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PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 5:55 am 
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Is anyone planning on staying on subs for life? Is it a bad thing to do so?


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 9:50 am 
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I have no plans of stopping suboxone personally...and there are no medical studies that show any harm from long-term suboxone use. On the other hand, there are plenty of people who ASSume Suboxone for long-term use is bad, but I think they are mostly either 1)Jealous they can't do the same, or 2)just don't know what the hell they are talking about.

In the end, it's what I feel comfortable doing, and how I want to live MY life...it's not up to anyone else to decide what's best for me...it's my decision to make....so I don't leave that up to anyone else to decide. I've made my decision, and it works for me. If it's not broke, then it don't need fixing...and my life the past 6 years with Suboxone has been far from what I did when I was eating/snorting Oxy...

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 10:16 am 
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if it keeps u clean, happy and able to function in everyday life, I see nothing wrong with it! :D


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 8:59 am 
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Choosing to stay on SUB for life is a safe, sound choice in some circumstances in my opinion. People who have altered their brain chemistry for many years and had multiple overdoses might take this into serious consideration given the potential for deadly relapse. I can't find fault in someone wanting to live a healthy, functional, satisfying life by using a relatively harmless medication.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 9:12 am 
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Hey perplexed,
I agree with your thoughts completely. . it just makes sense doesn't it? Other people facing potentially life threatening conditions manage them with medication all the time, so addiction to opioids being as potentially lethal as it is, also deserves life time treatment with medication if indicated and desired. it doesn't seem like those of us who've chosen long term, possibly life time bupe maintenance get enough support for our decision from friends, family, people in meetings,even some doctors, so thanks for your comments and support. And welcome to the forum! :-)


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 10:56 am 
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Suboxone is a great medication that will treat addiction. Addiction is something that stays with us a lifetime. I have yet to see any problems with taking medication long term to treat our addiction problems.

Unless there is a newer medication out there that will treat this disease, then Suboxone is the safest way to go. Too many addicts die when they try to quit Suboxone. We relapse and relapse can happen years after we quit taking this medication.

It is too dangerous for me to quit such a life saving medication. There is just too many positives that go along with Suboxone that way out the negatives of the med.
I have never been happier, more stable than I am today. I think this disease takes a life long treatment method.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 12:53 pm 
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I think staying a Sub lifer is fine so long as you take your health seriously through eating clean and regularly exercising. As above posters state drug addiction is a disease and for many people including myself it would be very challenging to confront the disease without a partial opiate agonist like suboxone, similarly as a diabetic may or may not need exogenous insulin shots as part of a lifetime regime. Cheers.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 9:49 pm 
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I am not sure what would have become of me had there not been Suboxone available. The thought of being completely off all opiates was very frightening and also not likely to happen.

Even being an alcoholic who got sober in AA 26 years ago. One would think I could just go back to meetings, start over, raise my hand as a newcomer, and find a sponsor. Well, I did do all that with the exception of finding a sponsor. No one wanted to sponsor someone who had been sober longer than them. (just guessing)

Now that I'm on a stable dose of Suboxone, (6 mg's) my life is continuing just like I never did opiates at all. The subject never comes up in conversation so most everyone I know don't know I'm on it. Only one brother and sister know. I never did tell my mother before she died. Why? What good would have come from it?

It is an easier decision for me because I am older than most of you here. At least in years I am. Meaning, I feel quite young in my head. The other parts do remind me from time to time. So yes, I'll be on it for the rest of my life. Can I say that for sure? No, we all change as we get older and the day may come when I want off of it and feel ready mentally to go through the process.

My only real concern is pain from surgery or whatever. I'll cross that bridge when and if it comes. For now, I'm good to go. I am so very grateful Suboxone was invented. I wonder how many of us would still be alive if Sub or Meth didn't exist.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 01, 2014 4:57 pm 
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rule62, you mentioned that your only real concern with the Suboxone was perhaps having to undergo surgery and the pain associated with that.

