It is currently Fri Nov 24, 2017 1:08 pm



All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Our Sponsors





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2016 8:58 pm 
Offline
Average Poster
Average Poster

Joined: Sun May 01, 2016 10:37 pm
Posts: 4
I am a woman, 22 years old and have been on Suboxone for almost 4 years. Since around the time I have started suboxone I have had undeniable urges to pick and chew at my skin (mostly my hands), and also pulling at my hair.
I faintly remember reading somewhere that Suboxone and dermatillamania are linked but not researched. Dermatillamania is more common in women, also. So, is anyone here experiencing this? I have never had these tendencies before Suboxone. When I start picking at my hands and face it is SO HARD to stop. I get so angry sometime because I can't stop but I really really want to. It can take up to three hours of continuous picking.
I haven't yet found what triggers me to do it. For most people, it's stressed induced butI can't relate to that. All I can say is that it will randomly pop-up in my head and I want to do it. I have it more on a leash now by keeping myself really busy, it was way worse before though. The tips of my fingers would be raw and bleeding and my face made me look like a tweaker. Husband hated it so much but I am doing better now. I have scars that will never go away on my face.
Anyways, just putting all my details out there in case anyone can relate. My life got way better with Suboxone and I really can't think of anything else that would cause me to start doing this.
Thank you for your time and replies!
-BexyRae


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2016 10:18 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2008 11:03 pm
Posts: 1553
I don't know of a connection in the literature. I could hypothesize something-- that since picking behaviors tend to happen when a person isn't occupied, that maybe picking behaviors are suppressed by active addiction, when we are so busy chasing after something.... and it got worse as you lost the need to chase after using. Just guessing though.

I also note that self-injurious behaviors, mainly cutting, are reduced by naltrexone...

Maybe someone else knows of a connection? The usual treatment for picking or hair-pulling (trichotillomania) is to treat anxiety with an SSRI. Therapists treat the behavior by having the person wear mittens, or put band-aids, over the fingers when watching TV or just hanging around the house.

That's all I got!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2016 10:47 pm 
Offline
Average Poster
Average Poster

Joined: Sun May 01, 2016 10:37 pm
Posts: 4
I believe I read this on Wikipedia. Searching dermatillamania (spelling?) I remember it said something to the effect of : dermatillamania has been connected with suboxone patients but no studies have been made.
I remember that because I was really struck by it. It really made sense to me. I am more of a skin picker than hair puller. People often call skin picking trichotillomania when it's dermotillomania. They are very similar and often go hand-in-hand.
Just to make it clear, it is not something I do to inflict pain on myself. Because I used to inflict pain on myself on purpose (early teens) and this is very different in nature. I would almost call it OCD because I like getting rid of dead skin and blackheads, but it goes way too far and I look worse than when I started.
I hear what you're saying, but my addiction wasn't like "always trying to find the drug". It was very brief after a loss in my life. Dermatillomania could be from anything, but I think Suboxone may have something to do with it. It would be interesting to see if anyone else is experiencing this. I've delt with a lot of anti-depressants and almost ALL had major negative effects. So maybe it's just the way my brain reacts to it.


Top
 Profile  
 
Our Sponsors
PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2016 12:08 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 4:42 am
Posts: 4265
I just used my university's library to see if there is any research on buprenorphine and dermatillomania and came up completely empty. I couldn't find any hints of that kind of research going on. The statement below was as close I a came to an explanation:

"Many studies indicate that pathological skin picking is a heterogeneous condition, and it is possible to differentiate at least two styles of picking: the focused style involves picking with full awareness often in response to an urge or negative effect, whereas the automatic style occurs beyond one's awareness, often in sedentary situations. Pathological skin picking is associated with psychosocial impairments, social isolation, distress, and high levels of anxiety and depression, and it often leads to serious medical complications, i.e. recurrent infections. Pathological skin picking is a chronic disorder with a high rate of psychiatric comorbidity. Individuals with skin picking disorder have a high incidence of anxiety disorders, mood disorders, body dysmorphic disorder and impulse control disorders."

It could be that what you saw was someone else wondering the same thing about correlation?

Amy

_________________
Done is better than perfect!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2016 10:56 am 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member

Joined: Sun Feb 14, 2016 9:40 pm
Posts: 658
Hey bexxyrae,

When I read thru dermatillomania on Wikipedia, it did not mention buprenorphrine, suboxone or any brand name of bup. It did say dermatillomania is associated w 'substance abuse disorder' and I'm wondering if that read to you as 'suboxone' instead and that's why you think its in Wiki. But its not. Wiki does state naloxone might be of help but no studies corroborate.

_________________
Did well on Suboxone. Stopped May 2011.
Stopping went well -- its the staying stopped -- where the real work begins.
Coming here 'keeps recovery green'.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2016 11:53 am 
Offline
Power Poster
Power Poster

Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2016 2:37 pm
Posts: 45
I know this post is rather old, but for what it's worth, I have this same issue, but with nail biting and skin picking instead of hair pulling. It was more severe when I first started on Suboxone, during the same period where you actually feel slightly "high" (some do, some don't). After a few weeks, 99% of the symptoms went away. I never in my life bit my nails as a nervous habit, so waking up with sore nail-beds because I bit them non-stop the day before was quite unpleasant, but as I already stated, the symptoms went away in a few weeks.

