients, depending on the situation, but it just seems risky to me, especially considering that these issues are ones that are often shared among the addict population. Additionally, rapid opiate detoxification is done intravenously, and some opiate addicts hardly have any good veins left, especially not solid enough to be pumping in a massive amount of drugs while the ill-veined patient undergoes a withdrawal experience that is traumatic and difficult on the body.

Chronic pain patients are generally not good candidates for rapid opiate detoxification. These patients often need these opiates to function, so kicking them out of their system could cause more pain. Chronic pain patients are generally advised to attend treatment centers that specialize in these patients. Dealing with addiction and chronic pain becomes a balance of managing their medications. Patients with dependence on alcohol, benzodiazepines, or stimulants are also not recommended for rapid opiate detox. These substances not only create medical complications, but these patients obviously need more intense treatment. More importantly, to rule out any addicts who are poly-substance users makes the qualified candidate pool rather small. Patients with a history of depression are also not suitable candidates. From my experience, there are a large number of opiate addicts who have some history with depression. Finally, those clients who have unstable social circumstances are not advised to use rapid opiate detoxification before they have stabilized their home life. An unstable social circumstance? Isn’t that where all of our lives end up when we are immersed in active addiction?

5) Poses more serious dangers compared to any other detoxification method. There have been more deaths associated with rapid opiate detoxification than any other method of detoxification. Heavy anesthesia alone can cause problems, even death, not to mention the toll that the procedure takes on the addict’s body. One thing that these rapid detoxification providers fail to mention before the procedure is that diarrhea is a very common side effect. Some patients claim to have messed up their bed every hour from this uncontrollable diarrhea. A gastric ulcer, caused from extreme stress, can result from this procedure. Psychiatric complications are not uncommon, and reactions to the variety of drugs pumped intravenously are just as common. Cardiovascular complications have taken more than one life following this procedure. Rapid opiate detoxification can cause high blood pressure and irregular heartbeat. Many candidates may not realize they have heart issues, until they are exacerbated by the procedure. Finally, rapid opiate detoxification can also cause kidney failure and sepsis, both of which can be fatal conditions.

The most common reasons for patient death following rapid opiate detoxification are pulmonary edema, brain hemorrhaging from extremely elevated blood pressure, and choking on their own vomit. The procedure does make the patient vomit, as it is often a symptom of withdrawal. Rapid opiate detoxification is done while you are “asleep” under sedation, making the chance of aspiration very high.

6) Very expensive. This procedure is not covered by health insurance, mostly because it is not a proven therapy. Health insurance companies are leery of the controversial rapid opiate detoxification, stating it is not usually covered because it is not proven to be safe. Prices may range anywhere from $4,000 to $40,000, depending on the services rendered. The most expensive rapid opiate detoxification prices reflect a 4-week stay at an adjoined sober-living facility. Furthermore, a number of patients who opted for the cheaper treatments claim that the rapid detox clinic added a number of charges during the procedure, such as doctor checks at a nurse’s request. To make financial matters even more strenuous, higher risk patients are generally charged more. The cost of methadone is close to the lowest price of rapid opiate detox, for the entire year! The cost of a 90-day treatment center can even be cheaper than a two-week stay at one of the top rapid detoxification clinics! And both of these methods have more proven success.

On another note, I called a number of these rapid detoxification clinics, pretending to be a patient with some of these health risks, to see what the response was. Most of the people I spoke with dismissed health problems like extremely high blood pressure, or even history of a stroke, claiming that they could still work with these risky issues…just for a much higher fee.

Personally, I do not like to put my life in the hands of one who is out for financial gain, first and foremost. When it comes to healthcare, the patient should come first. The patient’s well-being should come before the dollar. I feel like a rapid opiate detoxification clinic that would take these high-risk patients, weighing profit before potential death, simply do not have the patient’s best interest at hand. Secondly, any clinic that offers the “magic pill,” or “miracle cure” is most likely offering up a pipedream. Recovery from addiction begins with detox, and for these rapid detoxification clinics to only suggest counseling or other aspects of treatment, without providing many viable resources for it, is by no means putting their patient’s well being first.

