It is currently Sat Aug 19, 2017 3:31 am



All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Our Sponsors





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Jan 09, 2011 3:57 pm 
Offline
New Poster
New Poster

Joined: Sun Jan 09, 2011 2:28 pm
Posts: 2
[font=Century Gothic]I have been on suboxone for about 6 months. I am 24 yrs old and this is my first time being on suboxone long term. When I initially found my doctor he estimated I'd be on sub for 6 months, he also prescribed me anti-depressants(which I do not even take) mentioning I would not be on sub forever and that would help me after I was taken off . I have already discussed with him my fears about stopping my dosage. I feel very comfortable talking to him and he agreed to keep me on longer because of my insecurities, but he did not give me a specific time line of when he is planning to ween me. I also have hep C. I am terrified!!! Suboxone is saving my life! and I cannot imagine mine without it. I KNOW I will eventually relapse if Im taken off. I would greatly appreciate anyones suggestions as to how to approach my dr about this subject. I truly feel I need to be on suboxone for life and would like to be well-informed when I confront my dr on the issue. Is it normal to be on sub for life or is it a rarity?? Why is there ever a limit on the time you can be on sub?? Help! [/font]


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 09, 2011 4:29 pm 
Welcome to the forum Janis!!

So glad you joined us!! As for staying on sub indefinitely, well its just a matter of whats best for the patient in my opinion. I personally agree with the fact that some people will require sub indefinitely. I do not understand some of these doctors this day and time, knowing what they do about addiction and forcing patients off of sub or putting a time limit on treatment. It defeats the purpose in my opinion. The Reckitt Benkiser pamphlet says that a patient may stay at a stable maintnance dose until he/she and his/her doctor feels it is time to do a medical taper. If in the process of the medical taper the patient feels at risk of relapse, the patient can restabalize at the dose they were at for however long needed. Maybe not word for word but its pretty dang close to that. I would just be completely honest with your doctor as you've said in your post. Just tell him your fears and concerns. Tell him you know you will relapse if you stop treatment and thats not what you want. Just be completely honest with your doctor and im willing to bet you, things will turn out as you need them too. If not, then you would possibly need to find a new doctor. I remember how i felt at 6 months and it was the same way you feel. However, im in my 20th month now and i've grown so much and made so many changes that i dont feel that i will need it for life. I have no time limit on treatment though. I will taper off when the time is right, and not a second sooner. Changes were still taking place for me as much as a year into treatment. I have made a steady progress from the very beginning. Their are times when i wander how in the world i am still improving my life when its already so great yet it still keeps getting better and better. Its by far, the best and most effective treatment i've ever experienced and i've been to many rehabs and meetings etc. etc. Again, welcome to the forum and i hope this is helpful. Others will come along with their opinions as well.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 09, 2011 8:46 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2010 10:39 am
Posts: 4028
Location: Sitting at my computer
Janis,

You should tell your doctor exactly what you just told us, you're afraid that if you quit sub that you'll relapse. If that isn't enough to get him to stop pressuring you then I would look for a new sub doctor.

I can't believe he would 'estimate' how long you'd be on sub originally....especially only estimating 6 months!

Recovery is uniquely personal and there just isn't some magic timeline that everyone follows. Sure, there are some hallmarks that everyone goes through, but as for indicating when you'll be stopping suboxone....no one knows.

When you're ready, you'll know it and until then I would stay on suboxone if I were you...even if it means finding a new doctor.

Good Luck


Top
 Profile  
 
Our Sponsors
 Post subject: geez
PostPosted: Fri Feb 25, 2011 10:37 pm 
Offline
Power Poster
Power Poster
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2010 12:54 am
Posts: 47
Location: NY NY
Wow, your doctor is a crackpot. Maybe when they take the 8 hour course to be able to apply Sub, they are advised not to prescribe indefinately. Thank G-d my doc seems to err on the side of longer treatment and possibly never taking someone off that is living a better life because of it. The deal they don't seem to understand is that opioid dependency is a DISEASE and that just taking medicine doesn't mean we are cured. Far from it!!

