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PostPosted: Sat Mar 01, 2014 8:42 pm 
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My suboxone usage started almost 10 years ago to help me get off opiates such as oxycontin, percocet, and methadone. My life has completely changed for the worse since I've been on suboxone. I've lost almost all my friends and literally ALL I do is go to work, come home and lay in bed and watch TV. I have NO energy, body aches, VERY poor circulation, and I always feel very cold so I bundle up which causes me to sweat profusely. I could literally go on and on about my problems since I've been on suboxone. I used to be very athletic too. I'd finally had enough and about a year and a half ago so I checked myself into rehab and spent 28 days there. My insurance wouldn't cover it so I spent every penny I had to enter treatment and get my life back. I stayed sober for more than 8 months but the whole time I felt worse than I did when I was on suboxone. I couldn't work, almost lost my job and couldn't even shower! I showered I think twice in 8 months! I just laid around feeling weak and tired so I just slept. I eventually made the tough choice to go back on suboxone so I wouldn't lose my job and could at least function somewhat. I've been back on it for almost a year and I feel completely hopeless. I've come off opiates before like oxycontin and before I relapsed I felt great. Stupid decision to start using again, I know. I don't understand why after 8 months I still felt like crap and I was literally the ONLY person leaving rehab feeling WORSE than when I got there. Can someone PLEASE HELP ME!? I'm desperate to get my life back! -Michael


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 9:22 pm 
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You are making a mistake, blaming all your problems on Suboxone. Opioid dependence is progressive, and every relapse is worse than the last. Beyond that, LIFE tends to get harder and harder over time. All those people you see walking at 5 AM? They don't do it because they WANT to get out of bed and walk; they do it because then know that if they lay in bed too long, they will feel tired, depressed, and withdrawn.

You went into a depression when you were on Suboxone; it is not a miracle pill, and if all you did was stop opioid agonists, go on Suboxone, and think life would get better, you were mistaken. See my last post at www.suboxonetalkzone.com --- why some people feel WORSE when starting Suboxone.

Then you made the huge mistake to stop Suboxone, when you were already depressed. Withdrawal from ANY opioids will cause depression, and make existing depression much worse.

I strongly recommend that you stabilize your opioid situation-- i.e. take a dose of buprenorphine that keeps you above the ceiling effect across the dosing interval-- usually 4-16 mg per day. THEN, do all of the things that ALL of us do to tolerate life; exercise at minimum 3 days per week (or less vigorously, every single day). Walking at work does NOT count, by the way...

Set your alarm exactly 8 hours after you go to bed, and never hit the snooze alarm... work a job at least 40 hours per week or go to school full time and work part-time-- and FORCE yourself to practice social situations. NA or AA is perfect, if you don't have anything else.

Finally, develop interests in things. Find a hobby. Learn to play an instrument and get lost in the music. Collect rocks, and read about where each type comes from.

If you are smoking pot, drinking, or taking benzos, nothing will change---- so decide whether you want to stay the same, or whether you are ready to do what we all did when we decided to get more out of life.

If you do these things, you will feel happier, stronger, and healthier. You could run a marathon in a year if you set your mind to it. But understand that most addicts miss out on a huge amount of learning about coping with life..... so you have a lot of catching up to do.

Blaming everything on buprenorphine accomplishes nothing-- except serve as a great reason to avoid doing all of the things that would help you feel better!


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 9:43 pm 
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Thank you for your reply! I appreciate the time you took to respond! I wasn't trying to blame subs for my problems I just couldn't think of what else it could be since I've come off opiates before and was feeling great. I'm also on anti depressants and have also been on adderall for approximately 12 years. Adderall seemed to really help me focus at first, now I can't wake up and get out of bed without it. The antidepressants help me from feeling completely hopeless and waking up crying. I don't know if any of that changes anything you've suggested I do but I will give it a shot. And thank you again for your response I really appreciate it!


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 01, 2016 10:20 pm 
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Quote:
I wasn't trying to blame subs for my problems I just couldn't think of what else it could be since I've come off opiates before and was feeling great. I'm also on anti depressants and have also been on adderall for approximately 12 years. Adderall seemed to really help me focus at first, now I can't wake up and get out of bed without it. The antidepressants help me from feeling completely hopeless and waking up crying.


I know this is kind of an old thread but I'm new here and saw this and felt it deserved a comment. OP, your answer is your own post. Drugs, despite what any MD will tell you, and the human body/mind do not work hand in hand long term. Any MD that tells you that any psych med won't give you side effects long term is completely full of it.

Don't get me wrong, drugs are very helpful when used short term and if used correctly. But long term, nutrition is the only thing that will make you feel close to how you did before you started taking these chemicals.

12 years ago I made the mistake of getting hooked on performance enhancers which led to a 12 year, up-and-down battle with PEDs, benzos, opiates, and finally suboxone to get off, and I am only sure of one thing: given enough time, all drugs will destroy the body/mind if taken daily, and given enough time, the body and mind WILL HEAL once you get ALL of these toxins out of you.

You want to start feeling normal and happy again, which for you, would take at least a few months, then you have to get all of these toxic chemicals out and let your body and mind start to naturally heal. That's the only way you will ever begin to feel like yourself again. Both adderall and all anti-depressants are VERY powerful, mind altering chemicals that will cause imbalance given enough time.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 02, 2016 11:14 pm 
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I'm not saying that you are wrong, but I would feel better if this claim was backed up scientifically. Have there been studies that show these drugs cause imbalances? Is it possible that some chemicals fix an imbalance that the brain had in the first place? There are plenty of people who are born with medical conditions caused by a body system that is not in balance. Sometimes nutrition can help them, but more often the might need a medication or series of medications. Doesn't make sense that the brain could have an idiopathic imbalance which needs a medication to fix it. Historically, the people with such maladies were shut into institutions if their condition was bad enough.

I just don't know if it's fair to tell desperate people that nutrition will end up fixing them naturally. Especially when people develop depression through no nutritional fault of their own. I agree that trying to be healthy is a worthy goal, but the people who come here often have co-occurring mental disorders that they have been trying to treat for years. (That's usually why they become addicted to opiates in the first place.)

Amy

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