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2012 6:17 pm 
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Hey Amber .... RAPID DETOX can be GREAT !
I've been thru rapid detox ... it is painful of course ... nobody going in thinks it won't be !!!!
The prolonged sickness and hassle of tapering sub is much worse in my humble opinion. If you have the money ... check it out.
That being said ...
I TOTALLY agree that rapid detox procedure is NOT more affective at long term recovery and do believe that relapse is likely for those short cutting. I get both sides ... but please ... Naltrexone is a totally under utilized option and sub is a way over utilized one.
Great topic ...


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2012 1:33 pm 
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macboy wrote:
Hey Amber .... RAPID DETOX can be GREAT !
I've been thru rapid detox ... it is painful of course ... nobody going in thinks it won't be !!!!
The prolonged sickness and hassle of tapering sub is much worse in my humble opinion. If you have the money ... check it out.
That being said ...
I TOTALLY agree that rapid detox procedure is NOT more affective at long term recovery and do believe that relapse is likely for those short cutting. I get both sides ... but please ... Naltrexone is a totally under utilized option and sub is a way over utilized one.
Great topic ...


Before I ask you a question, I will give you a brief history from where I stand. I am an 2 tour Iraq war veteran. I got blown up a few times, none the less, I began using Hydrocodone to treat pain from injuries. After being on Hydrocodone for a year, I was taking way too much, around 5 pills of 10mg at once just to get the pain to go away. After physical therapy I switched to Suboxone 2mg. I took that for about a year up until last Friday. I decided I had enough of all the addictions in my life. I dug through my bag of meds the VA shoveled in my pockets and found Naltrexone. I read it helped recovering from opiate addiciton. Boy was that a load of BS! I popped one on friday and 4 hrs. later I was in the ER with PAWS. I had never felt so much pain in my life!!! I wanted to die, literally. With the help of my family, I made it through. It is now Monday morning and I am up and cleaning the house. I started doing push-ups and fighting through the anvil on top of my body. Every time I eat I get stomach pain and diarreah. Not FUN!! I cannot sleep for more than 2 hrs. at a time, then I wake up with muscle aches. So the doc said 48 to 72 hrs. to recover from the severe WD. It's been over 72hrs. now.. will this get any better? How do I get my stomach back on track? That seems to be the worst part. I have heard from other friends that have recovered completely that you must trick your body into its' normal self again. Is this true? I have to begin my 2nd semester 3rd year of college on Wednesday. I am in the nuclear technology program so time is not something I have. I want to fight through this. Honestly, I have learned from the military that pain should motivate, not hinder. Will running help speed up the recovery? The weakness I have found is more of in the mind, once I began doing push-ups, I realized I can still knock out 30 or 40. For everyone crying about this same problem, I have found piece with GOD! It helps. Crying gets you no where.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2012 2:16 pm 
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Hey 1st Cav .... if you read my post and dropped some Naltrexone from 2 mg of sub .... I'm really sorry ... it it an opiate blocker (to put it simply) and will cause precipitated WD if you have opiates attached to mu receptors .... yikes ...guess you found that out tho ... not good.
Naltrexone is a type of drug therapy that is very effective at reducing alcohol and opiate cravings as it blocks mu receptor uptake of such AFTER you are clean. Go to the Colemen Institute website for info. I think they are a really good rapid detox center and advocate or naltrexone therapy. That being said ... you have a lot of homework to do. You are not gonna feel good by next wednesday after a year of sub therapy cold turkey. Period. You need to see a Dr and get some professional advice. I am not a Dr and my advice like many on this site can be misunderstood and result in your being sicker. The VA has the advisors for sure. If you have a script for Naltrexone ... I assume it was for drinking ? My only other advice is to be easy on yourself ... you don't need to be off sub so fast .... taper ... feel good ... go to school and do well ... don't try and be all you can be in a week !
GOD BLESS YOU ... Thank you for your service !


