It is currently Thu Aug 17, 2017 11:31 pm



All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Our Sponsors





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 37 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 10:42 pm 
I recently got taken to jail a couple months ago and my parents were nice enough to go get my suboxone and bring it in to the jail. Well of course they wouldnt give them to me except for one day and they gave me the same daily dose of 8 mgs and told me that that was "weening me off". lol how is giving someone their daily dose once for only a day weening? It was a nurse too so she obviously knows alot about her field :roll: I will say those were probably the worst 12 days of my entire night mostly because they never took me out of the holding cell for the 12 days so I was in withdrawal locked in a cage 24 hours a day. I didnt sleep a wink after the first night, just paced around the whole day and night restless and aching and all the other lovely symptoms that come along with withdrawal. The part that pissed me off was the CO's were walking up to the windows and holding their fists up the their eyes immitating like they were crying in essense calling me a baby because I was acting up and being crazy from the withdrawal and anxiety of being locked up. That was always my worst nightmare to have to withdrawal in jail, never thought it would actualy happen. Anyone else have this experience before?


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 11:04 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 10:03 pm
Posts: 991
I can't say that I have had that experience but I can imagine that would be the WORST withdrawal EVER! I'm glad you made it through to the other side. Welcome to the forum by the way!

Cherie

_________________
Criticism may not be agreeable, but it is necessary. It fulfills the same function as pain in the human body. It calls attention to an unhealthy state of things.

- Winston Churchill


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 29, 2010 7:16 am 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 12:55 pm
Posts: 4933
Location: Leesburg, FL
What a horrendous experience! I don't understand how the corrections dept(s) can get away with withholding someone's doctor-prescribed medications from someone - inmate or not. Seems like cruel and unusual punishment to me. It's not like you were taking street drugs either. Although personally I think if someone were to go to jail in withdrawals from something like heroin and will be there more than just a day or so, they should medicate them with suboxone. But that's just my thinking. I have no idea how they justify withholding a valid prescription. If it were me I would talk to a lawyer. But then I may be talking out of my ass. It's just that it seems very wrong to me. I'm glad you are home and back on your sub. Keep up the good work and welcome (again).

_________________
-As I have grown older, I've learned that pleasing everyone is impossible, but pissing everyone off is a piece of cake.

-I'm only responsible for what I say, not for what you understand.


Top
 Profile  
 
Our Sponsors
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 29, 2010 1:25 pm 
Yea it was pretty horrible, I didnt have money for a lawyer so I got a public defender (if you want to call that a lawyer hah) and he was shocked when I told them that I was denied my meds.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 29, 2010 1:51 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 16, 2010 2:20 pm
Posts: 635
When I was arrested in 1983 I was addicted to heroin. At the time I was doing, oh, 50 bags a day. Usually 10 bags at a time. I'd fix about once every two or three hours, depending on how I was feeling.

Unlike you, my incarceration was not 12 days. It was 16 years, 9 months. I couldn't make bail because my bail was, if I remember correctly, $2 million.

That was, without a doubt, the most brutal withdrawal I've ever been through. I was sick -I'm talking doubled over vomiting and shitting on myself sick- for about two weeks, with the peak coming around the 8th or 9th day. Words really fail to adequately articulate what it felt like. I remember it vividly. And I will never, ever forget it.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 29, 2010 2:02 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 12:43 am
Posts: 1019
Location: Buffalo New York
Now adays if you are honest with the cops an you get a nice one they will reccomend detox b4 you are sent to jail but this is mainly for herion addicts who they know cant just be sent into a jail because of the danger it could bring on them and the small chance of the person passing away because of how strong there WDs could be.

as of being put in the same situation you were in no i cant say i have but i would talk with you parents about this an maybe see about seeing a real lawyer cause im sure that they prolly can take some action on the place you were sent.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 29, 2010 2:14 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 16, 2010 2:20 pm
Posts: 635
Bboy42287 wrote:
Now adays if you are honest with the cops an you get a nice one they will reccomend detox b4 you are sent to jail but this is mainly for herion addicts who they know cant just be sent into a jail because of the danger it could bring on them and the small chance of the person passing away because of how strong there WDs could be.


Bboy, opiate withdrawals have practically zero potential of resulting in fatality. Benzodiazepines, are a different story, and rapid detox from those can have fatal consequences, but it is rare in the extreme for opiate withdrawal to result in a fatality.

