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PostPosted: Tue Aug 25, 2015 3:24 pm 
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Disclaimer: I just joined this forum and this is my first post. Please move or remove it if it does not belong here.

I began shooting heroin just six months ago after 12 years clean without a single relapse. I had shot heroin for 3 years, gotten clean with methadone and stopped heroin completely and entirely. Forever, or so I thought. I was on and tapering down on methadone for about a year when my back went out around 30mgs and I was down for the count with excruciating and mind-numbing pain. I continued crawling into the methadone clinic each day and continued tapering though as my PCP prescribed Naproxen and I writhed in pain and my muscles atrophied from only lying in bed the rest of the time. I was at 11mgs of methadone when an MRI finally revealed (former heroin addict or not) that my back was a wreck and I needed to be in pain management. I was transitioned from 11mgs of methadone onto a daily regimen of a combination of short acting (instant release) as well as long acting (extended release) morphine.

Morphine replacement therapy (though it was not intended to be this in my case) worked for me. Everyone expected me to totally screw this up. I think most people (in the USA, anyhow) would believe that someone who shot heroin for three years and then abruptly stopped doing so with the assistance of methadone less than a full year prior is probably not a good candidate to start being handed several bottles of morphine to each month. I had standards though and refused to revert back to any of my old ways. Not once did I misuse my morphine in any way. I never used it to get high and I never experienced withdrawal. I never even increased my dose! I never ran out early and actually had an arsenal of extra ones in case the rug ever got yanked out from underneath me. My doctor actually thanked me for being such a model patient and never putting him in an ethical spot upon completion of my whole back nightmare.

Fortuitously, I really dodged a bullet with methadone just by pure dumb luck I have come to realize in retrospect. I was headed for the jumping off point with methadone which was going to involve painful withdrawal and ongoing and seemingly endless fatigue, cravings out of desperation not to have to feel so bad physically and emotionally and quite likely a relapse back onto heroin. Through this relapse, I am just now learning what happens with methadone at the end. Had I not been put on long term morphine at such a crucial juncture in my recovery from dangerous and deadly heroin abuse, I highly doubt I would have stayed away from heroin for 12 years as I did without a single exception until six months ago.

I was on morphine for 8 of those 12 away from heroin years. Then my back got better and I successfully tapered off of the morphine over about a year. I did it on my own terms and it was what I wanted to do (be opiate free) so I would repeatedly throw myself into minor withdrawal and chipped away at my 120mg per day (15mgs at at time and then 7.5mgs at a time) morphine dependency (not to be confused with abuse) until I was off of them in 2011.

I thought I was going to feel great once I was off of the morphine. Sadly and at the cost of 3+ years of my life wasted feeling really bad both physically and emotionally, I could not have been more wrong about that. I came off of morphine in 2011 and never felt good again. I could not get out of my pajamas. I could not function. I did not feel motivated to do anything at all. I stopped working and stayed on disability. My mind became very foggy and my memory and ability to concentrate was terrible. MY ears began ringing as they do at the onset of opiate withdrawal but I had never had tinnitus before. I became completely isolated and stopped doing what I have been doing for a living throughout the years of my life during my pre-heroin and off heroin but on morphine years. I dropped from 133 pounds to 112 in that last month of coming off morphine which has been medically investigated but there is no explanation and I did not even begin to be able to eat and gain any of it back until I relapsed on heroin six months ago.

The fact that I was on morphine is very significant and I am able to see that it was ORT for heroin now.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opioid_replacement_therapy
Without realizing it, the pain management doctor who put me on morphine when I was down to 11mgs of methadone saved me from what would have probably been when I came off the methadone.

More importantly, I am able to see why it was so easy for me not to ever abuse morphine right after having lived a rather sordid life of heroin abuse just less than a year prior to getting on morphine. The morphine served as opiate replacement therapy (ORT) much like buprenorphine does. I had the desire to stay off of heroin and was given tools (methadone and then morphine) to do so. The tools were a privilege and I did not dare abuse them. I did not feel the need to either. I felt fine and my chaotic heroin addiction was over. I just felt relieved and was not interested in screwing up a good thing that was working very well.

