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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2012 5:59 pm 
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I don't know if I can make it with amount of pain I am having through this entire taper. Started at 12 mg. each and every taper has created extreme suffering. Been dong this since June. Haven't slept maybe 4 hours a day if lucky. Tired, and look like I am a meth addict. I have most of the symptoms of w/d, do you all go through these horrible w/d symptoms. Doesn't matter how little I cut out. Too big, whole other story. Each taper makes me suffer w/d.

I found a rapid detox. In and out in 4 days. Opiate free and they follow up next 30-60 by phone. They can call in any meds that are required. It is in Michigan. 7500.00 room, transportation from airport, and procedure. No bs like the other centers create. They have great ratings and 80% success rate. You do have to take someone there to stay with you.

If I had found this possible, I would have never tapered and just went. So upset with myself, but while tapering my mind doesn't work as well as it did. Glad I read about all this so I easily understood what was going on. And just ride it all out.

I am so unhappy, I did this procedure priorly, they put me on suboxone. Never told me it was just a different opiate. Or, that I would have to pay the piper again just to get on my Pain pump that gives me Prialt a non narcotic. It has given me back my life, but I then had to contend with the suboxone. They should have told me what they were doing to me. Had such a bad experience. Then they told me for 20,000 they would take me off the suboxone. Nice huh. Sob.

Sorry get myself blue. Anyone else do this? Curious if this is more or less harmful than tapering and doing these must painful w/d's? Please let me know your thoughts....


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2012 2:28 am 
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hey, brit
sorry your having such a difficult time right now, that sucks,,,,,,

Here's an older thread on this subject, you might want to read thru.
i didnt have time to read thru the whole thing again,,,,,, but I know there IS good info in there
http://suboxforum.com/viewtopic.php?p=49674


I've only heard of one sucessful rapid detox, with bupe, or from bupe, and the guy posted In this very thread above, that I gave you the link too.
And I cannot explain it like TeeJay does, did, but for some reason, it doesn't always work becuz of the half life of subs.
a few people have come on and posted horrible experiences.


http://suboxforum.com/viewtopic.php?p=57071
HERE is the one I was thinking OF!!!!!!!!!!!!!
BUt, the SAME ONE GUY, posted here too,that says everything was just great. . . . Makes me wonder if he was a salesman or something, or being paid to advertise for the company????

WHO KNOWS...................
read the threads, they do a MUCH better job of explaining things than I DO

Also heres a WELL WRITTEN article,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
I will post the LINK at the bottom
6 Things You Should Know About Rapid Detox

10/03/2012 By Eliza Player


Rapid opiate detoxification clinics speckle the Internet, selling the buyer a “painless detox from opiates,” making wild claims that the addict will “be back to normal in a matter of days!” This ever-popular treatment for opiate dependence claims to have the “magic pill” that can end your nightmare of addiction virtually overnight. As a recovering opiate addict, I am well aware of the work that goes into recovery long after the detoxification process has finished. And as a wary consumer, I am always leery of the “magic pill” that seems too good to be true. In my experience, when something is too good to be true, it usually is not. Long-term recovery from opiate addiction takes a lot of effort and hard work, and there is no “magic pill,” to date, anyway.

Rapid opiate detoxification has steadily grown in popularity, as more and more people search for this quick fix. As an addict, we become accustomed to the quick fix, hardly realizing there really is no quick fix for addiction. Rapid opiate detoxification shows no concrete evidence to be any more effective at treating opiate addiction than other methods, and some would even argue it is less effective. To further complicate matters, this method can be dangerous to certain patients, not to mention that it is incredibly hard on the addict’s already worn body.

Like many of us, I Googled rapid opiate detoxification when I first raised questions about this method. Interestingly enough, the first twenty sources of information on Google came directly from these opiate detoxification providers, which led me to dig a little further. Thankfully, my journalism training has taught me to always look at your source to determine how reliable the information is. The clinics that provide rapid detox are going to be supportive of this treatment, and they will be willing to leave out some important details in order to gain your business. Rapid opiate detoxification is a business, and a big business at that! The primary goal of these clinics’ web presence is to attract customers.

These rapid opiate detoxification centers rave about the success of this method, and their “success” is backed up with a number of personal testaments. But, alas, there really are no statistics, or facts used to back up any of these wild claims. Upon digging a little deeper, I found that most of the studies related to rapid opiate detoxification only tracked these patients for 6 months following the procedure to determine the success of their program. If you ask me, the first two years of my recovery were the hardest, the period where I was most vulnerable, and I would argue that following these patients for a mere six months is not a very good indication of long-term success.

