It is currently Mon Aug 21, 2017 9:53 pm



All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Our Sponsors





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Apr 17, 2011 1:44 pm 
Offline
Super Poster
Super Poster
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 18, 2010 7:54 pm
Posts: 107
So it’s probably a good thing, but I was wondering if anybody feels the same way as I do. So I really was never a huge drinker in the past. In fact I really wasn’t a huge anything in the past until I was introduced to Percocet and that whole family where I found my true love. I always smoked pot, drank, and did coke just occasionally and it never really got in my way or caused any big trouble for me. It was the opiate family that got me in really trouble to say the least. Man I hate that family LOL

With that being said, I still always liked to drink from time to time. But since the year I have been on suboxone, I don’t even think about drinking the slightest bit. I have actually forced myself to drink a couple times (I know, stupid idea) just to see what it felt like. Well after drinking like 2 beers, I am tired and just want to go home and sleep. In the past I could drink 10 beers with no problem and not be the slightest bit tired. Like I said, I guess it’s a good thing but sometimes I don’t think it is.

Like the other day we went out to the bar for one of my co-workers last day in the company. Everyone was drinking except me. Someone asked me what I wanted from the bar and I replied “root beer please” they looked at me like I was freaking crazy. I didn’t want to drink because I knew I would be extremely tired afterward and also really had no ambition to drink.

IDK, I would like to at least be able to have a drink or two with my friends, but whatever. I was just wondering if anyone else had zero craving for alcohol while on suboxone or if they get really tired after a few drinks. It also starts to make me wonder, could this drug be something that could help battle alcoholism?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 17, 2011 5:20 pm 
Offline
Average Poster
Average Poster

Joined: Thu Apr 07, 2011 4:28 pm
Posts: 15
Hey sub! I have been on suboxone for 3 weeks now. After reading your post it made me notice I haven't had any craving to drink either. I really haven't been a big drinker but I to would drink occasionally from time to time. For me I think it has something to do with knowing not to drink while taking an opiate so I don't even think of that as an option. I read some other posts on the forum about drinking and taking subs. From what I read a couple beers won't hurt anything. As far as you getting tired? It probably is just a side effect from the subs. I have heard of other people drinking and getting tired. The effects are different depending on the person. I hope this helps a little. I can't wait to see what others post, now I'm curious on what they say lol......


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2011 1:50 am 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jun 17, 2009 9:59 pm
Posts: 993
Location: Carson City, Nevada
I really don't know if the Sub affects alcohol cravings. It wouldn't surprise me if it does. I mean, Naloxone is closely related to Naltrexone, which is used to curb alcohol cravings. Of course, we supposedly don't get any Naloxone because we swallow it, but I don't believe that is really true. If someone needs a Naloxone (Narcan) injection and their veins are shot, they put it in their nose to let it go through the membranes. It can cross membranes to a degree, so it's quite possible it curbs alcohol cravings/desire to drink in my opinion.

IDK, if you don't feel like drinking, be happy. It's not good for you and it's not hard to switch addictions. Just a thought.

laddertipper

_________________
First you take a drink, then the drink takes a drink, then the drink takes you. ~F. Scott Fitzgerald


Top
 Profile  
 
Our Sponsors
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2011 10:47 am 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 15, 2010 5:08 am
Posts: 1503
It's an interesting effect. I wouldn't really notice it either way, seeming as I've never had a problem with the drink. However people I know who were both alcoholics & opiate addicts have claimed that they didn't feel like drinking anywhere near as much after starting treatment.

Why is this? The only thing I can speculate as a layperson with too much experience is that alcohol and opioid addictions are quite similar in how they affect the brain, and the areas they work with. Maybe the suboxone, by giving the addiction parts of our brain their "daily fill", also reduces our desire to drink? Alternatively it could be the antagonist properties of buprenorphine acting kinda like a naltrexone? I'd be interested to find out myself.

I still drink from time to time, and can drink lots if I want to. This is mainly cos of social situations. However I could easily go months without.