One day several years after I got off of morphine, I decided to take half of a 15mg instant release morphine pill that I had leftover from years earlier because my head had been aching for several days. Something completely unexpected and incredible happened. I did not feel high (taking half of the smallest dosage it comes in without a tolerance) but I did feel a strong desire to get out of my damn PJs immediately and into the shower. I put makeup on for the first time in several years. I felt like doing totally normal things like going to the grocery store, eating and tackling things on my 'to do' list or more appropriately, my list of things that literally never got done. Before that day, I felt so bad that on a good day I still brushed my teeth twice and that is about all I could do.

When I took the measly 7.5mgs of morphine for the headache, I stopped feeling cold. I stopped sneezing. I felt totally normal for the first time since I had come off the morphine a few years prior. The exhausting fatigue vanished. I felt like eating. I felt like doing the things that I had lost the desire to do for over three years. I also knew that I was in real trouble then too because I had just figured out that opiates made be feel better and it was the lack thereof that was robbing me of my ability to function. I began to take pills from time to time in order to function and feel normal. This, of course, led me back to heroin when I could no longer get them but had finally taken enough pills to develop an opiate tolerance and was facing opiate withdrawal. That is when I relapsed for the first time after 12 years with heroin.

For the approximately 3 years after I came off of morphine until I relapsed on heroin, I felt like I was in a constant state of mild opiate withdrawal. I was cold all of the time, year-round. I began sneezing several times a day, everyday, which was new. I had no energy. I could not get up. I was exhausted, depressed and incapable of thinking my way out of it.

I would routinely actually say out loud that I felt like I was in opiate withdrawal. I told my psychiatrist who prescribes my clonazepam that I felt I had sustained some kind of permanent opiate receptor damage or something. He explained that the receptors repair themselves and perhaps they do to some extent but I could never be convinced that mine ever did or ever will completely recover.

I accept that I will take clonazepam for life because it cured a torturous OCD that I suffered with from 1st grade until age 36. It works and I will take it for life. I also take estrogen to replace the estrogen that my body has stopped producing since I have gone into menopause. Having a low estrogen level causes symptoms that mirror opiate withdrawal very closely. These menopausal symptoms can be controlled with the use of HRT (hormone replacement therapy) so I take estrogen to control unpleasant menopausal symptoms. I will do so for life, if necessary.

I feel my opiate receptors are damaged which feels terrible and that the solution lies in replacing the missing opiates. This seems to work for me even if the replacement opiate does not come with euphoric effects. Have you checked your opiate receptors lately? lol Seriously, the body screams for opiates when things are out of balance. I believe this problem can and should be solved with opiate replacement therapy (buprenorphine, Subutex, Suboxone or morphine.)

I don't care about the stigma that AA has imposed for those on ORT. They can keep their chips and deny me access to their club while I abstain from heroin use and save my life and they make their amends, talk about how high they used to be, work on their character defects and accept relapse as part of recovery. I don't care whether people consider me to be clean on buprenorphine or not and I won't be shamed into suffering or risking failure and dying. I do not want to risk my life anymore by relapsing because I am up against something so powerful. Even if I do abstain from all opiates after having taken them long term, I already know I will feel horrible both physically and mentally. I do not believe this is a spiritual problem and I don't plan to pray my way out of it either.

I am seriously going to ask my doctor to put me back on extended release morphine even though my back stopped hurting five years ago. I'm pretty sure my doctor will not ethically be allowed to do so. This is not an accepted medical practice here in the United States but perhaps it should be. It certainly is in other countries according to the Wikipedia page I posted a link for above. I found it when I googled, 'opiate replacement therapy.'

I am currently on day 11 of taking Subutex after my latest detox, retox, detox, retox, detox, retox, etc. I am trying to talk myself into staying on it this time but I am also terrified and have very little faith that I would ever be able to get off it. That is quite a commitment to make so this is not an easy decision. Perhaps it should be though because when I am on buprenorphine, I am about as interested in using heroin as I am in taking aspirin when I do not have a headache. I know that I could stay clean if I stayed on it but I am terrified to be on it and terrified not to be. My personal experience with opiates and online research has lead me to conclude that total abstinence from opiates and refusing ORT is a dangerous route since failure is a very real and deadly possibly and I already know that I will feel bad forever unless I address the damage my opiate receptors have sustained.

Replacing the opiates has worked for me with methadone, morphine and now Subutex so I am going to say that ORT definitely can work based upon my personal experience with it. I have detoxed about eight times with Subutex in the past six months. Each time I relapse back onto heroin within days of the last dose of Subutex. Several of my relapses after detoxing have involved accidental overdoses with a lowered tolerance- any one of which could easily have been fatal.