Rapid opiate detoxification is a medically supervised detox, where they accelerate the detoxification process by intravenously pumping the body with naltrexone, which is an opiate agonist. This drug works to rapidly dispel all the opiates from their receptors in your brain, thus cramming the detoxification period into a matter of hours. The quicker that the opiates are removed from one’s brain, the more intense the withdrawal symptoms will be. As a result, rapid detoxification is done while the patient is asleep, under heavy anesthesia.

These rapid opiate detoxification websites offer a quick and painless withdrawal, a sort of “magic pill,” if you may. Having been opiate-free for five years, I do not believe there is any “magic pill” to deal with addiction. Recovering from an addiction takes a lot more personal soul-searching than simply undergoing a 2-day detoxification period. Most addiction experts will agree that detoxification is just the beginning. I am weary of anyone who is trying to sell a quick fix for any illness, especially when that illness is such a complex issue, like addiction.

After scrolling though five pages on Google, I was inundated with personal stories about the rapid detoxification process. Unlike the testimonies on the rapid detox providers’ websites, these stories were speckled with pain and frustration. Overwhelmingly, these patients described the process as painful and tough. Not one account described their experience with rapid opiate detoxification to be the painless process that these clinics advertise. One patient said that when he awoke from the procedure, he felt the worst withdrawal he had ever experienced. Another patient described waking up from the procedure, vomiting all over. Even another patient described an awful bought of diarrhea, where he actually messed his bed up every hour or so. He describes a sense of utter embarrassment to have a nurse changing his diarrhea stained sheets every hour. Contrary to what these rapid opiate detoxification providers promote, this procedure is not an entirely painless and dignified process.

So, what does one need to know about rapid opiate detoxification before considering undergoing this process? Look past the vast majority of raving product promotions, and consider some of the lesser-known facts about this procedure.



6 Things You Should Know About Rapid Opiate Detoxification

1) Detoxification is only the beginning. Most addiction experts will agree that detoxification is only the beginning of the process of recovery. Although traditional abstinence based recovery is not the only method we have for treating addiction today, it is still the leading method. A traditional treatment center provides much more to the addicted than simply getting them off drugs physically. The treatment process involves counseling, education about addiction and recovery, and often even includes numerous 12-step meetings. During treatment, addicts will learn about the disease of addiction, while being armed with the tools they need to fight this battle.

Furthermore, many treatment centers recommend a longer stay for opiate addicts. A 30-day stay in a treatment facility will often not be enough time for these addicts to gain the tools they need to stay clean. Often times, these clients will just be starting to feel good enough to engage in activities when their time has ended. Possibly, a rapid detoxification before a 30-day inpatient stay at a treatment facility could help these addicts on a short stay. Most addiction professionals will advise opiate addicts to remain in treatment for at least 90 days, and often a year is the recommended length of stay.

2) Dependence vs. Addiction. Dependence and addiction may seem like the same thing to some, but they are actually very different. Dependence is characterized by the user’s physical dependence on the drug. The dependent individual will experience withdrawal symptoms when they are deprived of their drug of choice, or drug of dependence. Addiction, however, is characterized with negative consequences. A person crosses over from dependence to addiction when the drug use is causing negative consequences in his or her life. The addicted will keep using despite these negative consequences.

Addiction is a complex disease that is compounded with a variety of factors. Addiction is different for everyone who experiences it, as factors such as environment, genetics, and mental health can play big roles in the addiction process. To maintain long-term sobriety, addiction professionals agree that some form of psychotherapy gives the best defense against relapse. Addicts must figure out the reasons they use, in order to combat the use. Often times, addicts have other underlying issues that need to be dealt with. These issues can be medical, personal, or spiritual issues. By dealing with the mind, body, and soul, and addict stand a better chance of long-term sobriety. Rapid opiate detoxification only deals with the physical aspect of addiction, thus leaving the addict vulnerable to relapse.

A number of the publications I read about rapid opiate detoxification mentioned that this was a treatment for opiate dependence, but made no mention of opiate addiction. To be fair, rapid opiate detoxification would be a great way to deal with dependence, but not addiction. The dependent person will not experience cravings, and does not feel the desire to go back to using. The dependent person is generally thought to be able to go right back to their life once detoxified, with little or no extra support needed.