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2013 3:08 pm 
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I just wanna add since I was the Success you mentioned at the top. Rapid detox is no magic bullet. But I wanted off sub so bad I was just too weak when it came to the hard core wd's. At least rapid detox did that for me, but I had to do the rest, and other than my wife and God, I pretty much did it myself. No counseling, no meetings (although I went twice to a church recovery group), no therapy, etc. As I read this I think about it it seemed I was more dependent than addicted, reading amber's post. My main reason for going to rapid detox was simply I hated going to a doctor every month and the fear of the impending doom of wd lingering over my head. But as the good dr junig stated success is measured in years not months. So I'm 6 months clean and Gods will so long I as remember to post and still draw breath I will continue updating my success or failure. Gods will no failure.

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My son did rapid detox at the coleman institute, and right after the detox he had the naltroxene pellet surgically implanted. The procedure cost me 1100.00, the detox and the implant.

He had to have 3 days off opiates, the dr gave him valium for those 3 days, and the detox took about 6 hours if I remember right, yes he got sick, yes it was not fun and at the end of the day he got that implant inserted into him.

He didnt have any more withdrawals that I saw... he seemed fine. He stayed sober for almost a year after that, the pellet only lasted 3 months I believe.

The doctor did suggest he go inpatient and do work for his recovery but my son was not ready to do that. Nothing is a magic pill, at the end of the day you really have to want to be sober.

I was with my son the whole time during rapid detox and I went into the room with him when they implanted the pellet....
like I said it just depends on if the person wants to be sober

I didnt think 1100 dollars was unreasonable at all.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2013 5:40 pm 
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When I was tapering off subs I thougt about rapid detox, however the dr told me it would be a bit different to do it to get off subs so I bit the bullet and did it myself.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 14, 2013 12:40 am 
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There is a significant misunderstanding out there-- people think that 'rapid detox' actually removes opioids from the body, or perhaps lifts them from receptors so that they can be metabolized...

but in reality, the naltrexone competes for binding at the opioid receptor, and the fraction of time bound to agonists decreases. The amount of chemicals in your bloodstream stays the same; increases if you count the naltrexone.

More importantly, tolerance occurs at the receptor level. adding naltrexone quickly starts the process of resetting tolerance. but the process still takes about 6-8 weeks to be complete. I've had a number of patients try rapid detox over the years, including some from Suboxone and others from oxycodone or heroin. None were close to their baseline at 48 hours; most complained of lingering withdrawal symptoms that last weeks to months-- which is consistent with the science. Rapid detox as been studied a number of times, with efforts to truly evaluate how people feel and do. The studies clearly show that rapid detox provides very little 'relief' form misery; maybe reducing the length of total withdrawal from 8 weeks to 6 weeks.

BUT.... the long term is the issue. I've known people who dug implants out of their bellies, in order to get the high they still craved. I figure some people most do OK with it.... but I haven't met those people yet, unless I believe the people on their web site.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 23, 2013 10:59 pm 
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I rapid detoxes off methadone, total waste of money I was soo soo sick and they took my money and offered no after care support. They told me I could go back to work two days later and six weeks later I was still very very sick.

