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PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2010 5:33 pm 
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My best friend, who is also on suboxone called my phone at 5am last night, which I thought was unusual. The only reason why I answered was because he never calls me that late, or at least hasn't called me that late since we were using. Anyways, I answered and the first thing he said was we are so lucky to have found sub and he later explained his old roommate was found dead in his parents bathroom last night from an IV heroin OD.

His parents found him in the bathroom the following morning. Me and my friend, who were at each others throats toward the end of our opiate addictions feel very fortunate to escape that old life. I actually came very close to buying a ten pack of syringes at a local Walgreens toward the end, but didn't only because I didn't want to mess up my high due to lack of experience from cooking dope; at least I thought that was the only reason why I stuck to what I did best, which was snorting. The only reason why I mention the IV heroin use is because me and my friend are the only ones who responded to suboxone long term out of the people we knew, and it is because we never tried injecting it. The other people we know who ended up to become IV users resent suboxone for never working for them, but they still get their scripts every month to sell on the streets for money to buy more heroin.

It may be a coincidence though because I know their has to be IV users who have succeeded on sub. The guy who died last night never tried suboxone from what I heard and was actually clean for a long time from what my friend told me. He was taking adderall from what I understand, which is an amphetamine. I don't know why anyone would want to treat opioid addiction with adderall but I guess some people think suboxone is dirty. This guy only replaced twice in his whole opioid career. The last time he relapsed he got to the hospital on time and this time he didn't. He was very full of life from what I was told. So, I just wanted to say I was very thankful to have my sub this morning and I thought I should mention this to you guys, because it could be a lot worst if you think it sucks to be on sub, which I think is a drag myself lately approaching my 3 year anniversary this july.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2010 11:49 pm 
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I am sorry for the loss of your friend......this truly is a deadly disease. I also attend AA as part of my recovery and I am surprised at the number of deaths this past year of people I know that are trying to get sober. We truly are blessed to have found this drug. It has changed my life for the better including helping me with depression. I know everyone has this or that to say about suboxone. The people that love me support my use of suboxone for all others I choose not to share with them. It is not that I am embarrassed or feel less of a person because I take it I only share with those that love me and those that struggle with opiates.......helping others.... helps me. This site gives me comfort and I love it when someone new comes along so I can give them some knowledge that I have learned from all of you. Congrats on 3 years......you know that person that died could be any one of us. Thank GOD we have found each other and suboxone. Best of luck........


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2010 4:50 pm 
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I forgot to mention. This guy died the night before his birthday, which is on valentines day. I actually only met him once, but he was a really good guy. He even adopted a 13 year old dog that was half blind and deaf because the dog was going to be euthanized. He took the dog home with him and it lived an extra 3 years.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2010 6:13 pm 
I'm sorry about what happened to your friend MikeT. It always makes so sad to hear about such things.
Here where I live, there is a case all over the news about a local relatively high-profile sports figure who is an opiate addict. He had been under investigation for about a year for doctor shopping and illegally obtaining pain medications. He had been to rehab at least once and was reportedly cooperating with officials initially with drug testing, etc. then went off the radar for a few weeks. He was arrested while picking up via FedEx (or similar entity) some drugs to help with withdrawal (sleeping pills, benzos, adderall) He was taken to jail, reportedly in horrific opiate withdrawal and subsequently transferred to a rehab facility. This guy is kind of a home town former sports hero, from a well-known family (consequently dad is an addict/alcoholic as well). They had wealth, status in the community, etc. etc. All the resources money can buy. My question......why is he not on Suboxone? Was he ever on Suboxone? What led to the relapse? Why, with all that is at stake, did he go down this road again? To have his mug shot (pitiful face) all over the newspapers and tv....to subject his wife and kids to this.....on and on with the questions that have no answers.
It's so sad....heartbreaking. This disease is consuming! It knows no boundaries. It doesn't matter who you are. I hate that because of our addiction, we are led to do illegal things....we become criminals.....go to jail or face other losses of freedom or privilege, instead of getting the help we so desparately need. Instead of getting treated as an ill person who is taking desparate measures to not feel sick, we are treated as the criminals that our disease led us to become.
Granted, there are things we do in active addiction that are so criminal that there is no getting around the fact that severe consequences are in order. However, much of the time we are hurting no one but ourselves. I know there are "drug courts" and other alternatives in place in many states which are making efforts to somewhat decriminalize drug-related offenses, but to my knowledge they all involve mandatory 12 step, abstinence-based recovery, which we all know has very low success rates.
I'm not politically savvy; I'm not a lawyer or a doctor or any kind of expert on any of this stuff. I'm just an opiate addict who's found my best chance at recovery through Suboxone. So yeah, MikeT, we are lucky to have our Suboxone! And we have to do our best to get the word out, so that people like your friend might not die.
If anyone had ever, ever told me before this happened to me, how unbelievably easy it was to get addicted to opiates and how even more unbelievably hard it is to recover.....I would have never believed it! This disease is so complex.....always waiting to kick back in and take over again.....or worse yet, kill us.


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Fond Du Lac Psychiatry
Dr. Jeffrey Junig, M.D., Ph.D.

  • Board Certified Psychiatrist
  • Asst Clinical Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin

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