But, this treatment is not aimed at just the dependent person. These rapid opiate detoxification providers claim that this process can nearly cure one’s addiction, while making very little mention of aftercare, or other treatment elements, such as therapy. Most of these websites do mention that they “strongly encourage” patients to seek out some kind of therapy, but this therapy is rarely provided by the rapid detox clinic. I did find one rapid opiate detoxification center that offered a short stay at their “sober house,” following the procedure. Of course, the longer the stay, the more the price goes up. Additionally, this “aftercare” is only available for 4 weeks following the rapid opiate detoxification procedure, and a number of addiction professionals would argue that this is just not enough time for an opiate addict to gain all the tools needed for long-term sobriety.

3) Post Acute Withdrawal Syndrome, PAWS. Opiate addiction alters the brain’s chemistry dramatically, and it may take quite some time for the addict’s brain to return to its normal functioning. When opiates are used for a significant period of time, the brain stops making its own natural opiates. Opiates control our motivation, our feeling of well-being, and our tolerance to pain. When the drugs are taken out of the equation, the user will experience an intense withdrawal that lasts about a week. Although rapid opiate detoxification aims to lessen that withdrawal, in both time and severity, it does not manage anything beyond the mere withdrawal.

It can take an addict’s brain much longer than a few hours, or even a few days to return to normal. For some, the process could take weeks or months, while others may even find they are stuck with PAWS for a year or more. It is during this time period that I always ended up relapsing. The addict will feel totally devoid of his energy, as if he is merely dragging his feet along the ground to even walk. The addict will have little to no motivation, and experience a heightened sensitivity to pain. Basically, the opiate addict may feel like complete crap for months following detoxification.

Rapid opiate detoxification makes no mention of Post Acute Withdrawal Syndrome, and it does not attempt to manage these symptoms. While flooding the brain with naltrexone during the detoxification process will help to eliminate the opiates from your system, it does nothing to help the addict’s brain to replenish these natural opiates. Even with rapid opiate detoxification, the symptoms of PAWS will persist, and the addict is left incredibly vulnerable during this crucial period of recovery.

Rapid opiate detoxification clinics do provide their patients with naltrexone to take in the weeks and months following their procedure. While this does not help to eliminate the symptoms of PAWS, it can eliminate cravings and many argue that this ensures that the addict will not use other opiate in this crucial time. Naltrexone works to block the effects of opiates on the brain.

This actually poses a dangerous position for the addict to be in, without the proper therapy and education needed to remain drug free. The naltrexone is given in two forms, pills and a sub dermal patch. A number of the rapid opiate detoxification clinics prefer to use the patch, as it seems to keep these patients on their naltrexone regimen. With the pills, an addict can easily decide to skip his daily naltrexone dose in order to use. This alone poses a serious risk, as the naloxone will make the opiate addict much more sensitive to opiates than before the rapid opiate detoxification procedure. Too often, addicts will use what would have been considered a small amount of opiates before the procedure, but with the naloxone treatment, this “small amount” can cause an overdose. Furthermore, some patients have reported trying to actually cut these patches out of their skin, so they can use again. Others just use right along with the patch. This, too, is dangerous. The naltrexone blocks the effects of the opiates, but it does not stop them from working. An addict who attempts to use while on naltrexone can easily consume lethal doses, without feeling high before they overdose. Simply using naltrexone after the rapid opiate detoxification procedure does not help to prevent PAWS, and could be more dangerous than not using it.

4) A large number of opiate addicts are not good candidates for rapid opiate detoxification. There are several contradictions to rapid opiate detoxification, in which these people will not be allowed to participate. Rapid opiate detoxification is incredibly rough on the body. Just imagine compacting all the pain for a weeklong kick into a matter of hours. The pain is not lessened, and instead is intensified, over a shorter period of time. It is so painful that the patient is put to sleep, but your body still goes through an incredibly traumatic event.

Some health conditions make it impossible to withstand rapid opiate detoxification without serious complications. If the candidate is pregnant, she will have to wait until after having the baby to consider this treatment. Although, I must admit that I called a number of these rapid detox clinics, asking questions about these health issues, and one clinic even said they would perform the procedure on a pregnant woman. The others stated, “Definitely not.” Patients who have had heart problems are also not candidates for the procedure, as the procedure is likely to cause hypertension and irregular heart rhythms. To complicate this matter further, some intravenous addicts have significant damage to their heart that they may not even know about. Renal issues and liver issues can also exclude someone from this procedure. Finally, a patient with a history of mental illness is not eligible for rapid opiate detoxification. With the number of dual diagnosis patients admitted to treatment, I think this would rule out a significant portion of the opiate addicted population. To make this criteria even more difficult, a number of opiate addicts are simply self-medicating and do not even realize they have these underlying mental issues. Some addicts discover their mental illness while in treatment, which could cause some issues with rapid opiate detoxification. Furthermore, a number of addicts are in poor health due to their addiction and they may not even be aware of some of these problems. Unreported or unknown medical issues can cause some serious complications with rapid opiate detoxification, some of which have led to death.

