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 Post subject: Question regarding NAS
PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 5:31 pm 
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I keep reading all these posts from women who have given birth and the babies have withdrawal symptoms and then they are put on a lot of morphine and/or phenobarbital. Every cry, squirm and nap is considered withdrawals and they are kept in the NICU for weeks..
I then have come across women who breastfeed and this seems to help some babies through withdrawals..
So anyway, my question is this :
Could my husband and I refuse for our daughter to be treated with medication? I would like to breastfeed FIRST to see if that will help and then if there are problems we'd consider medication. I just really don't want her to have to be on meds if that isn't 100% necessary and after all the things I've heard about some drs and nurses being so quick to diagnose a subutex baby with NAS, I wouldn't want her to be put on morphine just because she cried or twitched.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2014 12:40 am 
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I wish the answer was 'yes'. I've seen a number of great outcomes at our local, small-town hospital, just because the OBs have decided to chill out and let women breast feed. Then there are the referral hospitals, with NICUs and neonatologists, that seem to go crazy with interventions that only make things worse. For example.... it is hard to keep IVs going in newborns. Each new IV (the veins are fragile, and 'blow' frequently), usually takes multiple sticks. Veins are in short supply, so they end up with IV's in scalp veins, arms, hands, feet, legs... Do the people who write about the horrors of withdrawal ever consider the pain babies go through, held down for hours while people try to get lines in?

Sorry.... I get a bit worked up...

I think that for women on buprenorphine, there must be a discussion and evaluation of the doctors involved, to make sure that they aren't trapped into situations where they have no control. There are a few doctors out there who actually talk with patients and take their opinions seriously.... then there are doctors who don't. It is probably also a good idea to see if the hospital has any 'policies' that force certain types of care--- or if parents are guaranteed a role in the process.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2014 9:17 am 
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suboxdoc wrote:
I wish the answer was 'yes'. I've seen a number of great outcomes at our local, small-town hospital, just because the OBs have decided to chill out and let women breast feed. Then there are the referral hospitals, with NICUs and neonatologists, that seem to go crazy with interventions that only make things worse. For example.... it is hard to keep IVs going in newborns. Each new IV (the veins are fragile, and 'blow' frequently), usually takes multiple sticks. Veins are in short supply, so they end up with IV's in scalp veins, arms, hands, feet, legs... Do the people who write about the horrors of withdrawal ever consider the pain babies go through, held down for hours while people try to get lines in?

Sorry.... I get a bit worked up...

I think that for women on buprenorphine, there must be a discussion and evaluation of the doctors involved, to make sure that they aren't trapped into situations where they have no control. There are a few doctors out there who actually talk with patients and take their opinions seriously.... then there are doctors who don't. It is probably also a good idea to see if the hospital has any 'policies' that force certain types of care--- or if parents are guaranteed a role in the process.



Thank you for replying. I get worked up over this too, so no need to apologize.
Also, I've really enjoyed reading your POV on pregnancy and subutex. You make so much sense!!
I've been trying to research this issue for the last 30 weeks, but as you probably know, there isn't much. Most of what I've found is very discouraging and doesn't give us mothers much hope. It's almost as if some doctors and nurses believe we aren't worthy of making decisions for our own children just because we didn't or couldn't come off the subutex during pregnancy.
I've tried to inform myself as much as possible on the subject and it'd be nice if any doctor who treats addiction and the NAS babies would do the same. I just came across a YouTube video from Johns Hopkins. It raises a question for me..
Why don't they treat buprenorphine babies with buprenorphine?! Why morphine or even worse (imo) Methadone? The video also goes on to say that treating NAS babies with clonidine actually helps reduce withdrawals and the time spent in the hospital. Why aren't more hospitals doing this then?
So many questions.. I will be calling the hospital to find out the policy for NAS babies. I refuse to be left out of her treatment plan, nor will I tolerate being treated any differently.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2014 4:11 pm 
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Hey Abbcmom,

I think that YOU are absolutely doing the right thing! Sometimes we, as addicted patients, have to really grow some nerve and stand up for ourselves, because NOBODY is going to do it for us. We have to realize that what we have done in our past does not negate our rights as patients today. ESPECIALLY when it involves our rights as parents to decide the treatment of our children!

I'm so proud of you for standing up for yourself, and I know that it is going to make a huge difference for your baby! Just keep your cool, and insist on knowing what the policy is. No need to get upset as long as they treat you with respect. But, there is nothing wrong with you demanding the same respect that any other patient would be treated with!

Good luck, and please let us know how it goes!

Q

_________________
No one can make you feel inferior without your consent. ~ Eleanor Roosevelt


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2014 4:48 pm 
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Thank you qhorsegal. You are SO right- our past should NOT be any indicator of our future. I know the saying, "best predictor of future behavior is past behavior", but it's not always the case. This is my fourth child and my first three were born healthy and I wasn't on anything with them, so what does my past have to do with anything? However, the stigma is and will always be attached to me. Even though having children is the reason I became addicted to pain meds. I was 17 when I had my first. Young, dumb and naive. I had no idea the road I was going down. But so many of us became addicted because we followed the advice of a doctor. ANYWAY! Ranting a bit.. I will definitely update once baby is born.. personally, I wish more women did update once their babes are born. I know I've wondered about many of these women and how their babies did and are doing now.


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