I did stay clean for about six months so I guess it could work but you would need to go straight into a detox facility as its full on withdrawal.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 07, 2013 9:23 am 
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I has a resoundingly positive experience with Rapid Opiate Detox (ROD). It is 100x easier than straight Sub withdrawal. I would say that, for me, immediately after the ROD, I was 8 at least 0% though the physical detox process. The week following the procedure was definitely touch-and-go, but I felt markedly better with each successive day. With Sub detox I felt progressively worse for 7 days before I began to feel better. I have come off heroin dozens of times, Sub twice, and methadone once. With that said, I would definitely recommend ROD if you have the money. Mine cost $12K, and insurance will not cover ROD. Keep in mind that this process will only get you off opiates - it does not KEEP you clean by any means. I would only recommend it for Suboxone or methadone detox. As far as ROD being "dangerous," it is no more dangerous than any other surgical procedure or the abuse we put ourselves though on a daily basis maintaining a dope habit.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 9:12 am 
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I'm just not a believer in rapid detox.You check in and walk out a free person.I'm sure you walk out either drugged or in withdrawl.
If anyone could find a way not to go through withdrawl,well it just doesn't happen.It would have to be supernatural.
Ibogaine I find interesting but it's not done in US.It's another form of rapid detox but it involves using drugs to get body back to normal.
Not using seems to be the most common cure.
Opiates are really only made for surgery,short term relief from pain or when your dying.I used long term thinking it wouldn't happen to me but it did.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 15, 2014 11:47 am 
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If there's any advice I can give to anyone considering this method is to not take suboxone longer than needed. It is very easy to become addicted, and never want to come off the drug. And yes, the withdrawals in my opinion are worse than straight opiate withdrawal, and lasts much longer.

If the doctor's intentions really are to get you clean, I think you should be done with treatment in about a month. Unfortunately, I'm going on year 3 taking suboxone at high doses, so now I'm working with my doctor on a very slow taper.

I just urge people to be cautious of some doctors, as they can care more about your money than your recovery. I'd like to blame this on my doctor, but I know in reality it was my decision and fear of relapse that I never got off the drug. I would lie to the doctor so my levels wouldn't be reduced. Can you believe I was prescribed 3 8mg strips daily for 3 years? One would think the doctor should get in trouble for this.

Good luck, those considering a rapid detox, and stick to it!

RT


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PostPosted: Fri May 02, 2014 3:19 pm 
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Thanks for your great work, understanding and ideas/opinions. :)

I didn't do a rapid detox, but went from 24mgs of Subox to zed in 40 days. Thats my version of rapid detox, and after that i think it's the 10th level of Dantes Inferno. :twisted:

Subox, for me, was 100xs worse than cold turkey. If I had known the cost, financial (out 5K for that), emotional, physical, relationships, self image, I WOULD NEVER HAVE TAKEN SUBOX. What were in my docs heads? $$$$$$$$ Why did they refuse to titrate me off MS Contin? I'd had success with that in the past. Even had my nephew do it after the VA gave up on his bomb damaged foot and amputated it. He had success with that.

So what is my point? As has been stated here, IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE IT IS !!! :? And it was.

After 2 days cold turkey they did induction (for $995 +++) and I had hard detox for a week just to get to 24mgs. Then down 2-4 mgs every 4-5 days. Then off at 1mg and hard, hard, THE WORST DETOX I'VE EVER HAD OR HEARD OF, and i go to lots of meetings. I lost 40lbs in 40 days, and i was below normal weight for my height. 2-3 trips to the ER for hypotension, dehydration, and electrolyte imbalance.

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PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2014 12:39 am 
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1stCavVeteran wrote:
I decided I had enough of all the addictions in my life. I dug through my bag of meds the VA shoveled in my pockets and found Naltrexone. I read it helped recovering from opiate addiciton. Boy was that a load of BS! I popped one on friday and 4 hrs. later I was in the ER with PAWS..


Sounds much worse than PAWS.

When I got off heroin years ago, I refused Naltrexone. When I read it blocked opiates, I read it as naturally produced neurochemicals that attach to the opiate receptors, as well those introduced into the system. Why the hell would I want to do that? Well the point was, that one couldn't get high with it in their system, so addicts wouldn't waste their time and money trying to get high, but I figured it was a recipe for possible dysphoria if even normal, self-produced opiate-like neurochemicals couldn't phone home, after some recovery time.


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PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2014 12:56 pm 
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Rapidtaper said

"I would lie to the doctor so my levels wouldn't be reduced. Can you believe I was prescribed 3 8mg strips daily for 3 years? One would think the doctor should get in trouble for this."


????????????????????????????????


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2014 8:07 am 
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Great post, thanks for the info & views.