There are a number of other factors that will not exclude the patient from rapid opiate detoxification, but these issues make these patients “unsuitable” candidates. Some of these clinics will still take these patients, depending on the situation, but it just seems risky to me, especially considering that these issues are ones that are often shared among the addict population. Additionally, rapid opiate detoxification is done intravenously, and some opiate addicts hardly have any good veins left, especially not solid enough to be pumping in a massive amount of drugs while the ill-veined patient undergoes a withdrawal experience that is traumatic and difficult on the body.

Chronic pain patients are generally not good candidates for rapid opiate detoxification. These patients often need these opiates to function, so kicking them out of their system could cause more pain. Chronic pain patients are generally advised to attend treatment centers that specialize in these patients. Dealing with addiction and chronic pain becomes a balance of managing their medications. Patients with dependence on alcohol, benzodiazepines, or stimulants are also not recommended for rapid opiate detox. These substances not only create medical complications, but these patients obviously need more intense treatment. More importantly, to rule out any addicts who are poly-substance users makes the qualified candidate pool rather small. Patients with a history of depression are also not suitable candidates. From my experience, there are a large number of opiate addicts who have some history with depression. Finally, those clients who have unstable social circumstances are not advised to use rapid opiate detoxification before they have stabilized their home life. An unstable social circumstance? Isn’t that where all of our lives end up when we are immersed in active addiction?

5) Poses more serious dangers compared to any other detoxification method. There have been more deaths associated with rapid opiate detoxification than any other method of detoxification. Heavy anesthesia alone can cause problems, even death, not to mention the toll that the procedure takes on the addict’s body. One thing that these rapid detoxification providers fail to mention before the procedure is that diarrhea is a very common side effect. Some patients claim to have messed up their bed every hour from this uncontrollable diarrhea. A gastric ulcer, caused from extreme stress, can result from this procedure. Psychiatric complications are not uncommon, and reactions to the variety of drugs pumped intravenously are just as common. Cardiovascular complications have taken more than one life following this procedure. Rapid opiate detoxification can cause high blood pressure and irregular heartbeat. Many candidates may not realize they have heart issues, until they are exacerbated by the procedure. Finally, rapid opiate detoxification can also cause kidney failure and sepsis, both of which can be fatal conditions.

The most common reasons for patient death following rapid opiate detoxification are pulmonary edema, brain hemorrhaging from extremely elevated blood pressure, and choking on their own vomit. The procedure does make the patient vomit, as it is often a symptom of withdrawal. Rapid opiate detoxification is done while you are “asleep” under sedation, making the chance of aspiration very high.

6) Very expensive. This procedure is not covered by health insurance, mostly because it is not a proven therapy. Health insurance companies are leery of the controversial rapid opiate detoxification, stating it is not usually covered because it is not proven to be safe. Prices may range anywhere from $4,000 to $40,000, depending on the services rendered. The most expensive rapid opiate detoxification prices reflect a 4-week stay at an adjoined sober-living facility. Furthermore, a number of patients who opted for the cheaper treatments claim that the rapid detox clinic added a number of charges during the procedure, such as doctor checks at a nurse’s request. To make financial matters even more strenuous, higher risk patients are generally charged more. The cost of methadone is close to the lowest price of rapid opiate detox, for the entire year! The cost of a 90-day treatment center can even be cheaper than a two-week stay at one of the top rapid detoxification clinics! And both of these methods have more proven success.

On another note, I called a number of these rapid detoxification clinics, pretending to be a patient with some of these health risks, to see what the response was. Most of the people I spoke with dismissed health problems like extremely high blood pressure, or even history of a stroke, claiming that they could still work with these risky issues…just for a much higher fee.