Well...when I first started the relationship with my current doctor, he actually went over a lot of things that were very helpful.
He gave me that Suboxone booklet that Reckitt Benckiser publishes with a bunch of info, here to help program, etc. In the middle of that booklet is an insert that has a place for the doctor to record his information for contact purposes; I believe it's actually a card that you can rip out to place in your wallet or purse. The idea is that if you needed surgery, either right away or something that was planned out, you would take out that card to inform the operating doctor you were in the middle of Suboxone therapy. Believe it or not, and I didn't actually believe this until I found myself in this situation, a great number of doctors don't even know what Suboxone is. Bizarre, right? Well I've dealt with doctors where I have to casually explain. And that's where the booklet comes in handy if you have it. But the card itself has contact numbers for your doctor and the hotline should any doctors want to call and ask any questions.
Because Suboxone has the blocker and everything else, there aren't a lot of options when it comes to pain management.
What my doctor told me is that upon giving the card to a doctor or nurse, they would inform him of the situation.
The arrangement would be for an anesthesiologist to dose you with fentanyl for the pain. The anesthesiologist would monitor you and basically use fentanyl, being it's incredibly strong, to override the block from the Suboxone...which is obviously where the monitoring comes into play.
My doctor told me this is standard and it's usually what they do. And if you think about it, it does make sense. Then again, it does open the flood gates so to speak when it comes to your addiction.
Now...what would they do if your pain was more on the side of chronic and not acute (for the extent of the injury)? Not really sure. I guess you would have to go in regularly to a hospital in order to receive that level of care because at the end of the day, for those of us on Suboxone, we aren't your typical patient: you can't just throw pain pills at us and expect us to take them - because they won't really work and what's the point when starting to take those pills again is pretty dangerous.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2014 1:35 am 
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I honestly could not see myself coming off of them. For me it a pain issue, if I don't take suboxone which helps my chronic scoliosis pain tremendously I would be back on pain pills. I've already had to do that once in the 2 and half years I've been on subs and I absolutely hated it. Took me right back to using to much and trying to get high so I went right back To my Dr and got back on subs. They saved my life and kept me and my family together. So yes I plan on being a lifer


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2014 1:54 pm 
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I never did answer back to the poster who addressed the surgery part of my post. Just didn't see it until now.

The card they give you telling medical personnel that you are a patient on Suboxone and needs more opiates than normal doesn't do much good if the people you're dealing with still know nothing about it.

Back in '12 I went through a very painful surgery. I had tapered down to 1 mg and stopped the day prior. Didn't matter. Nothing worked because my surgeon wouldn't give me what was needed. He refused to discuss it. All I got was some Lortab and later, one script of 5 mg Percoset. Nothing came close to dulling the pain. I suffered for two solid weeks until my body healed itself. Once I got back onto Suboxone I felt better. Much better. I really hope things are getting better.

It's good to keep this thread alive. We have so many people trying to get off of it that those of us who will stay on it for life need to know it's okay. Well, for me, it's OKAY. No harmful side effects, just some tiredness if I don't stay busy. It sure beats dying of an opiate overdose though.

So don't feel guilty if you're one of us. If and when it's time to taper and stop, you will.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2014 4:09 pm 
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You really brought up some excellent points in your post rule. I too worry about pain relief if ever I need surgery or am in an accident. Back during my active addiction, I had an abdominal hysterectomy leaving a large painful incision from hip to hip, and I didn't make my surgeon aware of my opioid addiction, so after the operation, I got absolutely no pain relief from the meds that the dr gave me. My tolerance was so incredibly high, that the morphine pump and the oral oxycodone didn't even touch the pain. I literally screamed my head off for two days, until they upped the morphine dosage and frequency and doubled the amount of oxy, and also gave me toradol. All of that, and I still did not admit that I had a problem. Having had that experience, I know what inadequate post op pain relief feels like, and here in the very rural south, where ignorance abounds, I'm afraid that once a doctor sees buprenorphine/addiction on my medical record, a card, detailing pain relief protocol for sub patients won't mean a thing to these physicians where I live! My family doctor didn't even know what it was, and I had to tell her. These days if I'm sick I just go to an urgent care place. I found a good one, and they are educated about suboxone, and treat me with dignity. I know if an emergency situation like that happens I'm going to have to strongly advocate for myself, and if I'm unable to, then I have made sure that several of my family members are well versed in bupe treatment, and what to do in case of emergency, if I'm unconscious or otherwise unable to speak for myself and in need of pain control. I strongly recommend having at least one person who can be your advocate in a situation like that. Just because we have the disease of addiction doesn't mean we deserve to suffer.