I highly doubt it would have anything to do with the naloxone component. When we take our subox under the tongue, hardly any naloxone actually gets absorbed, and the tiny bit that does wears off after 15 odd minutes. RB and the medical community claim that none gets absorbed whatsoever, but doctors who have been prescribing it for a while & people like ourselves know that not to be completely true. A tiny bit gets through, which is why Subutex is often used initially when switching people from methadone.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2011 9:32 pm 
Offline
Super Poster
Super Poster
User avatar

Joined: Mon Apr 11, 2011 8:27 pm
Posts: 107
Man... same here!!! I was addicted to alcohol before subs along with opiates. I actually quit drinking with no withdrawals (and Jesus) on sub. Amazing cause i tried to quit before with no success. Now i don't even want to drink. It makes me sick to the stomach when i only had 2 beers. I rarely drink anymore and when i do its only a glass of wine when i have dinner with my wife. I guess sub could be used to cure the first week of alcohol withdrawals for an alcoholic if used correctly. Like i said A WEEK. or less. Don't want to trade one evil for a worse one.

_________________
This world is meaningless, but through Him is everlasting life!!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 19, 2011 11:58 pm 
Offline
Super Poster
Super Poster

Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2010 11:22 pm
Posts: 101
My 2 cents: I was a big drinker before I found opiates. I still enjoyed drinking while on opiates, liked the mixture. Since being on sub, I don't drink much, but when I do, I notice my tolerance seems to be increased. I can drink much more without the same effect My loss of desire to drink could be the sub, or it could be the fact I'm 8 years older than when I started opiates. I've toyed around with the idea of drinking to quit sub, just like I used to drink away the opiate wd's.

On a side note, one of my former druggie friends got through opiate withdrawals with speed. He quit opiates and started smoking crack (do not try this at home!). But it worked for him. Two months of crack every day, then he quit. No opiate wd's and no crack wd's.

To each his own I guess.

Jimmy


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 21, 2011 3:30 pm 
Offline
Average Poster
Average Poster

Joined: Sat Mar 19, 2011 1:18 am
Posts: 9
Location: New Jersey
I've noticed the same actually. I used to love drinking and drinking while using, and since starts the subs I have absolutely no desire to whatsoever. I've only been on the subs for a little under a month now so I'm still a baby with these and therefore my experience probably isn't valid, but I've experienced the same over the past three weeks.

@Jimmy-Your friend used speed? That's crazy! I'm glad he's clean and sober now, but talk about a dangerous way to do it!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 26, 2011 1:06 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 15, 2010 5:08 am
Posts: 1503
Jimmy wrote:


On a side note, one of my former druggie friends got through opiate withdrawals with speed. He quit opiates and started smoking crack (do not try this at home!). But it worked for him. Two months of crack every day, then he quit. No opiate wd's and no crack wd's.

To each his own I guess.

Jimmy


That's what I used to do, back when I was quite crazy. Amphetamines work really well for withdrawals - they gave me energy to push through the pain and had me absorbed in activity when otherwise I'd be lying on the couch feeling sorry for myself.

Unfortunately, I wouldn't give up the speed in the end. I'd keep at it a bit too long, usually months, then eventually lose the plot and self-medicate with heroin. The cycle would continue.

I'd say your friend is definitely the exception to the rule. Switching between heroin and speed at different periods is the biggest IV poly-drug combination in my part of the world.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2011 4:02 pm 
Offline
Average Poster
Average Poster

Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 1:38 pm
Posts: 6
Hey guys,

I was a heavy drinker, it is pretty much what led me to the point I am at now, and i have been back and forth while on Sub as far as the drinking goes. I do have to admit it has helped though, kind of seems like the affect a nicotine patch would have on a cigarette craving.


Top
 Profile  
 
   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 07, 2011 3:00 pm 
Offline
6 Months or More
6 Months or More

Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 6:05 pm
Posts: 253
I get an occasional craving for a beer, but it is not serious. My alcohol and opiate use were tied together in a cycle, removing one has made stopping the other much easier.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: ALCOHOLISM AND SUBOXONE
PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 5:41 am 
Offline
Average Poster
Average Poster

Joined: Fri Aug 26, 2011 2:02 am
Posts: 9
I am an alcoholic and opiate addict. Alcohol at high levels leads me to lots of trouble ie) suicidal thinking, wreckless behavior not to mention physical and mental deterioration. I first noticed the few times I did methadone, the thought of alcohol was totally absent. This actually led me to suboxone. As my drinking progressed I got on suboxone and, voila. Even the thought of drinking alcohol makes me want to wretch. Suboxone has saved me from dying an alcoholic death. I, who struggle with staying sober even with AA and step work, can now be successful in life thanks to suboxone. Hopefully someone is studying these effects in the laboratory. And I am sure it is the opiate and not the naltrexone /naloxone that is doing it for me because liquid methadone gave me a similar result but not as great as suboxone. ....I have my life back after a very rough 20 years.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 7:56 am 
Offline
Power Poster
Power Poster

Joined: Sun Dec 06, 2009 4:12 pm
Posts: 78
I'm totally with you on that, gallen. I also was a hopeless alcoholic, that suffered relapse after relapse despite years in and out of AA. Finally, I quit drinking for a while and started taking pills. I could function much better on opiates than on alcohol. Well eventually it became time to stop the opiates, so I got on suboxone. I thought it would be a brief period of time that I was on the subs, just to get thru the withdrawals. But the suboxone takes away ALL alcohol cravings. I haven't drank since I started subs 16 months ago, and that is the longest period I've been sober ever.