I'm not trying to bust your chops or anything, this is just the reality of it. Opiate withdrawal is extremely miserable and uncomfortable, but rarely -extremely rarely- fatal.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 29, 2010 2:54 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member

Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2009 7:36 pm
Posts: 879
Location: Wisconsin
Junkie is most certainly correct. You may feel like you are going to die. You may wish you would. But opiate withdrawal will not cause seizures or death.

Back to the main topic, I have heard this over and over again. I too wonder, especially in the age we live in where pretty much everything sides with the criminal or the minority (and in this case I'm in that category) I really think we need to get this in front of a judge for it to stop. I recently found some news stories about a case where a woman was supposed to serve something like 15 days for a minor offence and was on Suboxone. They refused to give her the Suboxone in jail - even if she provided it. She took them to court. Unfortunately rather than let this case set pressident, they (wisely for them, poorly for us) changed her sentence so she didn't have to serve the time in exchange for community service or house arrest. That would have helped, had the case forced the jail to provide the meds. It's probably just a matter of time until someone gets this in front of a court and it stops. I take Lipitor for high cholesterol. It won't, in the short term, kill me not to take it. Would they be allowed to with-hold that from me? Dr. Junig has written about a patient that he had who was on probation and was forced off of Suboxone. He obviously had a legitimate scrip from Dr. J yet somehow this probation agent took it upon himself to tell him he could not take it or that would violate his probation and send him back to jail. Dr. J wrote letters but to no avail. Again, this needs to get in front of a judge. We can't ask someone of Mexican decent for proof of citizenship in Arizona but we can withhold legitimately prescribed medication from American citizens. Yep, that's the United States of America in 2010. Lord I hope that starts to change soon, but now I'm getting way off subject.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 29, 2010 3:17 pm 
Offline
Super Poster
Super Poster
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2010 9:12 am
Posts: 123
My God! I have always been grateful that I didn't end up in jail. If I had gotten what I deserved, I would have. How horrible to have to go through WD like that! I can't imagine it, but I guess when you are in that situation you don't have any choice. It all goes back to the same old problem: very few people understand the disease of addiction. I don't know what it will take to change this. I am so sorry that you guys had to go through that.


Top
 Profile  
 
   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 29, 2010 3:37 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 16, 2010 2:20 pm
Posts: 635
rossma wrote:
My God! I have always been grateful that I didn't end up in jail. If I had gotten what I deserved, I would have. How horrible to have to go through WD like that! I can't imagine it, but I guess when you are in that situation you don't have any choice. It all goes back to the same old problem: very few people understand the disease of addiction. I don't know what it will take to change this. I am so sorry that you guys had to go through that.


You know something, back then I was full of rage about it. But looking back at it, I guess in a lot of ways, I got what I deserved. Yes, I am an addict, and I fully accept and embrace the disease model as does the American Medical Association and the American Psychological Association, so I guess I'm in good company. So, having to endure withdrawal as a result of going to jail for crimes? I don't know, to some extent, I don't even feel sorry for myself for that one.

But, let's take a hypothetical situation:

Junkie A gets clean in January of 2010, with the help of Suboxone. He begins counseling and becomes quite stable on Suboxone, but does have pending court cases that are the result of crimes committed while out there "ripping and running" -- perhaps doctor shopping or possession of a controlled substance.

Junkie A finally has his court date in March 2010 and the judge is pissed off that day because some dope fiend broke into his house and stole his stereo, so he throws the book at Junkie A and sends him to jail, do not pass Go, do not collect $200.

Under those circumstances, does the state have the right to intercede in the legitimate treatment plan of a patient and force them off suboxone by refusing to allow it -even if Junkie A is willing and able to foot the bill- while Junkie A is incarcerated?

And what about when Junkie A gets out of jail but is still on probation or parole afterward? Again, does the state have the jurisdiction to dictate the terms and conditions of a parolee's medical treatment?

I think it's a really, really slippery slope we get on as a society to allow the state to force someone off ANY medication that is prescribed for legitimate purposes.

