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PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2016 6:00 pm 
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I've waited a long time to post this but I can honestly say it is possible to stop suboxone with practically No withdraws. I took subs for 7 years, lost everything I had, twice! I honestly didn't care anymore, had no energy, no drive, goals, ambition, motivation...sound familiar? Finally, I'd had enough of being on the suboxone train and was ready to get off. After looking at a few forums and reading all the negative posts about how impossible it was to get off subs I decided to quit thinking about it and just do it. I was taking at least 8 to 16 mg a day for years! Quickly went from what the doc said I "needed" to 2 mg a day for a few weeks. Dropped to 1mg no problem. Stayed a 1mg for a few months until I decided to go to .50 of a mg. stayed there for a few months and finally made the jump from .50 to .25 of a mg (1/32 of an 8 mg strip) I took .25 of a mg for months, making up my mind to make the jump was the hardest part but I did it! I Finally did it!!!! The first few nights were tiresome just bc I was expecting withdraws to hit me at any time, but they never did. I get a full 8 hours sleep and wake up feeling great every morning. I write this in hopes to help someone else who is going through the same Torture I went through for years. You don't have to keep living in fear, with Gods help you Can quit!

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2016 10:43 pm 
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Well congrats Leavens,
Its nice to hear a positive jump story . The internet is full of bad ones. Most of the time a person more or less jumps way to soon.
Your account proves ,to me anyway , that tapering just takes time. More often than not it is the addict /patient who must make the choise to start.
We had a women in our support group last month jump from 10mgs. Lasted 8 days till she checked into a detox for 10 more days. I saw her at 3 weeks out and she was doing fine heading into a recovery meeting. So it is possible it all depends on you.
Thanks for shairing..


Razor


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2016 11:13 pm 
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Thanks Razor! That is very true, I think a lot of people get in a rush and jump too soon, I know I did several times and would get discouraged. Slowly and consistently seemed to be the way for me. Everyone is different, but it's all up to the person whether they really want to quit or not. 7 years was enough for me and I can honestly say I've never felt better! Thanks again Razor!

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2016 11:32 pm 
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Leavens,

I appreciate that you've stopped buprenorphine. I'll share another story.

'Matt' was 22 when he started in my practice. He was using oxycodone daily-- about 6 of the 30-mg tabs per day, spending a little over $150 per day but making some money by selling some of the pills he bought from the guy who had a script for them. He did well on Suboxone, but he told his mom and dad that he 'kicked the pain pills' on his own. He worried they would find out and think less of him. He lived at home, so he had to hide his meds and wrappers from them, which was a hassle.

Over a year and a half he started resenting Suboxone. He forgot all those days when he used to get sick and hide in his bedroom, telling his parents he had another flu bug. He felt OK physically, but he got more and more obsessed with getting off Suboxone. I tried to explain to him that it is justs another medication, similar to the medications people take for asthma, or migraines, or hypertension. He never was very good at meeting people because he was using drugs during the period when most people develop social interests and hobbies. But he started blaming his own problems on Suboxone. I tried explaining to him that EVERYONE feels tired as they get older, but exercise will provide more energy. But it was easier to avoid exercise, and say that 'Suboxone made him lazy, or 'Suboxone took away his motivation.'

His parents discovered he was taking Suboxone, the med that they heard about in the news. They were angry, and called my office to say they wanted him off 'that medicine'. With his permission I spoke with them, and told them about the chronic nature of opioid dependence. 'That's not our son!' they said. 'He doesn't need it, and we want him OFF.' Matt joined them in condemning Suboxone. 'I stayed on it way too long', he said. 'I should have stopped it after one month-- then I wouldn't be stuck on it now!'

I explained, as I always do, that he can easily go back to taking 180 mg of oxycodone per day. It would be an easy transition from Suboxone; no withdrawal, no problems-- just change over, and then 'remake' that decision. He said he COULD have done it back then, two years ago-- but now he is stuck on Suboxone.

His parents sent him off to treatment for 90 days, and that was the last I saw of him in my practice. I heard through the grapevine, a few months after he got back, that he was going well. I never saw him at AA meetings, but maybe he was going somewhere else.

I forgot about him for the next year or so, as I forgot about the other 10-15 patients who dropped out of buprenorphine treatment that year. I gave his space away to the next person on the list.

About two years later I read his obituary. I got the story from his friends; he started using a few months earlier, but this time he was using IV heroin instead of pain pills (which is pretty common). His mom came home from grocery shopping one afternoon and went to his bedroom when she called and he didn't answer. He was gray. his eyes open, a needle and tournequet on the floor. She tried CPR but he was already pretty stiff. His bladder emptied at some point when his brain stopped getting oxygen, so he was in a puddle of piss on the bed.

I've read 7-8 obituaries of former patients-- people who were urged to stop medications and be 'truly' clean. I have pictures of most of those people from when they doing well.

None of those parents contacted me, which is understandable. I'm glad that they don't, to be honest, because they basically killed their own kid out of ignornace, rather than spend some time to learn how the med works... and I have a lot of anger toward them. I DO spend time with other parents-- with the parents who tried their hardest to make Suboxone work for their sons or daughters, who eventually lost their kids to addiction. At least those parents TRIED to do the right thing.

I wish you luck, Leavens-- but your challengs have barely even begun. It is difficult to always feel happy, confident, and self assured. When we least expect it, life throws something unexpected our way. A GF breaks up. OR a sibling starts a fight. Or the car doesn't start and the jerk employer fires the person for being late. I hope you never go back to the bad days. They make all the crap about buprenorphine look like a great deal.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 21, 2016 12:16 am 
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Thanks for the post, I think..? And Thanks for sharing your story and I'm sorry to hear about that. Do I think that I will always be confident, happy, and self assured on a daily basis? Of course not, that's just life. I know there will be bad days and I will take them, along with the good! My grandad once said "life's hard enough without a monkey on your back" in other words life's tough in general, don't make it even harder by letting an addiction weigh you down. I can go out now with my head held high knowing I beat my addiction and that I will never go back to that life. Maybe for some staying on suboxone is what they need, but I wanted to know what it felt like to wake up and not even think about needing a pill to get the day started. I've always struggled with depression, anxiety etc. and had several doctors recommend that I take something for it, but I wanted to learn how to deal with my problems, like people should do, instead of depend on a pill to make me feel "normal". There are Way too many different medications out there and doctors pushing them when they have no idea what the effects of that medication may be. Best of luck to you with your practice and thanks again for sharing.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 21, 2016 11:27 am 
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Leavens,
I do hope you have recovery plans in order though. The story that Dr J has told is the norm most of the time not the exception.
Ive seen this happen myself where I volunteer at clinic.

Just be careful and I do hope you have many things going in the right direction for your future. As we say here, its not the stopping, its the staying stopped. If opiate s or cravings return, and they often do, you know sub treatment is there.

Good luck.

Razor


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 21, 2016 11:41 pm 
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Thanks :)

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 27, 2016 12:11 am 
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Congrats Leavens!!!

Very happy for u, I can't wait to be there....I have a long ways to go as I just started 9/8/16. But I'll get there.
Hope u still stay linked in here, sounds like we will ALWAYS need the support of others in our shoes.

Thank u for sharing ur positive experience with us. I wish u nothing but the best in ur new narcotic free life! ☆☆☆☆☆


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2016 1:41 am 
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Thank you AB! It's always good to know my experience can help someone else in a positive way! I haven't been on in months and just noticed your post, but I am going to try to check in more often. How are things going for you? I'm just a few more days away from being 6 months off with no relapses! I hope all is well and hope to hear back from you! God bless!

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