Personally, I do not like to put my life in the hands of one who is out for financial gain, first and foremost. When it comes to healthcare, the patient should come first. The patient’s well-being should come before the dollar. I feel like a rapid opiate detoxification clinic that would take these high-risk patients, weighing profit before potential death, simply do not have the patient’s best interest at hand. Secondly, any clinic that offers the “magic pill,” or “miracle cure” is most likely offering up a pipedream. Recovery from addiction begins with detox, and for these rapid detoxification clinics to only suggest counseling or other aspects of treatment, without providing many viable resources for it, is by no means putting their patient’s well being first.


LINK.............. http://www.itsalljunk.net/5-things-you- ... pid-detox/

OKay, hope this helps.
I would REALLY do my homework, here
Im sure any of us would pay thousands for the garranty of a 'free ticket' outta opiate addiction, but I just dont think it exists
even this article says, months of PAWS may continue afterwards, and they dont talk about suboxone, which is sopposed to be real bad for PAWS (or that's what we hear, here anyways!)

good luck, in whatever you decide!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

_________________
anyone can give up,
its the easiest thing in the world to do, but to
hold it together, when everyone would understand if you fell apart
That's TRUE STRENGTH
http://almostoneyearclean.blogspot.com/


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 Post subject: Thanks, I needed that.
PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2012 2:48 pm 
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Well I am scheduling to go in. With all you had me read and being opiate dependant, and no longer necessary, to having my pain pump with Prialt a non narcotic. I have no cravings and only the desire to get all the poisons out of my system. I have tapered down to nothing but sleep deprivation is taking its toll. My hips won't stay in their sockets, next needed surgery, and my body isn't able to do the workouts that really are required.

I have been doing this since June and I see it being atleast a month or two, been saying that for awhile. Took much longer than I thought it would. I should have done it months ago, but I have had such terrible, w/d. I can't even be let out alone. Get too anxious. I don't know if I will be mad, glad, or still just nutty. I am doing so much better now, but had a terrible episiode at the Dr. office today. I do much better alone and safe in my room. Driving me nuts being an extrovert who wants to live again. I have literally been locked up in my room for the past 18 years due to a terrible car accident I was in. The Prialt brought me back to life and I would like to live it feeling unhindered by any medications. I am taking only the sub, clondine, and prialt. Yea. Almost there....

Thanks again. I have been through all the steps to a good recovery. I have great support and a great life to create now. Will come back and do an after rapid detox and get on the PAWS channel. ha ha.. I will be one that is here 5 years from now to let the Doc know it can be done.....


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2012 5:15 pm 
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Hi brittanyann, and welcome. Sorry you've been through so much pain. I'm trying to understand what you're planning to do. You've been tapering since June and you're essentially down to nothing now, but you're still going through with the rapid detox? I'm wondering if you read Dr. Junig's recent blog post on Suboxone withdrawal? It sounds like you're at the point where the Sub is off your receptors and your receptors now need to regenerate - which takes 8-12 weeks.
All rapid detox does is rip the opiate off the receptors (and it doesn't work with buprenorphine). But it sounds like youre already past that point. So why would you pay someone $7500? Or am I totally misunderstanding what you are saying? If you have already tapered off and are going through the miserable, sleepless part (which is very short lived), you could put that money towards massages, hot tubbing, or anything else that will give you comfort until you start to feel better. Also, a lot of people find a short course (like a week) of Ambien or other sleep aid helpful. Once you start sleeping everything else gets better.
Hope you feel better soon,
Lilly

Amber- that post should definitely be stickied


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 Post subject: TIRED.
PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2012 10:48 am 
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No I am still on little peices and I mean getting really little. But they are 8mg not 2. Wish I had two's. I am wondering when I can jump. Tried to but the burning I get makes me scream with pain. Not, tolerable for 10 plus days. Having problems with my normal pain as you know getting this stuff out of the receptors makes pain increase. I am using my pain pump and came up with problems using Clonidine. It has given me dry mouth, bad bad case. So now I have to contend with that, and my hips won't stay in their sockets. I am unable to do the physical activity that I have attempted to do and know helps. Can't move enough of my major muscles to help. So, lowering the clonindine and now the burning is worse and more often.

How much longer will i have to taper? I go through w/d every tapering. Since day one. I have slept, if you call it that, no longer than 2 hours solid, until exhaustion hits. Then six for a night and it starts all over again. Since June. Truthfully, how much longer? When I should have done the rapid, what a fool I have been, June. I can't leave my house alone because I get anxiety attacks. I almost threw a cup accross my Dr.'s office this morning. Weird, they are like seizures. I get all pumped up and can't much control it, better now on lower dose. It hits a certain level, and I get released and feel normal, if you can call this state normal, again. Freakie. Now I am rambling.