Having my opiate receptors out of whack is a serious problem that cannot be ignored. This is causing me to feel terrible and as of late, it is causing me to relapse and overdose on heroin. Without Subutex, my body screams for opiates. Why? Because my body needs opiates just to feel normal now. That is what the medical science says and that is exactly what it feels like. It takes an opiate (be it buprenorphine, morphine or heroin) in order for me to not feel completely tortured by cravings, feel fatigued and experience a complete loss of enjoyment of life now. Without opiates, I cannot function. Without opiates, I experience crippling depression and anxiety. Fortunately, there are opiates that do not require an increased dosage in order to work and do not cause euphoria.

Q: How long does PAWS (post acute withdrawal syndrome) last? A: Nobody seems to know for sure but I do know that even years after I had last taken morphine or any opiate for that matter, I still felt awful. I was still sneezing and freezing. My ears were ringing. I was still too exhausted to even begin to think about doing things to possibly help myself like exercise, for example. Life as I knew it was over anyway so the fact that I could say I was abstinent from all opiates does not really matter to me if I have to feel awful in order to be able to say that. I could not function or think clearly until I relapsed which lead me to where I am now: clean from heroin for 12 days (instead of 12 years now, sadly) but without painful acute withdrawal and with no desire to use heroin thanks to Subutex.

I stopped the bleeding (deadly heroin addiction) with Subutex. At the moment, I am off heroin and not yet addicted to the Subutex after 11 days. I could stop the Subutex but my recent track record says I will relapse back onto heroin if I do that again. I wish I could take something as well known and understood as morphine instead of something so controversial and less understood as buprenorphine. I am so afraid I will talk myself out of staying on Subutex again, relapse, overdose and die. My gut is so afraid of it somehow. I'm not exactly sure why. I'm in real danger and I know it.

I have read about it extensively online and disagree with the abstinence approach. I know that it took methadone to get me right off of heroin 13 years ago after three years of always wanting to be clean somehow but not knowing how to be. I remember walking into a clinic early one morning 13 years ago (no questions asked or huge reservations about it, really), spilling my guts, getting dosed, feeling fine, getting my life back on track and never shooting heroin again. As one of my AA friend's once said, 'Getting clean from heroin was about as courageous of a decision as deciding to exit a burning building.' LOL

ORT seems like a rational thing to do (stop the bleeding right now) even if I never get off it. Why have I been so resistant to the idea of maintenance or ORT? My close friends who have seen me suffer these six months are totally supportive. My friends who are in AA (I never was) are not. I am angry at them for not being supportive. I have flat out asked them how they would feel if I relapsed and died after I chose not to stay on ORT. If they would feel the least bit responsible for discouraging me as senior members of AA who sponsor others and to whom the more vulnerable tend to listen to in times of grave drug danger. I have thought of how infuriated my parents (who do not know I relapsed at all but are both doctors) would be to know that I was strongly urged not to stay on buprenorphine by 'so and so in AA' God forbid, should I lose this battle.

My PCP, psychiatrist and of course, Subutex doctor have all strongly urged me to stay on this medication. Interestingly enough, not one of the inpatient doctors who administered Subutex for inpatient short term detox recommended that I stay on it though. Buprenorphine maintenance would probably significantly decrease the need for their jobs and not being on ORT would almost ensure that I would return to their facility in no time and I did. I am suspicious of them for not even mentioning ORT as an outpatient option. Ever. The message was abstinence only when the medical research shows this to be statistically less successful than ORT. Rehab is such big business. My insurance company basically paid $2,000 per day for eight days each time I chose to go inpatient and humanely detox from heroin with buprenorphine. They did this three times in the last six months and would do it again and again. I relapsed within days every single time. Now they only want to pay for the medication but not the cost of seeing an outpatient Subutex doctor who prescribes the medication. Amazing. It would be well worth it for me to pay out of pocket and hopefully I will continue to do so when considering what is at stake here: my life.


Sincerely,
Abby


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 25, 2015 8:34 pm 
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Hi Abby,

Welcome to the forum and to the place you truly belong. Based on your story it is my belief that you may have permanently damaged your receptors due to being on morphine for so long. Most doctors would tell us that they will repair itself in time, but how much time? You gave it a good shot and maybe if you had forced yourself to go workout at a gym or jog or something to get your natural endorphins working again it may have worked. Okay, probably so. But who cares? What's done is done and I think you should stay on buprenorphine long term like so many of us have chosen to do.