Thoughts?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 29, 2010 3:41 pm 
Im not sure how it is state to state but I know here in illinois you are able to stay on suboxone or methadone while on probation. My probation officer even said to me he views it as a "miracle life saving drug" and thinks I should stay on it as long as I feel I want to. At first he didnt quite see it that way but Ive had in depth discussions with him about it that have taken up the entire visit and after explaining to him how much its helped me and its could possibly cause me to relapse and maybe overdose and die if I stopped my suboxone then he started to get on board about it.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 29, 2010 4:01 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 12:43 am
Posts: 1019
Location: Buffalo New York
yea i reread my post i should of been more clear.

THe reason they send most herion addicts into detox asap is cause they have notice a rise in that most herion addicts are useing benzos in combination with herion. an thats why they will detox them b4 they send them to jail.

but you are 100% right that its very very rare to die just from herion WD or any opiate for that matter. should of been more clear but thankyou for pointing that out.

as of you what if question JUnkie

As of the first part im not sure

But the afterwards getting out on parole or the other way. i think what it comes down to is these people are so scard to go back to jail that they dont fight it an just accept it if that makes sense?

I know myself that i would rather just accept it and not take sub then even have any chance of going back meaning instead of trying to get leagal help or fight it to take my meds i just have to bite my lip and shut up.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 29, 2010 4:22 pm 
I remember reading somewhere about some semi famous rapper who was incarcerated and he was addicted to xanax he was prescribed and took a huge dose everday around 16mgs daily. He begged and pleaded with the jail to allow him his medication because of the danger of xanax withdrawal and they refused. He was pyschotic from the withdrawal for days and days and they still never gave him his xanax. He ended up dieing from seizures and other complications from the withdrawal.


Top
  
 
   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 29, 2010 6:27 pm 
Offline
Super Poster
Super Poster
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2010 9:12 am
Posts: 123
And yet I remember reading that a famous star who went to jail last summer to serve a 3-month sentence, was given her "prescription drugs" while incarcerated, and was released after two weeks for "good behavior", due to overcrowding. Hell if that was me I can guarantee you that my sorry butt would still be sitting there in jail!

I think that it would be terrible not to give someone their prescribed Sub while they were in jail! I can imagine they probably figure that if the other fellow jail residents found out about it then everyone would be requesting to be on it, and so it is easier for them just to deny everyone than deal with it. If someone was on it at the time that they were sentenced, as you describe, I think it is very wrong to deny them and as I said, if it were some big famous star, you can bet that they would receive it!

The injustice.....................


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 29, 2010 7:41 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 12:43 am
Posts: 1019
Location: Buffalo New York
Lindsay Lohan is a perfect example. She is on a shit load of meds an when she was in prison i dont know how long but she was given all her meds an one was a benzo! But i also read when these people go to jail they really dont go to the jail you and i call prison they go to like almost a half way house type deal. cause they wouldnt last a minute an well lets face facts MONEY BUYS EVERYTHING!!!!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 29, 2010 9:13 pm 
Yea their reasons for not giving it to me were " I would save it up and commit suicide but overdosing" which is impossible with the ceiling effect and the other was "I could save it up and trade it to other inmates" which is bullshit because A) I was in solitary the whole time and B) They know damn well that they watched me take it the one day they gave it to me and saw that it dissolves under your tongue so you cannot cheek a sub and spit it out later. Fuck those bastards I forgot to add that I was on phenazepam when I was arressted and in a black out and the one thing I remember was being pepper sprayed the first night in jail because I wouldnt let them basicaly molest me by grabbing my genitals while they were ripping my clothes off. I was realy out of it and was confused and when they asked me to take my clothes off I didnt respond and then they started grabbing at my balls to rip my pants off and I said "no I can do that myself" and motioned to take my pants off and they considered moving my hand down to my belt resisting and unloaded the pepper spray on me. I was screaming in agony and was screaming for them to let me use that fountain thing they have to wash your eyes out after being sprayed and they threw me in the cell locked it and said "use the toilet to wash out your fucking eyes". Another few days into my stay my mom came to visit me and I was talking to her and I used the word "fuck" while saying "man mom you have no idea how much this fucking sucks" and they grab my violently for that yank me outta the visitor booth and I was so fed up I make the noise you make when youre about to hawk a loogie to pretend I would spit on them and this CO takes his thumb and jams it right into my throat under my adams apple. I realy wish i could somehow get a lawyer and get a lawsuit over all that but Im sure they would just deny it and get away with it.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Oct 30, 2010 9:00 am 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 16, 2010 2:20 pm
Posts: 635
Man, that brings back a lot of memories. And NONE of them are good. I have literally lost track of how many times I've been beaten to a pulp by cops or prison guards.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Oct 30, 2010 2:00 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2009 3:20 am
Posts: 516
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle-old/332/paey.shtml