I will say this, the toughest challenge of my life. My sub doc should be slapped silly.. Not telling me he was placing me back on the drugs I paid him to get me off. I thought the first w/d which was terrible onto sub was tough enough. Now I have to do this again. So heart breaking... And being neurotic in my thinking is so hard. I just remember it is just chemicals creating this.... Heck I even got the one where you had visions of suicide. Pics of how I could drown myself in my tub. Was so trippie. So glad I have read up on this ordeal, I would have turned myself in. Thank god I have my mom the poor thing. Having to watch all this and not be able to do anything about it. Keep telling her it is just chemicals and I will come out of it hopefully soon. Don't know if she can watch me try to jump again. I didn't know if I had guts to continue this horribleness myself. Failing sucks, and having to put myself into such pain is beyond comprehension. And, I just remember how much better I am feeling as I get lower and lower off this drug.

I was rethinking my position. But how long? I can take a lot of pain. I have to wear special material for clothing and bedding. I can't have anything touch my skin. It burns like having a sunburn. I had to wrap myself in compression stockings from head to arm and use back braces to help me though this stuff. Looks funny but compression helps pain..... Use tub, sauna. I will sit on my bed and dance with my upper body trying to work out. Better then letting atrophy get me. Helps. I am such a dork. Sorry rambling again.

I will read this post you suggested. Thanks for helping me, I was begining to lose hope... Don't want my mom to have to suffer with me.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2012 9:00 pm 
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With the combination of physical problems, pain and now the detox - plus what sounds like depression, I'm wondering if you should consider an inpatient hospitalization. Someone was on here recently who said he went to a detox facility to get off Sub. They gave him comfort meds, I believe, and monitored him physically until he was off for 30 days. Maybe being under the care of medical professionals is something you would consider while you get through this.
Hope you feel better,
Lilly


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 Post subject: thanks
PostPosted: Thu Oct 25, 2012 2:32 pm 
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Usually don't have depression until I started detoxing. Then I became all over the tone scale. It is sleep deprivation that I am suffering from. Since June when I started I have not been able to sleep but 6 hours. Usually I get 2 hours wake in pain lucky to sleep another 2 till I am so exhausted my body shuts down for 6. Been hard on this poor body. Allergic to all the comfort drugs even clonidine give me such dry mouth my tounge stuck on the roof of my mouth. Been a terrible ordeal. It doesn't matter how little I decrease my tapering to, w/d will follow.
I have come to the conclusion my taper is so rough due to amount of years I have been on opiates, and other medications. 18 years almost 2 on sub. I believe it is the PAWS aspect. My brain is readjusting.
I am down to .125. I think I jumped too big this time I haven't balanced out yet been 10 days. But, I have not been using the water taper, think to get a sure exact dose I will start today. I have to be getting closer to jumping. I am going to tough it out. My Mom is freaking, I tried to jump earlier and I couldn't take the pain by day three. I am hoping that this will not be the case the next time. If so, I am going to do the rapid detox.

I have already went through a terrible experience with a treatment prog. They almost killed me. Made my 2/3 of my hair fall out. Went from 128 lbs to 109 all under medical supervision. They over dosed me on drugs that I was having side effects to then told me it was my thyroid and gave me more drugs.

Now working with a great doc. I am so upset with the fact that my sub dr. didn't tell me that he was going to make me go through withdrawals, and put me back on an opiate that I would have to deal with it all over again. He was when I left willing to do another rapid detox to get me off the subooxne for another 20,000. After taking me to the cleaners for 36,000 for the first one. Sorry, I am very upset with this ordeal. I am drug dependant. I want this whole terrible nightmarish happening far far behind me. Wow w/d's get your mood a going.

I am usually happy go lucky. I am having a rough time reajusting to the living. I have been for almost the last 8 years locked in my room with migraines. It is all a bit overwhelming. But, I have the best support and will do best at home safe. I have someone to talk with 24/7. But, w/d's has made me a bit neurotic. I am safe and as sane as I can be in such circumstances. I just relly want it all over with. PAWS will be a picnic, already havint the emotional and mental issues. Know what is expected....

Thanks for all the great information. Please if you read this leave a post even just saying, YOU CAN AND WILL MAKE IT THROUGH. Please........


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 25, 2012 2:34 pm 
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Sorry I rambled about info I already stated. Wow can't wait till I can think straight again.


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Fond Du Lac Psychiatry
Dr. Jeffrey Junig, M.D., Ph.D.

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