There are a great many threads here especially in the last few months, about tapering and stopping, so you make a great point also letting others who plan to use this treatment long term to life time, that there's nothing wrong with that decision. This is about our lives, and the quality of them as well as the preservation of them. Like you rule, I have no side effects to speak of, and have chronically relapsed my entire adult life. ... this certainly beats that lifestyle hands down! And it definitely beats the hell outta dying! So YES YES YES! it's absolutely ok to choose to remain on bupe, so don't let anyone tell you otherwise, or think that because so many others are stopping, that it's somehow wrong or not ok to stay on it if that's what you want. RULE 62 IS RIGHT! If and when the time is right to taper or jump, you'll know it! Excellent topic and posts!


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 22, 2014 6:50 pm 
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My apologies, I did not read the whole thread......but how do you guys find docs who will keep you on long term like that???? I have been cut off by several docs. Is it hit or miss or is there something I am missing here? I hugely feel that long term is right for me but unfortunately no docs agree. Help!!!


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 22, 2014 7:03 pm 
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Hi Monica, unfortunately, it is kind of a hit and miss thing right now, although more and more doctors are beginning to pay attention to the research that says that people who remain on bupe long term to indefinitely have better outcomes than those who are forced into tapering or quitting before they're ready to do so. When interviewing potential doctors, be sure to ask what their stance on this issue is, and let your feelings and thoughts about it be known as well. That way you're more likely to find a provider that's a good fit for you and your recovery. Also remember that many OTPs, formerly known as methadone clinics, are offering buprenorphine as a treatment option for patients, and they're less likely to force tapers just fir the sake of getting you of the medication than a doctor's office, because otps aren't bound by the 100 patient cap. However, in the beginning of treatment at an OTP, you'll have to dose daily before earning take home medication. Most OTPs only force tapers or detoxes for not following rules or failure to pay etc. So if you're unsuccessful finding a doctor to keep prescribing your bupe, this may be an option for you. I hope you're successful in finding a doctor who meets your needs.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2014 9:12 am 
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I have a great doctor, right now...but I know the day will come when she retires (she's 55+)..so I'll be out there once again, looking for another doctor..and trying to find one that has the same outlook on Sub as my current doctor....'if it aint broke, don't fix it'....

I've been on this site quite a while, usually I peruse the forums on my LGG3 without logging in, because I chase a toddler daily...and rarely do I sit at this computer for long periods of time unless I just don't feel good. I still like to try and keep up with the on-goings of the suboxone world, but have lost track of much of what's happening in the generic field, and the insurance front...

I hope I'm able to stay with it for as long as I feel necessary..which I have no qualms about long-term.
I would hope that one day I am able to find a doctor who will accept my insurance for payment, instead of me having to pay out-of-pocket $150 every 3 months.

And there's starting over with a different doctor once something happens to mine...going back to monthly visits versus every 3 months...etc...but that's the price I guess we all must pay.
I am lucky enough to have a $100 capped RX copay for my subs...which I hope changes since RB is selling off the Suboxone division and it's projected to sell for much less than what they've priced it at...

I guess they've ridden that bandwagon as long as they can, and now it's time to bail before they have to start taking cuts on the price...
If the above happens soon, maybe it'll affect the price next year for Subs. If not, and they end the $50 coupon deal...then my copay will actually be the $100 that my insurance states, as of now, I only pay $50, and the RB Coupon pays the other $50.