Quote:
Richard Paey, 45, of Hudson, Florida, is disabled. Injured in a traffic accident in 1985 while attending law school at the University of Pennsylvania, Paey suffered a severely herniated disk in his lower back. A first surgery failed, and a second operation, an experimental procedure involving screw inserted into his spine, only aggravated matters. It left his backbone splintered and the mass of nerves surrounding it mangled. Paey, who relies on a wheelchair for mobility, was left in excruciating chronic pain, which he treated with prescribed opioid pain relievers.

But Paey's odyssey from being just another of America's tens of millions of chronic pain sufferers to a Florida jail cell was about to get underway. Paey and his family had been living in New Jersey, where a physician prescribed large amounts of opioid pain relievers for Paey, but when they moved to Florida, they could not find doctors willing to provide the high-dosage prescriptions needed to fend off the pain that tormented him.

Paey, who has also been diagnosed with advanced multiple sclerosis, resorted to filling out prescription forms obtained from his New Jersey doctor and eventually came to the attention of the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Pasco County Sheriff's Office. Investigators reported watching Paey and his wheelchair roll into one pharmacy after another to pick up fraudulent prescriptions, adding up to more than 200 prescriptions and 18,000 pain pills in a year's time.

No one could take so many pills, investigators suspected. Paey must be a drug dealer. And they charged him as one, even though no one has ever presented any evidence that Paey did anything with the pain pills except ease his own pain. Now, after two mistrials, plea bargain offers made and withdrawn, and plea bargain offers rejected by Paey, prosecutors have managed to win a conviction. A week from today, a Florida judge will decide Paey's fate, although if the judge follows state law, there is not much to decide. As a convicted Florida "drug trafficker," Paey faces a mandatory minimum sentence of 25 years in prison.


Check that story out. Pretty bad, but he's free now.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Paey

and:
Quote:
Paey served three and a half years at the Tomoka Correctional facility in Daytona Beach, Florida. During this time, the state provided a direct IV pump of morphine directly into his back to alleviate his pain. The strength of the morphine drip prescribed to him was stronger than the "morphine equivalent" of the amount of oxycodone that he was arrested for using in the first place.

_________________
Image
mmmm donuts!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Oct 30, 2010 8:13 pm 
Offline
3 Months or More
3 Months or More
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 09, 2010 4:57 pm
Posts: 97
This is horrible. I cannot imagine the sheer torture. I've gone through withdrawals in the comfort of my own home and it was absolutely the most worst experience of my life. I cannot imagine the horror of having to go through the same experience in the confines of a jail cell.

The story James told above is similar to the story of a friend of mine. She was a former client who had been arrested for something minor, but had a massive amount of painkillers on her. The State assumed she must be selling them so they charged her with trafficking. She was sentenced to five years in the Florida State Penitentiary and was forced to undergo cold turkey withdrawals. She said it was hell.... I can't imagine it. It physically pains me to even THINK about it.

And whoever said in this thread that we are traveling down a slippery slope when we allow the government to rule over our medications is spot on. It IS cruel and unusual. Unfortunately, unless a case goes to the Supreme Court and Federal Law states that an incarcerated defendant is to receive their prescribed medications, each state, or county even, will continue to deny people on pain medication their meds.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 31, 2010 10:11 pm 
Offline
Super Poster
Super Poster
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2010 9:12 am
Posts: 123
I'm not knowledgeable about how the legal system works, but from a moral standpoint I think that when things happen of this nature are so wrong. I cannot imagine the suffering that people must have to go through when incarcerated. I could have been sent to jail in the past, and it very well could have been me. There but for the grace of God go I.

I hope that there are some good people on the front lines of these matters who are in a position to work on these things to effect change. I can't see what is to be gained by letting someone just suffer through it on their own! There are many injustices to be overcome.

~Rossma


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 37 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Our Sponsors
Suboxone Forum latest topics RSS feed Subscribe to the entire forum
 

 

 
Fond Du Lac Psychiatry
Dr. Jeffrey Junig, M.D., Ph.D.

  • Board Certified Psychiatrist
  • Asst Clinical Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group