I actually think my opiate addiction was a godsend, because it led me to subs and the "cure" for my alcoholism. I have told other alcoholics about this, but they can't get prescribed subs without getting themselves an opiate addiction, and no one wants to do that! Not saying that I would suggest they do it. I just feel it's a shame that they don't prescribe it for alcoholism. I hope they are studying it.

Oh, and by the way, I did try Campral for alcohol abuse. I took 6 horse pills a day for a year, and they tore my stomach up, but never gave me a second of peace from alcohol cravings. Suboxone is a miracle for me. My family cringe when I talk about trying to wean off of it, they know that nothing else could have helped me.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 10:06 am 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2010 10:39 am
Posts: 4028
Location: Sitting at my computer
My addiction counselor had explained to me years ago how the alcoholics body metabolizes alcohol into an opiate like substance and that's part of the reason why an alcoholic has such a wicked hard time getting clean.

This link explains it: http://self-renewal.com/alcohol%20addiction.htm#A

Click on A Physical Addiction and you can read from there or I have copied part of the article and pasted here:

Problem with alcohol metabolism. Physical addiction, the body’s normal reaction to too much alcohol too often, doesn’t affect everyone the same way. A select group of people who have a problem metabolizing alcohol are especially susceptible.

Alcohol metabolism is normally a simple chemical process. Basically the liver attempts to detoxify the body of alcohol by breaking toxic alcohol into acetaldehyde (another toxic chemical), and then reducing acetaldehyde to acetate or acetic acid which quickly convert to glucose in the blood. In “alcoholic” drinkers the liver functions poorly during this second step. It converts acetaldehyde to acetate at about half the speed of a “normal” drinker’s liver.

This malfunction causes two main problems. First of all, acetaldehyde builds in the blood. As a powerful toxin, acetaldehyde adds to the toxic damage alcohol causes the cells, which start to fight as much to protect themselves from acetaldehyde as from alcohol.

Secondly, acetaldehyde interacts with brain enzymes, creating isoquinolines, those opiate-like chemicals that tranquilize the brain and nervous system. This chemical byproduct doubles or even triples the sedative effect of the alcohol. What’s more, this added sedative in the brain dramatically increases the addictive power of alcohol. Because of it, withdrawal becomes more extreme. You go all the way from euphoric sedation while drinking, to a high-pitched buzzing anxiety when you withdraw. How do you get rid of the anxiety? Alcohol. Or other sedative drugs.

So the metabolic problem causes greater agitation in your cells, as they’re forced to fight another toxin. But it causes greater sedation as well. That’s why, when you get the alcohol “really working,” you’re raring to go yet calm and cool. How can you beat this high?

And all this because of a glitch in metabolism. Clearly this glitch is the main reason for your physical addiction. About 10% of all drinkers have this problem. They are the ones who become “alcoholic.”

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I've often wondered if this is why Suboxone helps alcoholics to stay clean, Suboxone is filling those opiate receptors that alcohol once did??

Regardless, I'm glad Suboxone helps you guys to stay alcohol free.

_________________
Be kind to yourself. Our character defects do NOT define who we are!


Top
 Profile  
 
   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 10:43 am 
Offline
Average Poster
Average Poster

Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2011 4:17 pm
Posts: 15
I used to like to have a drink in the past too. I mean, when I wanted a drink, I had a drink, usually a couple double shots of what I wanted. Since the suboxone, I destest the hate the taste of alchohol. Can't be bothered with it. I am happy to see that I am not the only one that has this blessing included in taking the suboxone. No drinking either. When I took opiates, they also turned be off alchohol too.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Our Sponsors
Suboxone Forum latest topics RSS feed Subscribe to the entire forum
 

 

 
Fond Du Lac Psychiatry
Dr. Jeffrey Junig, M.D., Ph.D.

  • Board Certified Psychiatrist
  • Asst Clinical Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group