How did you convince your doctor to give you Subutex? Most will not and only prescribe Suboxone unless you are pregnant. My brother gets it from his doctor but it is mostly for back pain like you. I've never even asked. I do just fine on Suboxone and am living a very happy life.

BTW, I too am 28 years sober, and got that way only because of AA and one person who helped me. So I do know what you're talking about if and when you mention taking ORT. You can even quote the Big Book where it says "we know very little" but that won't get you anywhere. If you want to continue going to AA, and I still think it's a good program and lifestyle, just go and don't mention the Subutex. They don't understand and you won't be able to change that.

Unfortunately, that kind of thinking kills addicts. The person who saved my life and was also my sponsor had to take medication for depression and OCD personality. AA members were not pleased with one of their "old timers" being on meds. He ended up drinking again only because the doctors wouldn't prescribe what he needed. He was on the governments dime due to not being able to work because of his mental illness. He ended up hanging himself in front of the medical building who chose not to help him. Sorry for the bummer story but you get the point.

Your screen name caught my attention because it is the same one I use on Addiction Survivor Network website. I hope people there won't confuse us!

I also moved your thread over to the Introductions section where it belongs.

Once more. Welcome to the forum and we hope you will stay with us for the long haul.

rule62

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 25, 2015 10:08 pm 
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Hello Abby,
Wow that is quite a post friend. Welcome .

Imo, you are someone who does indeed need to be on and stay on Buprenorphine. The many reasons you have givin and your rate of relapse in the past tell me "drug free " may not be possible.

I cant let others in there recovery try to correct or worse tell me im doing something wroug or not doing enough by taking this lifesaving medicine in mine. Ive heard both in the past.

If you do stay on subs, you wont need to worry about PAWS. Sounds like youve lived though PAWS before but it ever seemed to stop . .until ORT started..

Just a few opinions on your post.. please keep posting Abby...


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2015 11:40 am 
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Hi Rule 62,

Thanks for moving my thread and for your kind reply to my post. I definitely suffer with the art of brevity and am sort of all over the place so I will try to stick with one topic and try to leave my comments under the correct topics. Please feel free to shuffle my posts and replies wherever you feel they should be and I assure you I will not only not take offense but will be grateful because I am having a difficult navigating and knowing where to post things. I'm glad you're at the helm here.

Initially my post was entitled, "Slow Release Morphine as ORT." I have seen you mention things along the lines of, 'until something better comes along' and wanted to make the point that that 'something' might already exist and could just be Extended Release Morphine. I was wondering what you thought about that. Many would say it is ludicrous but based upon my 8 year responsible use of it for pain management just a year after quitting heroin with methadone, needing pain management and being transitioned from 11mgs of methadone onto ER (extended release) and IR (instant release) morphine, I KNOW it can work.

I have an appointment with my PCP tomorrow and am quite seriously going to bring up the idea of being put back on morphine as ORT. My PCP had taken over the prescribing of my morphine prescriptions in the last few years I was on it and I am starting to see this as an issue of my ongoing care. My PCP was even involved in helping me through the withdrawals I experienced with tapering by prescribing clonidine.

I have been completely out of pain for 5 years, told my PCP this and tapered off of the morphine at my own pace over a year in 2011. Since I never felt worse after getting off of the morphine and it seems clear that I have opiate receptor damage upon stopping morphine, it stands to reason that morphine would remedy this.

I think I have a very reasonable reasonable argument. The issue of whether I would abuse it after being an intravenous heroin user should work in my favor because I, unequivocally, have proven that I am able to responsibly do this and have done it already for 8 years in a row. This is well documented in my medical records.

I'm not kidding and will let you know what happens because I aim to try and make oral morphine a form of ORT based upon it already being an excepted form or ORT in other countries such as Austria, Slovenia, Bulgaria and other EU nations including the UK.

I even remember reading a very interesting post from someone overseas who was basically saying that we Americans are so backward and I could see his point which was that when someone is addicted to Hydrocodone, say, then why on earth would you give them a much more powerful opiate that is difficult if not impossible to ever get off of instead of weaning them off of the hydrocodone? I think he has a valid point too.

