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PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2012 1:51 pm 
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Have you guys seen these commercials? As soon as I saw it I was like: LOOK! Suboxone Commercial!

Although they NEVER say "Suboxone" or anything during the whole commercial. They just tell you to go to Turntohelp.com. Very discreet. Weird.

Anyway, what do you guys think? I think it's great. Now if RB could just get on the physician education things might improve for addicts.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2012 2:29 pm 
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That is TERRIFIC news. It's about damned time they started advertising on TV. I hope to see them on a channel near me soon. :mrgreen:

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2012 2:36 pm 
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I don't know if this is a good or bad thing. More awareness is always good but at the same time that also could be a bad thing, depending who sees it.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2012 1:22 pm 
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Well, if more awareness will help someone that's always a good thing- but it could drastically change things as well.. One of the knocks on suboxone maintenance is that people feel Dr's are just in for the money.. I have always disagreed with this notion because once you're induced there's really not much money in it for the Dr's.. We all know that if the Dr's did a little advertising they'd be at their 100 patient limit almost immediately (those that aren't already).. As a result of this they're leaving a lot of money on the table when they decide to take long term patients..

The first people that could be effected by any type of suboxone advertising could be the maintenance patients, IMHO.. I'd hate to see long term patients be forced off their treatment because an advertising push created a larger demand than the Dr's could handle with the current regulations of 100 per dr.. I worry that an advertising push, with the current regulations they have, would result in us REALLY seeing Dr's in it for the money because they'd be forced to taper people much too fast


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 12:22 am 
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I live in a very rural county, and I heard an advertisement on the radio today!!!!

I was shocked :shock:

especially since, there are only two doctors in about a 80 mile radius, and this is the local station I heard it on. same thing, they just say "turn to help" website.


I kinda think that if there were more DEMAND, there'd be more doctors though. Anyways, thats my two cents on what the others said above.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 12:34 am 
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Agreed, Amber. I think the more people become interested, then the more doctors will become available, all as treatment become more legitimized. I don't see ANY downside to this at all. This medication SAVES people's lives. Making more people aware of a way to get help medically for a condition is not a bad thing. Education - Knowledge - is POWER and is never a bad thing.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 6:07 am 
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hatmaker510 wrote:
Agreed, Amber. I think the more people become interested, then the more doctors will become available, all as treatment become more legitimized. I don't see ANY downside to this at all. This medication SAVES people's lives. Making more people aware of a way to get help medically for a condition is not a bad thing. Education - Knowledge - is POWER and is never a bad thing.


You took the words right out of my mouth...I was just about to agree with amber and you did it so wonderfully for me! LOL

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 5:21 pm 
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hatmaker510 wrote:
I don't see ANY downside to this at all.


In theory there's no downside- but there never is a downside in theory.. Then once we put these theories into practice all kinds of unintended consequences pop up.. There's not a high demand for suboxone right now because the Dr's don't advertise.. They don't advertise because the 100 patient (30 for an initial period) makes that senseless.. I'll bet if you ask Dr J what his thoughts are on this he'd tell you that all the Dr's have to do is put a sign in the waiting room and they'd be at the limit in a matter of hours.. That's my opinion- as far as I know he's never said anything like that but I'd sure like to know his thoughts on this.. Maybe you could ask him, Hat? Be interesting to hear his take on this.. I know nothing about the medical field but supply & demand is supply & demand and as a business owner for 30+ years I can tell you that's something that's pretty much the same in all industries..

I really don't think it's far fetched to say that an advertising pitch, with the current restrictions in place, could produce a bunch of unintended consequences.. Right off the top of my head I can see good Dr's being forced to at least consider doing away with maintenance customers to try to help the influx of people looking for help.. I can also see Dr's seeing this demand as a cash cow and trying to have as many of those 100 patients in the induction phase as possible- cause that's where the money really is..

