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 Post subject: Tolerance Increase
PostPosted: Fri Jun 05, 2009 11:09 pm 
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When I first started taking suboxone a year and a half ago I leveled off on it at 4mgs a day for a little over six months. Within a year and a half I went up to 12mgs a day. This kind of alarming to me so last January I tapered down to two mgs a day and when I finished my script I stopped taking it altogether. My issue at the time was money. Jesus Christ you want to talk about hell. I was off it for three weeks missing work when finally I just decided that I had had enough with withdrawing, so I got back in the saddle again. I am at a point now where I am not sure what I should do. I am concerned about long term health effects, and about my growing dosage. At the same time since taking suboxone I have cut alcohol out of my life completly and have become a more stable person. I would appreciate any feedback out there especially concerning the long term implications of taking bup and nasty noxone. I was even considering talking to my md about just the subutex. What's up doc?


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 06, 2009 12:30 am 
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Buprenorphine has been around for a long time and is considered a safe drug, but I don't have firsthand knowledge of research into it's long-term effects.

2mgs is too high a dose for many people to jump from. Some can do it, but others find more success with a slower taper to a much lower dose, like from 2mgs to 1mg, then to .5mg then dose every other day, every three days, until you stop.

Why do you want to stop if you're doing well on it and your life is better?

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2009 10:39 am 
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I drank a lot before suboxone, and since I started I haven't really had the desire to drink anymore. I also have NO life what so ever (no girlfriend, no friends, just sleep and work) I agree with Diary of a Quitter: why stop if your life is better?


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2009 12:57 pm 
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jsp4th wrote:
I drank a lot before suboxone, and since I started I haven't really had the desire to drink anymore. I also have NO life what so ever (no girlfriend, no friends, just sleep and work) I agree with Diary of a Quitter: why stop if your life is better?


"no girlfriend, no friends, just sleep and work".....well that definitely explains the picture you've got posted. My heart breaks for you. I am in a similar situation as I am seperated from the world in a way. I am a stay-at-home mom/recovering addict whose nearest family and friends are over 100 miles away. BUT I do have my husband and children (two girls - a 12 y/o and a 4 y/o). Trying to get your shit together and not having anyone to help to share the burden of that with is counterproductive.
So, jsp, lay it on us. We'll be your friends. I'll be your friend. Let us help you to shoulder some of the shit you carry around. (I am not making the assumption that you're miserable. I just bees sayin'.)


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2009 1:04 pm 
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jsp4th, I totally agree with what Finally sick & Tired said. We are here for you.

I know that it's hard to make new friends, figure out what you like to do besides party, build a new life. You don't have to do it all at once though. The only thing you have to do to break your isolation is reach out - and you've already done that here. Please keep sharing - online friends can be lifesavers when you just don't have it in you to go out into the world.

If you can, please try to go to a meeting or a support group, or find a counselor you can talk to. Loneliness is not a good state for us when we are trying to fix our lives and stay off the drugs. We all need support, and it is there if you go looking for it.

Take care,

allie

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2009 2:09 pm 
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I think alot of us go through an isolation stage when we're first getting clean, I know I had a really hard time the first several months. I didn't think I was nearly as fun of a person when I wasn't high and it took awhile for me to establish a new, non using identity and make new friends. I'm naturally a very introverted person so it was pretty difficult but I just had to force myself sometimes. I think I read Dr. Junig write somewhere that if your not comfortable doing something pretend like you are! I think it's good advice and it's helped me. As Diary said the most important thing to do is reach out to others you might even try going to an N.A. meeting or some kind of support group even if you don't agree/believe in 12-step programs you might get a chance to meet other people who aren't using drugs. The big thing for me was to get back into things I did for fun before I started using and find some new interests. The next time someone offers to take you out for a cup of coffee or dinner say yes! or better yet ask someone else out to a cup of coffee. Either way just hang in there man things got alot better for me it just took some time and more importantly some work on my part.

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 Post subject: I agree
PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2009 3:21 pm 
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[font=Trebuchet] [/font] I agree ... sometimes doing the right thing can be lonely.I am pretty isolated right now, but I don't usually mind. I have my daughter and my husband, and I am more than happy with them.

As far as the poster, don't worry about getting off Sub. if you are doing well. Subconsciously it has been pumped into our heads that if we need medication, we are weak. I went through this many times, and every time I suffered, not the people who convinced my psyc meds were bad for me. I consider Suboxone a psyc drug because it works off our brain receptors, and since being on it- life is great!


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Fond Du Lac Psychiatry
Dr. Jeffrey Junig, M.D., Ph.D.

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