Unfortunately, the only reply I saw to this post was from someone who was explaining how ridiculous his idea was because everyone here would abuse it but it was exactly how this guy in another country was being treated with ORT. They were tapering people off of the drugs they were addicted to, basically. If you think about it, this makes a lot of sense.

In my experience, if you truly want to be off of heroin or any drug, this is made much more easily done than said by also using some kind of ORT. I actually was on morphine for 8 years and never once reverted to my old ways because I had the desire to be clean from heroin and the tool to do just that: morphine. Like buprenorphine, it took care of my opiate receptors so the urge to do heroin or abuse the morphine was just gone. I felt fine but never high with slow release morphine used correctly.

I will post a link to the Wikipedia page for ORT and anyone can see, plain as day, that other countries are using slow-release morphine as ORT.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opioid_replacement_therapy


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2015 1:06 pm 
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I also wanted to address the other things that Rule 62 mentioned in his reply.

-screen name: Total coincidence that we would both choose AbbyNormal as a screen name. We must both be 'Young Frankenstein' fans and great minds think alike. haha I have no problem at all changing it though to avoid confusion if only I had the slightest clue how to do so.

-Interesting that I too have been sober (from alcohol I assume you mean) for most of my adult life (about 26 or 27 years) but without AA. I read Rational Recovery's 'The Small Book' by Jack Trimpey about a decade after I stopped drinking and thought I could have written that book myself had I chosen to write about my experience with alcohol abstinence. For those who do not like AA, you may want to check out Rational Recovery. There are no meetings because those are considered another addiction and perhaps it is best to just close an ugly chapter of your life and move on. AA is not for everybody and neither is RR.
https://rational.org/index.php?id=1

I'm sorry to hear about your sponsor's tragic story and believe that AA can be downright dangerous. Ultimately, we are each responsible for our decisions when you get right down to it but AA can impede that process and it sounds like this man was bullied by other AA members. You say that your sponsor saved your life but I believe that was all you. Nobody can quit for you and I take full credit for my personal accomplishments.

AA can serve to creating a sense of community by providing routine and somewhere to go with people to talk to. The problem for me is that I cannot give that much power and energy and talk about drugs and alcohol that much and expect to remain free of them for long. There are other ways to be social and stay busy which is very important for someone like me who has become so isolated.

I just discovered http://www.meetup.com/ which provides a real variety of things to do with other people in order to accomplish remaining engaged and occupied. I even found a group for the OCD for which I was cured with clonazepam by! It was worthwhile to go meet up with 5 random strangers who suffer with the same thing and be able to tell them that I had found a cure 11 years ago. Next week I might go rafting with a group that needs 6 people to balance their raft and do the trip. I could do that.

Finally, with regard to how I came to be on the less commonly prescribed, Subutex, I have been told by two different doctors to never take naltrexone again and to add it to my list medications that I am allergic to. My records dating back the last 13 or 14 years all reflect my allergy to naltrexone right along with several other medications. Actually, my scary Skype doctor who seems to know absolutely nothing about Suboxone, didn't even question it and just prescribed it but had she looked into it, she would have seen that I didn't just come up with this yesterday because I want to be on Subutex instead of Suboxone.

I could tell you about all three of my horrifying experiences with naltrexone but am, afterall, working on the art of brevity. It's also not easy to talk about any of them as they were all very traumatic experiences. I have read in my online research that an estimated 15% of people are allergic to naltrexone. Not sure if this is true but I did see that several times recently.

Just wanted to add that I appreciate your support and that of Razor55. I am skating on very thin ice and am at another crucial fork in deciding whether to stay on this or not. This battle has been the driving force behind my last two relapses after detoxing with Subutex. I was so afraid to stay on the Subutex and was so afraid I already was that I got back on heroin to avoid just the fear of Subutex withdrawal!

Today marks day 12 on Subutex and I need to jump soon or stay on it. I am still struggling with the decision and could relapse again if I go off it and try exercising in order to give myself more time to think about it.

I have been exercising as much as I can over the last 12 days because I do still wonder if vigorous exercise could be enough. I've been jumping on my treadmill if I start to feel the slightest bit antsy and walking my dog every single morning. Rule 62 says that exercise quite possibly could be enough but why suffer? I fully recognize that I could die trying but still want to exhaust every single possibility. I know how risky it is. As they say in AA, 'Just for today' (and since I see my Sub doctor tomorrow morning and they UA me to check my levels) I will stay on Subutex and not risk relapse.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2015 1:32 pm 
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Yes, a big fan of Mel Brooks and all his movies. My wife remembers all the actors for almost every movie made and I remember only quotes. It's only funny if others recognize the quote though. They've gotten me in trouble at work when I used a few teaching a defensive driving course.