I'm all for helping as many people as possible, and I'm just sorta playing devil's advocate from a business perspective.. Without any hard numbers, or Dr's' perspectives I'm just guessing.. It's an interesting subject, from a business perspective, that's for sure.. You guys could be right, I could be way off


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 6:36 pm 
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I hear what you're saying and I definitely think there would at least be a transition period of some kind. But I think eventually what would happen is more doctors would get into the field of prescribing suboxone. As it becomes more well known it will become less stigmatized and more common in medical circles so better doctors will - I hope or theorize - start prescribing suboxone.

But I do think you're right that in the beginning there could be more patients than providers, but one would hope that would be more gradual.

But doctors do advertise on the 4+ suboxone doctor locators. I count that as advertising.

Anyhooo....I'm sure it'll work out somewhere in the grey area in between.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 7:30 pm 
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I saw this too a few times. Plus I saw a huge suboxone billboard on the way back from the florida keys on the highway. That one said suboxone on it tho.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 10:35 pm 
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I wish for every dollar spent advertising Suboxone that 2 dollars would be spent educating doctors who prescribe full agonists. The gross overprescribing of pain pills is the real issue.

I'm all for Suboxone and it being more available, but way too many people are still completely uninformed when it comes to the dangers of narcotic pain meds.

Just my 2 cents.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 10:44 pm 
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Quote:
The gross overprescribing of pain pills is the real issue.


Agreed. The opposite issue exists as well; however. Under treatment of legitimate pain is a real problem in the US medical community, because of the very reason you stated. Both problems actually exist and any doctor or medical person, I'd think, would be in one camp or the other. Or, I'd hope, somewhere in between, actually.

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2012 1:56 pm 
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hatmaker510 wrote:
I hear what you're saying and I definitely think there would at least be a transition period of some kind. But I think eventually what would happen is more doctors would get into the field of prescribing suboxone. As it becomes more well known it will become less stigmatized and more common in medical circles so better doctors will - I hope or theorize - start prescribing suboxone.

But I do think you're right that in the beginning there could be more patients than providers, but one would hope that would be more gradual.

But doctors do advertise on the 4+ suboxone doctor locators. I count that as advertising.

.


Fair points, all around.. Any idea why the 100 patient limit is still in effect? I can understand it for new medication, but I don't think anyone would classify suboxone as a "new medication".. Even in the US it's been prescribed for 20+ years now- and MUCH longer in Europe.. That's definitely not "new" in the cycle of a medication.. I guess the only other reason for this is exactly what you said- the stigma around the medication.. Surely they've had enough time to do any studies on the medication?! Why not just lift the 100 patient limit?!


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2012 3:19 pm 
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This is where lobbyists step in and start opening discussions with congress-persons about introducing legislature to raise that limit. And of course we as individuals start dialog with our rep or senator. I recall I've brought this up before on here about a write-in campaign, but I think it fizzled out.

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2012 6:54 pm 
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It's an interesting campaign. I'm not sure about the laws in the US. Here there's a law that disallows the direct advertising of prescription medicine to the public, because if every patient went to their doctor requesting some medication they saw spruiked on TV, the doc wouldn't be able to make the right choice for the patient. Is it the same in the US? Or did RB decide to make the campaign discreet because of the controversial nature of the illness / treatment?

We get a lot of campaigns for depression / diabetes / blood pressure / impotence down here that are really ambiguous. Kinda like "if you wanna change your life, go to behappynow.com" ... then the audience goes to the website fills in some questionnaire to print and hand to the doctor that says they're depressed / addicted. When the patient says he / she went to X website to get the referral, the doc recognises the campaign after being informed of it by the company's pharma rep, and the doc's meant to feel some kinda indebtedness to the company for bringing the referral, and leans towards their brand of treatment. Clearly it works if companies still do it.

The supply and demand thing is interesting. I was wondering why RB would be doing it if the patient caps remained the same. And increase in demand justifies and increase in cost, so even if there's no new patients or doctors it may still be worth it.


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