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 Post subject: Pink Cloud? What is it?
PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2012 3:08 pm 
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When I used Suboxone in the past (7-8 years ago) it went smooth. There were crappy days but everything was manageable.
What is this Pink Cloud im hearing about? I took Suboxone again knowing that its not a "silver bullet" and there will be still some withdrawals but I dont remember it being hard. Just instead of a short 1 week (2 week mabey) cold turkey of complete withdrawals. Suboxone is a longer more manageable withdrawal. Right?

Please clear this up because I tend to over think stuff and make a moutain out of a mole hill and this Pink Cloud subject has me thinking. :)

Thanks,
Damian


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2012 5:29 pm 
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Never heard of "pink cloud"....been on suboxone for on-going 4 years now. If there's something or some sort of negative affect that suboxone has on a person, I should've experienced it by now, I would think.

The only problems that I can really say are Suboxone-related, and I'm not 100% sure of that, is this:

Sometimes, when I have to pee, I need to stand there for ...30 seconds or so. I always joke with my wife (because a lot of the times she is lying in the bed and I use our master bathroom) and I tell her that I was just trying to find it so I didn't pee down my leg...just to get her to laugh. But it is 'somewhat' annoying.
Now if I have to go really bad, or been holding for a while, then I have no trouble at all going right away...it's just when I think to myself "oh, I might as well go before I lay down to sleep, or I'll have to get up in the middle of the night"...and those are the times when I really don't have to go that bad, but there's enough there that I can tell that I COULD go if I tried.

And secondly, the sleep part. I never (yes, even before opiates, before active addiction) had any sort of GOOD sleep patterns. I had these factory jobs that had me working odd hours. Hell, one job I even worked at a cotton mill (Avondale Mills) and was on 12hr midnights, from 6pm to 6am. Another job I had, this one for 4 years, I was on a swing shift...7a to 3p one week, 3p to 11p the next week, then 11p to 7am the 3rd week....then start over with 7a to 3p again. I did this swinging weekly, so I never had the time to adjust to sleeping...I slept when I could close my eyes.

So I've had challenges with sleep ANYWAY..but now, with Suboxone, I can go lay down in the bed at 4pm, and sleep until 12am, and I'm up and ready to go at midnight. But sleep pattern isn't a big complaint of mine with Suboxone. It's not really something that I say "well, I can't sleep good because of Suboxone..."
The way I look at it is this, just as I told my wife one day last week, 'I like getting up earlier, at 2am or 3am, because that gives me the opportunity to do my internet stuff, facebook, post here, etc...and I have NO interruptions. I still manage to be active during the day, but I'm just up in front of the computer before everyone else is. No big deal to me.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2012 8:19 pm 
Hi Damian

My understanding of "Pink Cloud" is it being a synonym to "the honeymoon period", a condition where a person is excessively euphoric and over confident just after recovery has started, it really has nothing to do with buprenorphine in particular and I think was first used by AA probably as a play on the term "Pink Elephants" eg. " Old Joe has gone from seeing Pink Elephants to being in a Pink Cloud.
I guess the danger is that after a period of time and a few mishaps reality strikes, the honeymoon ends and the person eventually comes down to earth with a thud and may even relapse.
Hope that helps
Cheers
Subie


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2012 12:50 am 
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Subie explained the pink cloud phenomenon really well. I just wanted to add, in my experience, people coming off of opiates don't seem to get the pink cloud for a while. Once the acute wd is over, that's typically when our "pink clouds" come into play.

People coming off of other drugs seem to get the "pink cloud" effect pretty quickly.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2012 7:32 pm 
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People tend to tell you to "watch the pink cloud" or to be careful with it because often times when we first quit something, being sober is enjoyable. I think this has to do with both psychological and physical reasons. After you get over the acute physical stuff, it starts to feel good to get your natural chemicals kicking again. The same reason that it is good to exercise in withdrawal. Mentally, some start to think "man, this was easy. I can probably use once in awhile now." Obviously, that is very difficult to do, especially with opiates IMO. Many of us at one point felt that we functioned "better" on full-agonist opiates (and very well might have for some time). That is an allure for me. Thankfully, I know its not possible.

I was a very cyclical user, off and on. Off and on. I actually started to enjoy the pink cloud. I would always always taper myself off as well. Those first few days when you realize you are in the clear, feel good physically can be pretty nice. Heck, I have some very powerful memories relating to them.

When I got off on Sub, I was coming down from my biggest "run" I had in years. I very much felt a pink cloud. Thankfully, I knew it was going to end. Many "first timers" really struggle when the pink cloud ends. They start to feel depressed again, couple those with the thoughts I described earlier it becomes something we need to try to be aware of.

Do not fret over it too much. And use the time to your advantage. Try to establish good patterns during the "cloud".


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2012 9:29 pm 
stephent wrote:
People tend to tell you to "watch the pink cloud" or to be careful with it because often times when we first quit something, being sober is enjoyable. I think this has to do with both psychological and physical reasons. After you get over the acute physical stuff, it starts to feel good to get your natural chemicals kicking again. The same reason that it is good to exercise in withdrawal. Mentally, some start to think "man, this was easy. I can probably use once in awhile now." Obviously, that is very difficult to do, especially with opiates IMO. Many of us at one point felt that we functioned "better" on full-agonist opiates (and very well might have for some time). That is an allure for me. Thankfully, I know its not possible.