To me, if you've found something that puts you in remission of your opioid dependency, the vast majority are crazy to totally stop. Again, it's like high blood pressure, or AIDS: a course of medical treatment that stops is potentially a disaster. But then again, every person knows what's in their own heart, whether they will use again or not.

For me, I still have significant opioid craving even at 16 mgs of Suboxone. I'm trying to get into a methadone treatment.

James

_________________
"Never tease a weasel/The weasel will not like it/ And teasing isn’t nice!”


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: For Life
PostPosted: Fri Feb 25, 2011 11:54 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2011 12:35 am
Posts: 2801
Location: Southwest
I wouldn't obsess about being on Sub for life right now, just see if you can go month to month without any pressure to taper down. You really don't know for sure at this early point of your recovery just how long you'll need to be on it. But knowing there isn't a timeline would remove the anxiety you are feeling. Ask your doctor that. He may just agree to let you make the decision on when to start tapering down.

Are you in some kind of recovery program like NA, AA, Rational Recovery, etc? Once you have enough time under your belt you may not feel the need to stay on it, but for now, don't worry.

The people who generally stay on it for life are those who took large doses of Heroin or other strong meds for an extended period of time and their brains just don't manufacture the "feel good" endorphins anymore. Not all, but a most of them.

I have thought about it too, but right now I'm just living one day at a time and we'll see how I feel later. At your young age your brain will work just fine repairing the damage. But once again, give it plenty of time.

Let us know how it works out. And congrats on being off the dangerous stuff.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: geez
PostPosted: Sat Feb 26, 2011 5:35 am 
creel1950 wrote:
Wow, your doctor is a crackpot. Maybe when they take the 8 hour course to be able to apply Sub, they are advised not to prescribe indefinately. Thank G-d my doc seems to err on the side of longer treatment and possibly never taking someone off that is living a better life because of it. The deal they don't seem to understand is that opioid dependency is a DISEASE and that just taking medicine doesn't mean we are cured. Far from it!!

To me, if you've found something that puts you in remission of your opioid dependency, the vast majority are crazy to totally stop. Again, it's like high blood pressure, or AIDS: a course of medical treatment that stops is potentially a disaster. But then again, every person knows what's in their own heart, whether they will use again or not.

For me, I still have significant opioid craving even at 16 mgs of Suboxone. I'm trying to get into a methadone treatment.

James


Speak for yourself, saying its a disease is one thing, but comparing it to AIDS is insane! Its your choice to use in the end bro, stop blaming it on every other factor except yourself, some of these people citing the pamphlets lol? I would say long term to get your shit straight absolutely and get a support system in place, but do i believe in indefinite use, hell no a lot of people i know that claim to have zero side effects long term from sub are not exactly too nostalgic of what its like to feel "normal" over the years, thats what happened to me i used to be one of these guys argueing after long term use im "normal" but my normal is all fucked up. I was on long term for about a year and about 30 days clean off sub now still in withdrawal and its pretty miserable imo, thats one thing to keep in mind it binds to your receptors so hard and your literally feeling the drug at all times of the day cause of the long half life so it aint no week long withdrawal like a short acting opiate.


Top
  
 
 Post subject: Re: geez
PostPosted: Sat Feb 26, 2011 9:21 am 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 16, 2010 2:20 pm
Posts: 635
Onniegrapples wrote:
creel1950 wrote:
Wow, your doctor is a crackpot. Maybe when they take the 8 hour course to be able to apply Sub, they are advised not to prescribe indefinately. Thank G-d my doc seems to err on the side of longer treatment and possibly never taking someone off that is living a better life because of it. The deal they don't seem to understand is that opioid dependency is a DISEASE and that just taking medicine doesn't mean we are cured. Far from it!!

To me, if you've found something that puts you in remission of your opioid dependency, the vast majority are crazy to totally stop. Again, it's like high blood pressure, or AIDS: a course of medical treatment that stops is potentially a disaster. But then again, every person knows what's in their own heart, whether they will use again or not.

For me, I still have significant opioid craving even at 16 mgs of Suboxone. I'm trying to get into a methadone treatment.

James


Speak for yourself, saying its a disease is one thing, but comparing it to AIDS is insane!