I probably shouldn't have mentioned the other site because they are the competition. It's been ages since I've popped in there and it's my belief the site is run by Reckitt Benckiser, although it is only a guess.

You seem to know what's best for you so I have no argument about using morphine instead of buprenorphine so you feel your best. This site is for those who chose ORT of any kind to stay away from addictive behaviors. But mostly we talk about Suboxone/Buprenorphine. We had a few on methadone but haven't heard from them in quite some time. People come and go through the years. I just happen to be one who has stayed. And also being a moderator keeps me logging in.

Let us know how it turns out.

rule

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2015 3:24 pm 
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I don't know what is best for me for certain. I have been wrestling with the decision to stay on or stay off of buprenophine for months. As a physician, what would happen if you were to prescribe morphine instead of Subutex for ORT? I will let you know what my PCP does or says about the idea. I am just so shocked to see morphine right along with Suboxone, Subutex, buprenorphine and methadone on the Wikipedia page for Opiate Replacement Therapy (ORT.) I was hoping to gain your insight (Rule 62) about the idea of morphine in the U.S. I would be very skeptical of the idea right off the bat but it just so happens that this worked for me for 8 years and is being used as ORT in other countries. I am quite serious and think of morphine in response to you having said something along the lines of, 'until something better comes along.' Could morphine possibly be that 'something?' If so, how could it become an accepted form of ORT in America? What would it take?


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2015 3:34 pm 
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HELLO ABBY!!! I too am a big Mel Brooks fan, caught the similarity as soon as I seen your name lol! I guess I don't really have much to add here. I am new to recovery, been on suboxone about 7 weeks, and clean for the last 29 days. As for your views on AA/NA, I couldn't agree more. It's great that they are there for those who need that sort of thing, and I wont say anything bad about them. But I have a hard time going to those meetings. I was judged almost immediately when others found out I was on suboxone. That's their hang-up, though, and I just continue with MY fight. They can keep their key chains, as far as I'm concerned. Also, I was way bad off on morphine myself for about 7 years, abusing it to an almost unreal extent. It is truly amazing that u managed to NOT abuse it yourself. The fact that it was YOU that wanted and DID taper yourself down just further proves that. GOOD FOR YOU!!! Again, amazing! That's all, just wanted to welcome you and say keep it up. Whatever your choice of replacement therapy is, as long as its something you and your Dr. agree on, is definitely better than the alternative!

nice to meet you,
Jason


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2015 7:03 pm 
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Hi Jason.

Thanks for your reply. I think you hit on something in acknowledging the importance of truly choosing to stop abusing a substance vs. being forced to. Addiction is so personal in so many ways.

With the assistance of an opiate to control the cravings, an addict is really being given a fighting chance to do what their minds know is right. Experiencing withdrawal is the biggest trigger of all! It nearly ensures a relapse in my experience. Take that major impediment to stopping out of the equation and the odds of success increase without a doubt.

I just want the ORT to be morphine. I know I can manage it and I know I can get off of it. I know it has been around for way too long for anyone to still be wondering if it rots your teeth over time, for example or all that could possibly happen long term. Morphine is a well understood drug where buprenorphine is not so much so.

If my doctor were offering me morphine instead, I would not be conflicted at all over a decision that could easily mean the difference between life or death.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2015 7:09 pm 
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I imagine you are already aware that it is illegal to prescribe morphine as ORT or to taper it to treat an addiction. One of the reasons buprenorphine is used instead is because of its ceiling effect...more doesn't cause you to OD...it doesn't cause euphoria, etc. I'm actually on it to get off 11 years of morphine.
Thanks,
Morphing


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2015 10:03 pm 
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Hi Morphing. No, I did not know that was the law but that is exactly what I wanted to know so thank you for that answer. My PCP did promise to 'help' if/when I go off it. It's good to know that is at least an option in the Sub detox arena. ~Abby


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Fond Du Lac Psychiatry
Dr. Jeffrey Junig, M.D., Ph.D.

  • Board Certified Psychiatrist
  • Asst Clinical Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin

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