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PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2014 11:21 am 
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Hi all. I'm a supervisor at a large jail. We are building a new jail now and I'm wanting to include a suboxone drug replacement therapy program along with aa and na. I have the powers that be convinced of the benefits of a program like this, not just honoring existing prescriptions but partnering with a local suboxone Dr to provide intervention and continuous care after release if such a thing is even possible. My problem is that I can't find any jails that currently have programs like this. Rather than reinvent the wheel, does anyone know of a jail anywhere in the world that offers a program like this? Any advice would be great.
Thanks.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2014 11:34 am 
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First of all, I commend you for your efforts, whether or not they bare fruit. The only thing I have ever heard of as far as treating inmates with opiate detoxes once incarcerated is for those who were already on methadone maintenance, and when they do go to jail, they are immediately put on a 21 day detox. But as far as subs go, never heard of such a thing. I remember being sicker than a dog in jail many, many years ago, and the only thing I was given was librium.

I really hope you can pull something like this off! Do you mean that you want to use suboxone as a short-term method to ease the withdrawals of inmates detoxing off opiates, or for long-term use, even after released?


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2014 11:51 am 
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I'm interested in long term, following release. I'm hoping that I can find a Dr willing to deal with medicare so follow up would be possible. Most inmates with substance abuse issues aren't exactly rolling in cash so the $100 to $200 a month suboxone Dr's appear to change per visit is probably simply beyond them.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2014 12:09 pm 
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Jailguy
Trailblazers come aloug , and you may just be one of them.
I think what you are trying to do is commendable and a good thing. I too have never heard of such a program for inmates but it is loug over due imo.

It ll take convincing of higher ups, but if you can get them on board with your plan it would do many a great service.

Best of luck to you J Guy...


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 20, 2014 8:36 pm 
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Hi jailguy.

I'm so glad to have noticed this thread. It certainly give me hope to know that there are people like you, who are involved in the incarceration side of things, who takes a serious interest in helping addicts, who definitely are over-represented in the prison population! I feel certain it would reduce recidivism amongst addicts.

I'm not sure what you're up against with local powers that be, but it is encouraging that you're even having such a conversation with them.

Why I say "I don't know what you are up against", is because there is something called the "prison-industrial complex" (an obvious spin off from "military-industrial complex"), a term you're likely familiar with if you've kept up on the political side of things, related to your line of work. With the advent of "prison privatization", "CXW", et al (see wallstcheatsheet [dot] com link, provided below), were (and seemingly still are) some of the hottest stocks to be holding when the economy tanked, with large shareholders making a killing in a relatively short amount of time, after the turn of the millennium.

The following essay was written way back in the 90s, and although quite radical, I agree with much of what he says, although I wouldn't want to see legalization across the board, as in, a scenario of crack and heroin sold along side the bottles of liqueur at convenience stores. But decriminalization, and making things like suboxone programs accessible to the poor, including while in prison to give them a good start upon release (counseling, and a medication aid to stop narcotics cravings when released into general population), would be a huge step in the right direction!

Anyway, here is an excerpt from the old essay (along with link to read it in entirety), that was written in the 90s during Clinton admin (first term, if I'm not mistaken), and seems as if it was prescient in many ways (excluding things like his tangent about tobacco, but who knows what the future holds):
Quote:
In many states there is a move to privatization of jails and prisons. Instead of being run by the Government, they will be run by private corporations for profit.

The labor of the prisoner belongs to the State, but when the State transfers their interest to a private corporation, the labor of the prisoner belongs to the corporation. A corporation will run the lives of prisoners, and decide how they shall labor and what they shall labor at. See any chance for profit here?

Under the Thirteenth Amendment to the US Constitution, slavery is not illegal. Slavery is illegal unless it is for conviction for a crime. In that case, slavery is perfectly legal.

The actual text of the Thirteenth Amendment (with some emphasis added) is as follows:


Amendment XIII

Section 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.

Section 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

more @ http://home.earthlink.net/~ynot/slave2.html


Most Americans don't even realize that slavery is still legal. The powers that be 'invent' a crime (could be through lobbying of legislators, and/or behind the scenes scheming of the greedy in high places), or take a relatively minor one already in existence (that for technical purposes, is a victimless crime, like narcotics possession, as opposed to rape, murder, armed robbery, etc., etc.) and blow it out of proportion with "War on Drugs" rhetoric, and the slave labor pool is increased. Shareholders certainly don't want to see a reduction in recidivism, when they can cash in on both tax payer dollars, and prisons that can potentially turn a profit for some fat cats, when the inmates are performing labor at costs that the outside labor pool can't compete with (this is mentioned in the essay, with examples, one being prisoners who were - and maybe still are, at an even greater rate today - making electronic parts for the high tech industry, that put many workers out of a job).

Quote:
Most importantly, with prisoners doing the work, "absenteeism is very low," says William Meehan, president of U.S. Technologies. Slave laborers working for him make electronic parts that go to such companies as IBM and Motorola. Meehan closed a plant in Austin, Texas and laid off the workers so he could hire prisoners.

more again @ http://home.earthlink.net/~ynot/slave2.html










---------------------

Quote:
Over the past several years, one of the best investments has been in shares of prison owners and operators. There are two publicly traded that dominate the industry in the United States – Corrections Corp. of America (NYSE:CXW) and Geo Group (NYSE:GEO).

http://wallstcheatsheet.com/business/2- ... group.html


I'm sorry, in that I realize that's all a tangent, but I get to thinking of the big picture, what you possibly could be up against at some levels, and the pebbles in the pond effect if you succeed. What starts out small could grow, if you are able to put a chink into the armor of the "prison-industrial complex", because of a humanitarian, inside job, with something like what you have in mind. I can just imagine the implications, if a pilot program such as yours, bears a lot of fruit. It would get lots of press once word got out!!


I went on a huge political rant about suboxone being virtually inaccessible to the poor (with few exceptions, that have long waiting lists), on another thread, that you might find of interest: post86281.html




Edit: A couple bad grammars and spelhings. Probably more that went unnoticed on 2nd read.
*


Last edited by no_boop_shoo_be_doop on Tue Jul 22, 2014 11:00 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 22, 2014 10:53 pm 
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Bump (are we allowed to do that here?)

This jail treatment thing seems like an idea that is past due, could be "paradigm shifting" (I hate using that buzzword, but once in awhile it seems to apply).

jailguy, you might not get much in way of responses here from looks of it (other than few you have, including my ranting), but try google research for starts and see what trails it leads you down, if you haven't already. If you get anywhere with the channels you are going through (or any new ones you try), please report back, even if months from now (I am subscribing to this topic to get notice in email of any updates).


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2014 12:35 pm 
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Shout out to Jailguy,
I am not aware of any jails allowing subjects to continue to be on their replacement meds. One jail in a county nearby provided comfort meds during withdrawal but the rest of the month was difficult for her to say the least. Ironic that people in jail have not been convicted of a crime (usually) but subjected to cruel treatment. Seems like something ripe for litigation.
I wish you the best and hope you can pull this off. Often an arrest may be the catalyst to get motivated and start treatment.
pax


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2014 9:37 pm 
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The county jail in Charlotte court house Virginia has allowed inmates to finish their existing prescription of buprenorphine, but won't allow refills or follow up visits to doctor or clinic. I was quite surprised when a girl that I know and actually helped to get in to a suboxone program was permitted to have her bupe after she was arrested for crimes that she'd committed months prior, during her active addiction. The nurse dispensed her daily dose.


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