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 Post subject: Pregnancy and suboxone
PostPosted: Thu Jan 28, 2016 6:54 pm 
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Hi my name is Jessica
I had two pregnancies while on the drug suboxone/subutex. While I was pregnant I searched online for information that the doctors couldn't tell me. I wanted stories from moms . Stories regardless if they are good or bad but some information on what to expect while pregnant and after my baby was born. I found that there was a deficit on these stories. Mainly it was other mothers (pregnant) looking for information too. Im now trying to share my stories with anyone that was in the same state I was in 2 and 6 years ago. I'd anyone would like information on my personal story I would be happy to share. Many moms are preoccupied with their babies and rhey don't think to come back and update . If anyone has questions or wants to hear my stories you can leave your email in response and I will respond. Due to the nature of the stories I prefer to correspond by email. Good luck mamas


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 04, 2016 2:49 pm 
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Thank You Jzmama,

We have an entire section dedicated to Suboxone and pregnancy so please share your story there. That way we have accurate information instead of just gossip and guessing. Check it out.

Welcome to the forum!

rule

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 06, 2016 12:34 am 
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Thanks Rule-- well said.

A couple years ago I was asked to give a presentation to a 'tri-county' area of Wisconsin about babies and children born to mothers on opioids-- women who went through pregnancy actively using opioids, or on maintenance agents like buprenorphine or methadone.

I did extensive literature searches. I found a large amount of information about 'NAS'-- neonatal abstinence syndrome-- that basically found that women on buprenorphine had a 50% chance of NAS in their babies. The NAS was milder in children of moms on buprenorphine than it was in children of moms on methadone. Moreover, the symptoms were much more 'prevalent' if the nurses knew that the moms were on buprenorphine. In other words, babies born to moms on buprenorphine were often seen as 'normal' until the nurses learned that the moms were on buprenorphine, and only THEN did they identify the babies as having NAS.

But that wasn't the surprising part. The surprising part was that I could find no studies that found abnormalities in children of mothers on opioids beyond NAS. There was no sign of the 'crack baby phenomenon'--- i.e. children with long-term problems because of their mothers' drug use.

I was surprised by that finding. I truly expected there to be SOME difference in those kids. But when other factors were removed through statistical analysis-- removing the effects of cigarette smoking (which clearly causes lower birth-weights) and less prenatal care (which increased risks of low birth-weight and complications at delivery), and obesity (which increases the risk of glucose intolerance and overweight babies)-- being on opioids did NOT act as an independent variable that increased the risk of morbidity. There was no increase in ADD, in hyperactivity, or in 'special needs' rates. There were no differences in cognitive performance in kids who born to moms on opioids, compared to other kids. Studies were done out to age 5 or 6... and no differences could be found.

The most interesting studies, at least to me, are the ones that prove me wrong. As I presented those results to the social workers, nurses, and other people at the talk I was giving, the audience was clearly as surprised as i was-- and almost appeared to be angry or disappointed. I kept getting the same question-- but what about LONG TERM? What sorts of things should we, as social workers and people in CPS look for? I kept repeating what I'd found-- and what I didn't find.

I'm sure there will always be people out there who assume those moms are hurting their kids... but honest, those moms should know that people have LOOKED for problems--- and can't find them. There ARE problems associated with smoking cigarettes, no prenatal care, obesity, and poverty (which is linked to other variables, but is also linked to problems independently for reasons that are not entirely clear). But you are NOT hurting your baby because you are on buprenorphine or methadone. It just ain't so.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 06, 2016 9:38 pm 
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I made this topic a sticky because Dr. Junig has written a very informative and important post.

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Fond Du Lac Psychiatry
Dr. Jeffrey Junig, M.D., Ph.D.

  • Board Certified Psychiatrist
  • Asst Clinical Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin

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