The Sub world sure has changed since I joined back in 2008. And it's still an ever-changing field, and I see more and more of these educated fools who have no clue who get to make decisions for us who are in the grind...which sucks. But that's the life..

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2014 7:51 pm 
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I have been on Suboxone for only a few months now and honestly if things keep going the way they are going then I see no reason to stop the Suboxone. I'm doing so well on it and am so productive. The happiest I've probably been in years.

Also, a lot of the stuff I've read about suboxone pretty much describes it as a maintenence medication meaning it's kind of like if you are a diabetic or have high blood pressure. You take pills to maintain those diseases. It's the same with suboxone. You take it to maintain your drug addiction. It just seems to me it's a drug that's meant to be taken long term to raise the chances of success.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2014 10:55 pm 
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I remember 4 years ago I went into my sub Dr.s office for the first time. I was sick to death with withdrawal from hydrocodone and methadone. After checking me over they gave me 8mg of subutex under my tongue.
In 30 minutes I began to feel just wonderful. I simply could not believe it...could this stuff really work???

A little pill could stop my withdrawal and make me feel like I did when I was a little girl and used to run through the grass barefooted at the beginning of the summer???? After all the things I had tried ...the treatment centers, the AA rooms..the NA rooms...the psychiatrists...a little pill could do all this for me?? Really?? You bet it did. The great thing is it continues to do so today. I wish every person coming into this chatroom thinking about maybe trying suboxone would just read this....and believe it....because it is true!!

I don't know if it worked for everyone else like this with your first visit...but this is absolutely how it worked for me!

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 13, 2016 10:23 pm 
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I want to quit but I'm still scared.... that's the main reason I'm still going! I have went from drug to drug since I was 14 years old and I am in a really good place right now and refuse to mess it up! I really think it depends on the Dr you go to because my Dr leaves that decision to me! When I had my last child (who I carried on subutex) I had a caesarian and during surgery and my recovery I was given my subutex and pain pills each day and I was fine..... I think if you talk to the anesthesiologist and they know what they are doing you should be able to be comfortable during recovery!


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2016 2:01 pm 
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Hi AngellSr, I could not agree more! It is a very personal journey we each have with this medication! When I first started, my feeling was that I would be at 24mgs for as long as I needed and had no plan to taper. Now,18 months later, I have tapered to 4mgs per day and feel great! My plan is to take the least amount needed to keep me feeling healthy! Hope you have a wonderful day! PS, not sure if you noticed that this is an old thread.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 21, 2016 9:09 pm 
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Many people in NA are anti-suboxone because they don't consider a person on it to be completely drug free. While suboxone does contain an opiate derivative, as far as I'm concerned, and I'm a member of NA, as long as you're taking it as prescribed you are clean. Many doctors don't believe in a lifelong prescription, probably because it's only around for less than twenty years. The longer you stay on it the worse the withdrawals can be, so I've been told. As addicts we have a personal struggle when it comes to major surgery such as open heart and other similar ones. Taking opiates is needed to prevent a strain on the heart, to prevent duress on a healing body, and to get the proper rest to heal. If you're on suboxone at the time your struggle is more difficult because you cannot take suboxone and opiates at the same time. NA depends on higher power to lift the obsession to use instead of a drug. I've had major surgery and was on morphine for seven days. The fellowship and my higher power helped me through it and I did not relapse afterwards. Eventually, most people come off suboxone because they are ready to take the leap of faith that's needed to trust in a higher power to lift the obsession. Now I have no problem if a person wants to stay on it for life. However, if health insurance companies ever decide to put a restriction on prolonged use most people will not be able to afford the heavy price tag that goes along with it. If you have no choice but to come off of it then that is when you will have a serious problem. There is nothing at this time to help suboxone withdrawals except methadone and opiates. Yes it saves lives but there are reported overdoses too. So, if you can't find the faith to trust in higher power by all means stay on it as long as you can. But be prepared to deal with any unforeseen developments.


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