I beg to differ. Both diseases can result in fatality. Both are incurable. I've heard addiction compared to many other diseases and there is nothing wrong with comparing it to AIDS.

Janis - if you have Hepatitis C, you will find that most gastroenterologists strongly support long-term, indefinite ORT (opiate replacement therapy) for those of use with this chronic illness. I'm twice your age. I've had HepC longer than you've been alive and I am now having some pretty nasty symptoms from it, and probably looking at a liver transplant within the next 5 to 10 years. My disease did not respond to treatment, which is usually Interferon with Riboviron (Marketed as Pegasys and Pegintron). I was told that I should be on maintenance for the rest of my life, and I have accepted it.

You, however, are quite young. You could have a good chance of success with treatment for your disease. Success rates for people under 40 years of age who weigh less than 200lbs are about 35% with Pegasys, but be warned, the treatment is grueling, very much akin to chemo for cancer.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: geez
PostPosted: Sat Feb 26, 2011 9:21 am 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 16, 2010 2:20 pm
Posts: 635
Edit....double post, sorry


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: geez
PostPosted: Sun Feb 27, 2011 5:30 am 
junkie781 wrote:
Onniegrapples wrote:
creel1950 wrote:
Wow, your doctor is a crackpot. Maybe when they take the 8 hour course to be able to apply Sub, they are advised not to prescribe indefinately. Thank G-d my doc seems to err on the side of longer treatment and possibly never taking someone off that is living a better life because of it. The deal they don't seem to understand is that opioid dependency is a DISEASE and that just taking medicine doesn't mean we are cured. Far from it!!

To me, if you've found something that puts you in remission of your opioid dependency, the vast majority are crazy to totally stop. Again, it's like high blood pressure, or AIDS: a course of medical treatment that stops is potentially a disaster. But then again, every person knows what's in their own heart, whether they will use again or not.

For me, I still have significant opioid craving even at 16 mgs of Suboxone. I'm trying to get into a methadone treatment.

James


Speak for yourself, saying its a disease is one thing, but comparing it to AIDS is insane!


I beg to differ. Both diseases can result in fatality. Both are incurable. I've heard addiction compared to many other diseases and there is nothing wrong with comparing it to AIDS.

Janis - if you have Hepatitis C, you will find that most gastroenterologists strongly support long-term, indefinite ORT (opiate replacement therapy) for those of use with this chronic illness. I'm twice your age. I've had HepC longer than you've been alive and I am now having some pretty nasty symptoms from it, and probably looking at a liver transplant within the next 5 to 10 years. My disease did not respond to treatment, which is usually Interferon with Riboviron (Marketed as Pegasys and Pegintron). I was told that I should be on maintenance for the rest of my life, and I have accepted it.

You, however, are quite young. You could have a good chance of success with treatment for your disease. Success rates for people under 40 years of age who weigh less than 200lbs are about 35% with Pegasys, but be warned, the treatment is grueling, very much akin to chemo for cancer.


Nice logic?!?! it can result in fatality and is incurable that is laughable dude, Just cause you havent seem people recover succesfully does not mean certain people dont leave there addiction behind, and a common cold can result in fatality, so can the flu, so can a cold sore on a baby, does that make it comparable to AIDS, NO. You are confusing correlations with distinct properties. With your logic people that are crazy use, so all people that use are crazy, see its a fun game with that run around logic i can argue any rediculous point. Once again addiction is a choice, i chose to take pills, i chose to relapse, i chose to get clean, you can not chose to just not pick up your aids. And it can result in fatality from overdose, not detox, aids results directly in fatality regardless of CHOICE. I know it feels like we didnt choose addiction sometimes, but we did despite what the years of our justification has told us with all due respect.
Like you said yourself you were told indefinite maintenance and you accepted it, keyword accepted it, you werent strapped down into a chair and shot up with dope.


Top
  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Our Sponsors
Suboxone Forum latest topics RSS feed Subscribe to the entire forum
cron
 

 

 
Fond Du Lac Psychiatry
Dr. Jeffrey Junig, M.D., Ph.D.

  • Board Certified Psychiatrist
  • Asst Clinical Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group