I looked at one of these rapid detoxes when I was still on heroin several years ago. I don't think it would have worked for me long-term. I'm a "real addict" according to the AA big book definition -- way past depency -- which means that i cannot control my addiction simply through will power, but need something solid & long-term to stay clean ( I use 12 step, which I consider to be a spirital program of recovery for totally non-spiritual people like me).

I've heard about Ibogaine, which is a naturally occurring, powerful hallucinogenic. Taking Ibogaine is said to bring about the same sort of 'psychic change' that 12 step helps us to achieve. It sounds interesting, but I've never heard any actual stories about people getting drug-free using Ibogaine.

-- Glenn

Edit; I should add that I'm a long-term opiate user, close to 7 years in of IV heroin (and cocaine) addiction plus several years of methadone maintenance. My comments are meant more for hard core recovering addicts such as myself, rather than for someone dealing with a shorter term opiate dependency.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 9:23 pm 
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rapidtaperer wrote:
I would lie to the doctor so my levels wouldn't be reduced. Can you believe I was prescribed 3 8mg strips daily for 3 years? One would think the doctor should get in trouble for this.


RT


omg 24mg a day for 3 years.... thats intense. Someone i used to run with when i was scoring h and oxy back in the day is similar to this. He takes 16-24mg of suboxone daily along with several xanax. The guy thinks he is in good shape because he isn't mainlining Heroin anymore, but the truth is he seems sicker then when we did H together.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 14, 2014 4:48 pm 
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I did UROD about 2 months ago now and it worked great. I felt maybe 1-2% WD and was able to get back to work in two weeks. I probably could have went back in one, but wanted to play it safe. Just do your research on the place you go. rapid drug detox in Michigian is where I went and they were great. I still feel a bit shitty, sore legs and creepy feeling skin, but that's it. Man does music and sex feel great!!!!!!!!!! Message if you want more details. My detox cost $8K....


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PostPosted: Thu May 14, 2015 2:24 am 
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I had the Weissman Method rapid detox done a few years back for my addiction to prescription opiates. In my opinion it was not worth the 15 thousand dollars. It may have knocked off a couple days of the detox, but it was not even close to eliminating a majority of it. Still had bad symptoms, and days of insomnia. He gave me a shot of Vitamin B, and gave me some meds to help with the sleep, but it didn't do much.

If I had to do it all over again, I probably would consider Ibogaine, as its much cheaper, and I've seen far more testimonies from people saying that it made detox far easier, like the Weissman method advertised.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 09, 2015 11:18 am 
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I've had a pretty good experience with naltrexone. I went from using heroin non-stop for 5 or 6 weeks, then transitioning to 4mg of Sub per day for 2 weeks, followed by a naltrexone implant procedure 48 hours after my last dose of Suboxone. The transition was ROUGH. I had a good 48 hours of nasty withdrawals. Had to change my pants twice, once while I was at work (yes I worked through the whole thing). It had that horrible edgy cataclysmic impending doom feeling I associate with precipitated withdrawal. But within 4-5 days I was feeling pretty much right as rain, and I had 3 or 4 months opioid free with no incident while the implant lasted.

It's an uncanny feeling knowing you want to use, but you simply cannot. And it was a really beneficial experience because at that stage I had never really felt I could withstand opioid cravings of the intensity I experience in very early recovery without using, or without being in a rehab environment. It made me realise it can be done. And the cravings did subside.

However something strange happened around the 3-4 month mark. I started to notice cravings edge their way back into my life, and I decided to see if heroin would work. I didn't expect it would as the implant was sold to me as a 6 month implant. Ironically I was at an NA meeting when this was all going down, so I left the meeting and went and scored a small amount and it had an effect. So I used non-stop for a few weeks and now I'm back on Suboxone.

Despite that I wouldn't hesitate to try naltrexone again. It affords a lot more freedom than being dependent on Suboxone. And now I know what to expect when the implant wears off I feel I'll be in a better position to deal with it.

Nil side-effects from the naltrexone. Other than it preventing me from using, it was like I was on nothing at all.


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