I was a very cyclical user, off and on. Off and on. I actually started to enjoy the pink cloud. I would always always taper myself off as well. Those first few days when you realize you are in the clear, feel good physically can be pretty nice. Heck, I have some very powerful memories relating to them.

When I got off on Sub, I was coming down from my biggest "run" I had in years. I very much felt a pink cloud. Thankfully, I knew it was going to end. Many "first timers" really struggle when the pink cloud ends. They start to feel depressed again, couple those with the thoughts I described earlier it becomes something we need to try to be aware of.

Do not fret over it too much. And use the time to your advantage. Try to establish good patterns during the "cloud".


Spot on 8)


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2012 12:47 am 
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Thank you...

Jonathanm1978 / Subie / Romeo / Stephent



That clears alot up. The only time that was crappy was at the end when I was like at 0.50 to 0.25 and I had to stay here for awhile and then jump. It wasn't too bad just feeling alittle crappy but totally manageable. All in all from the beginning to the end , starting , using and tapering off was like a "too good to be true" feeling. Can't believe there was/is a easy way off opiate addiction as this is.



Thanks again,
Damian


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 Post subject: My personally delema
PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2012 9:45 pm 
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Look, I am new to this sight, and I want to start by saying I know sub has helped many people that are on the junk hard. It has taken people who are homless and gotten them back steady. But for the light opiate addiction hydros, vicoden, ect It is a gateway to hell. I have been through WD of these and it is a cake walk compared to sub WD. I have now been on sub for 2 years and can not exscape its grip. It has taken me from the class clown guy, with numorus friends, and a high energy person to someone that just exists. I dont get happy, I dont get sad, i just get trough the day. Based on my research this is a pretty common side effect. I have tried to wd but the month long process always outlast my will. I have tappered down and it still drives me insaine. the restless legs, the insomnia, the hot, cold, hot, cold feeling is torture. A vicodine wd is a vacation compared to sub. Like I said if you are on H., by all means it is a very useful treatment but I have become nothing emotionally. I dont feel anymore. nothing. I have no drive, and I have a good job, make good money, have a great family, and things that used to bring me joy just are activities that i do. there is no fun in life anymore. so I want to know has anyone else went through these feelings?


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2012 1:38 am 
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Ummm, not to be a smart ass, but why don't you just get back on Vicoden and withdrawal off of those? It sounds like Vicoden wd isn't too hard for you.

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 Post subject: Re: My personally delema
PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2012 9:47 am 
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mcafee3604 wrote:
Look, I am new to this sight, and I want to start by saying I know sub has helped many people that are on the junk hard. It has taken people who are homless and gotten them back steady. But for the light opiate addiction hydros, vicoden, ect It is a gateway to hell. I have been through WD of these and it is a cake walk compared to sub WD. I have now been on sub for 2 years and can not exscape its grip. It has taken me from the class clown guy, with numorus friends, and a high energy person to someone that just exists. I dont get happy, I dont get sad, i just get trough the day. Based on my research this is a pretty common side effect. I have tried to wd but the month long process always outlast my will. I have tappered down and it still drives me insaine. the restless legs, the insomnia, the hot, cold, hot, cold feeling is torture. A vicodine wd is a vacation compared to sub. Like I said if you are on H., by all means it is a very useful treatment but I have become nothing emotionally. I dont feel anymore. nothing. I have no drive, and I have a good job, make good money, have a great family, and things that used to bring me joy just are activities that i do. there is no fun in life anymore. so I want to know has anyone else went through these feelings?


I'm sorry sub isn't everything you hoped it would be. But please remember that what applies to you doesn't apply to everyone. Please, do NOT present your opinion as FACT. It's not the amount of opiates a person was on, it's HOW BAD their addiction was.

And if you're willing, you could tell us about your taper and we could try to help you. Chances are you are tapering way too fast and that's why you're experiencing severe w/d. We are ADDICTS and we have w/d coming to us. Suboxone is not a free ride. It's a tool only. We are responsible for our remission/recovery. Taking suboxone alone isn't a magic bullet and to expect that won't get anyone very far, especially when they stop taking it. I mean, what will have changed after stopping sub treatment, other than the physical dependency? There's SO MUCH MORE than that to opiate addiction.

Maybe you'll let us help you?

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 Post subject: My pink cloud
PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2012 5:46 pm 
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Romeo wrote:
Subie explained the pink cloud phenomenon really well. I just wanted to add, in my experience, people coming off of opiates don't seem to get the pink cloud for a while. Once the acute wd is over, that's typically when our "pink clouds" come into play.

People coming off of other drugs seem to get the "pink cloud" effect pretty quickly.


I remember the pink cloud when I finally got off of a year long crack addiction, although I had no idea it was called a pink cloud until today! It was the very first time in my life that I actually loved and appreciated life. I felt like I could do anything, and didn't need anybody because I felt so amazing. I never experienced that feeling before unless I was high on something. It was very surreal. I was very confident that I never had to use drugs again, and felt like I finally caught up with the rest of the world in seeing how beautiful and wonderful life could be and I actually had hope for the future. Now that I look back, I actually acted pretty cocky during that time and I felt like I had everything figured out. And now here I am again. Addicted to yet another drug. Once I get on Suboxone in a few days, at least now I'll know what it is if it happens this time, and that unfortunately, it doesn't just last forever.


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