Are you still having these symptoms?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2016 3:12 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 4:42 am
Posts: 4265
This is an interesting topic to me because I have always struggled against picking my skin since I was a little kid. I think that skin picking is mostly a maladaptive behavior to release nervous energy and calm myself.

I've tried to focus on when I am tempted to pick. It is usually at night when I'm a little bit wound up. Some medications seem to make me feel a little more wound up and I've noticed I've tended to pick more when on one of them. (Buprenorphine is not one of them.) Therefore, I pick more. I firmly believe that I do not pick skin because of a medication. I pick skin as a way of coping when I am nervous or unhappy. I have found that certain medications exacerbate those feelings and so I use the behavior to deal with the feelings.

Amy

_________________
Done is better than perfect!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2016 6:54 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2012 5:04 pm
Posts: 442
The information regarding Suboxone and Dematillomania is on the website called Factmed.com
See below:

Study of possible correlation between DERMATILLOMANIA and SUBOXONE
Accompanying discussion about FactMed users Questions and Concerns

About this FactMed analysis covering adverse side effect reports of SUBOXONE patients who developed DERMATILLOMANIA.
FactMed provides MD-approved analysis to help both patients, researchers, and physicians accurately assess the risk profile for more than 20,000 different pharmaceutical products. The below report offers compiled information from Food & Drug Administration and FactMed user submissions. Between January 2004 and October 2012, 14 individuals taking SUBOXONE reported DERMATILLOMANIA to the FDA. A total of 7899 SUBOXONE drug adverse event reaction reports were made with the FDA during this time period. Often the FDA only receives reports of the most critical and severe cases; these numbers may therefore underrepresent the complication rate of the medication.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2016 12:39 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 4:42 am
Posts: 4265
I would be interested in seeing how many people taking oxycodone and other opioids reported the same thing. Because one of the medications that seemed to make me feel like picking was oxy.

Amy

_________________
Done is better than perfect!


Top
 Profile  
 
   
PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2016 11:16 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2014 7:15 pm
Posts: 2473
Location: Tennessee
I think methamphetamine makes ppl pick their skin really bad. One of the classic signs when seeing someone u think is on meth is the sores all over them where they pick at themselves like crazy. I heard once from someone that the reason they do that is because their skin feels creepy crawly, but I don't know for sure. I did it a handful of times and only remember the need to chew on the inside of my lip.....it was absolutely horrible! Anyway lol I got off track but it's pretty common for meth users to be the king of skin pickers.

_________________
Jennifer


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2016 1:17 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2008 11:03 pm
Posts: 1553
Please, please, please.... the factmed stuff is not an 'analysis', other than the website scanning the FDA database. The other day I read an article about 'fake news'-- a topic the worries me, as it allows some 'news' to be dismissed if it is not convenient or in line with another's politics-- but the point was made in that article that people tend to believe things if they are accompanied by graphs, jargon, statistics, etc. The comments about 'factmed' are a perfect example-- a bunch of nonspecific jargon that gets attached to the word 'suboxone', 'dermatillomania', 'analysis', etc. Someone reads that paragraph, and ends up thinking that someone actually looked at dermatillomania and buprenorphine to see if they are connected. That makes the person think that they MUST be connected, because someone actually looked into it.

But it is all nonsense. The only person who investigated it is the person who types 'suboxone' and 'dermatillomania' on the web site. Even the word 'factcheck' is misleading, as it is not checking 'facts'-- it is pairing words together that may or may not be related.

This is a big country, and millions of scripts have been written for buprenorphine products. That dermatillomania was entered into the FDA database 14 times over a dozen year tells me there is no connection. In my psych practice I've seen about 10 people over the last 10 years who had trichotillomania. Some were on buprenorphine, but they all had the condition in their early teens, long before starting buprenorphine and in most cases before their addiction to opioids.

I commented yesterday on a post about alopecia, about how often stigma leads to false assumptions about medications-- and this is another great example.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2016 7:16 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member

Joined: Sat Oct 29, 2016 9:34 pm
Posts: 614
Correlation is not causation. Out of the many hundred eds thousands of people (i"m guessing) now taking bupe, some of them are likely to be hair pullers. "Some" meaning a tiny fraction.

I'm also guessing the symptom arose as a consequence of sobriety rather than bupe, which is stressful for an addict in the beginning especially, in so many ways.


Last edited by godfrey on Thu Dec 01, 2016 8:29 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 01, 2016 1:53 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2011 12:35 am
Posts: 2840
Location: Southwest
Also keep in mind that Buprenorphine is one weird drug. My first two weeks were just plain crazy feeling until my body adjusted. So it's possible all sorts of funny things can happen to you. It's not the medication, rather a reaction to the induction. The very first night I swore I could have stopped any habit of any kind including eating! Well, not quite that far but it did make me feel like no substance could ever take control over my life again. 2 weeks later and I'm back to normal.

Most all the previous posters stated it (?) was short lived which tells me it's not the Suboxone. Interesting subject though. Many people like Amy, me, most of my family, all have little nervous habits. Very common for thinking humans.

_________________
Don't take yourself so damn seriously


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Our Sponsors
Suboxone Forum latest topics RSS feed Subscribe to the entire forum
 

 

 
Fond Du Lac Psychiatry
Dr. Jeffrey Junig, M.D., Ph.D.

  • Board Certified Psychiatrist
  • Asst Clinical Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group