It is currently Mon Aug 21, 2017 3:04 am



All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Our Sponsors





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: tolerance question
PostPosted: Fri Nov 26, 2010 9:28 pm 
Offline
Average Poster
Average Poster

Joined: Wed Nov 24, 2010 1:31 am
Posts: 7
Hey group:

I've a question re suboxone induced opiate tolerance. I'm assuming that this greater tolerance will dissipate in the usual fashion once one gets off the sub. entirely. Is there any reason to believe that one's brain chemistry will be permanently altered by sub. use in the direction of increased opiod tolerance?

Maybe this is a naive question, but doesn't heavy long term narcotics use alter brain chemistry, such that even after long periods of abstinence, one will build a tolerance to opiates more quickly the next time around? Does anyone know if suboxone makes that situation even worse?

Many thanks,
P.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 26, 2010 9:38 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 12:55 pm
Posts: 4933
Location: Leesburg, FL
Suboxone does increase our tolerance, no doubt about that. But, no it won't do any permanent damage that I know of. After going off of it, our tolerance will go back down. I don't know about whether or not we then build up a new tolerance faster than previously. Hopefully others with more knowledge than I will come along and answer that question.

Part of suboxone use building a higher tolerance also has a lot to do with the dose the person is taking and how long they have been taking sub. Certainly a person who takes 4 mg for a month will lose that tolerance more quickly than someone like me who's been on it for 2 years and takes between 16-24 mg. At least that's how I think it works.

I'm not sure if this answers your questions or not, hopefully it helps.

_________________
-As I have grown older, I've learned that pleasing everyone is impossible, but pissing everyone off is a piece of cake.

-I'm only responsible for what I say, not for what you understand.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: tolerance does change
PostPosted: Fri Nov 26, 2010 9:59 pm 
Offline
Super-Duper Poster
Super-Duper Poster

Joined: Thu Nov 25, 2010 6:39 pm
Posts: 311
Hi,
I do know that opiate addiction is so very complicated and everyone is different. We can decrease our tolerance once off our doc (opiate) and it does depend on length of time of use, dose etc.
However, we will quickly up our tolerance the next time we pick up. We can be back to using the same or more of that doc in no time. It will not take the same amount of time as the first time.
I have experience with this abusing fentanyl, going off it, going back on it my tolerance was very high. Same with vic. I was off for five years clean and sober from everything and then when I relapsed I was initially worried so I only took 5mg. Didn't feel anything. Took another one. And quickly was back taking 20 norco's a day in a month's time.
I can't tell you specifically how this pathophysiology works but I'd like to read up on it. It is a good question.
Hope that helps.

Chinagirl


Top
 Profile  
 
Our Sponsors
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 26, 2010 11:20 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2010 10:39 am
Posts: 4028
Location: Sitting at my computer
Poe,

When I quit taking sub I panicked before 24 hours were even up and took 2 Lorcet Plus (7.5mg Hydrocodone and a bunch of tylenol) and those pills were 3 years old and I felt them kick in between the 38 minute and 42 minute mark. The warm blanket feeling. A peaceful sense of well-being. You know the feeling. Thank God I only had a few Lorcet.

You have to remember that sub works significantly different than a full agonist. It's like sub delivers about 12 volts to the receptors, but hangs on to them like crazy while full agonists blast the receptors with 10,000 volts, but will release from the receptor a lot sooner!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 27, 2010 2:37 am 
Offline
Super Poster
Super Poster
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2010 11:47 am
Posts: 130
what was said above is def true. we do gain our tolerance back much more quickly. If you were to go back to pain pills after a year of not using subs, you might feel real good on a low dose for a couple days but as a couple weeks or month would take a normal person to build tolerance, our tolerance would build within days. i remember learning in detox that if you are going into surgery and have had drug abuse problems with downers it is important to tell the dr as you can wake up in the middle of surgery because your body has more of an immunity to downers then other peoples and they may have to give a higher dose.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 27, 2010 9:36 am 
Offline
Average Poster
Average Poster

Joined: Wed Nov 24, 2010 1:31 am
Posts: 7
Pretty depressing really. 5 years is a long time. But I know first hand that just about anything mind altering, with perhaps the exception of psychedelics including pot, make lasting changes with respect to tolerance. Booze absolutely. Benzos. Whatever.

It seems to me the number one problem for drug takers is tolerance building. If the scientists could find a way around that, it really would alleviate so much misery.

No 2 problem as I see it is the laws against. If drugs were regulated, pure, and reasonably cheap and availiable, the world would be a much saner, much better place for everyone, not just addicts. The "war on drugs" is utter lunacy. One only needs to look at the horrific violence in Mexico. Does anyone really think all that bloodshed makes any sense.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 27, 2010 12:26 pm 
Offline
Super Poster
Super Poster

Joined: Mon Sep 20, 2010 10:09 am
Posts: 104
From what I've read, it's not the tolerance that is the problem, it's the fact that some people fry their opiate receptors by keeping them saturated all the time, so they never get a break from working, so they never grow back once clean, or at least not as many as before opiate addiction. So the less opiate receptors, the quicker they fill up, hence the fast build-up of a tolerance of opiates again. When it comes to any opiate addiction, it all depends on the INDIVIDUAL and how they take care of his/her bodies once clean. Unfortunately there aren't any "one size fits all" answers.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Our Sponsors
Suboxone Forum latest topics RSS feed Subscribe to the entire forum
 

 

 
Fond Du Lac Psychiatry
Dr. Jeffrey Junig, M.D., Ph.D.

  • Board Certified Psychiatrist
  • Asst Clinical Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group