It is currently Mon Nov 20, 2017 3:24 pm



All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Our Sponsors





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2011 12:47 am 
Offline
Average Poster
Average Poster
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 3:34 am
Posts: 28
Location: Northern California
New York Times article on the smuggling of Sub into prisons

I thought you all would find this story in yesterday's NYT about sub smuggling into prisons to be interesting. I found it both fascinating and frustrating. I worry that stuff like this could be used to challenge the legitimacy of Sub as a treatment option.


Last edited by annabella65 on Sat May 28, 2011 1:36 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2011 1:32 am 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2010 10:39 am
Posts: 4026
Location: Sitting at my computer
That is an interesting article. Just the kind of media attention that Suboxone does not need. It's bothered me for quite some time how Suboxone has found it's way "to the streets". This drug, used properly, is a potential life saver and its continued diversion is going to do nothing but make it harder for patients with legimate needs to get it and that angers me greatly.

_________________
Be kind to yourself. Our character defects do NOT define who we are!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2011 2:16 am 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Apr 27, 2009 12:47 am
Posts: 1459
More evidence that the war on drugs has been a complete fucking success. :roll:

God forbid that they actually TREAT the illness of incarcerated opiate addicts. WTF.

_________________
You can't stop the waves, but you can learn to surf.

-Jack Kornfield


Top
 Profile  
 
Our Sponsors
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2011 6:38 am 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 12:55 pm
Posts: 4847
Location: Leesburg, FL
I was going to post the very same article. For those that didn't read the article for whatever reason, I wanted to share the following excerpt from it that I found interesting:

Quote:
The Maine Civil Liberties Union sued last year on behalf of a woman who was arrested on a traffic violation while taking Suboxone for opiate addiction but not allowed to continue her treatment in jail. The parties settled out of court, but Zachary Heiden, the group’s legal director, said he would continue to press for Suboxone treatment in the state’s jails.

“If they’re not providing a way for inmates to treat their addictions,” he said, “it makes sense that they’re using unlawful means to get that treatment.”


With any luck the ACLU will continue working on this and it will spread to other states beyond Maine. People not receiving their sub treatment is prisons/jails is just wrong on so many levels, in my opinion. I'll bet they aren't refusing people their insulin or BP medication!! Bastards.

_________________
-As I have grown older, I've learned that pleasing everyone is impossible, but pissing everyone off is a piece of cake.

-I'm only responsible for what I say, not for what you understand.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2011 11:29 am 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jun 17, 2009 9:59 pm
Posts: 993
Location: Carson City, Nevada
Diary of a Quitter wrote:
More evidence that the war on drugs has been a complete fucking success. :roll:

God forbid that they actually TREAT the illness of incarcerated opiate addicts. WTF.


No kidding!! And we have to keep funding this completely ridiculous 'war on drugs' with our precious tax dollars. It seriously pisses me off, when the whole thing has proven itself to be a monumental failure.

laddertipper

_________________
First you take a drink, then the drink takes a drink, then the drink takes you. ~F. Scott Fitzgerald


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2011 11:52 am 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 01, 2011 12:59 pm
Posts: 1053
Some of the comments that followed that article were much more disturbing than the article itself, so I couldn't help but throw my 2 cents in. As long as society thinks that Sub is just another legal high they're going to be against it. How can we educate the public that Sub is primarily an opiate BLOCKER, that also reduces or eliminates cravings in addition to treating the initial withdrawals?
Even the diverters that we are so concerned about (with good reason) are IMO primarily those who are either self treating or just trying to stay out of withdrawals in between using. I think the opiate naive folks who OD trying to use Sub to get high are few and far between.
Yet articles like this one perpetuate the myth that Sub is just another contraband that people are buying and selling for jollies. Why don't they just give the inmates prescribed Sub their medicine, like they do with other legal medicines. *sigh*


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2011 2:07 am 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 15, 2010 5:08 am
Posts: 1497
Hey Lilly,

I completely understand and agree with what you're saying.

In jail however, it's unlikely that people will be able to get enough suboxone to keep themselves on some kind of illicit treatment. It would only come in dribs and drabs. Building up such a tolerance that they'd no longer get effect from Sub would be very difficult.

From what I've heard, people who go into jails in the US are basically forced into immediate detox. I'm unsure whether Methadone is prescribed in jail (as it is here in Aus), but from what I heard by an American ex-addict I met while in NA, you pretty much start your detox when you're put in remand, whether you like it or not.

Given that, it's likely that the people using it in jail will be getting an effect or a "high" from the Sub they take, just as we would feel a high if we had 4mg after being clean and opiate free for a month or two. Why they're choosing to smuggle in Sub, and not China, has me beat. The only reason I can attribute is that Sub is extremely accessible.

I can tell you what happens in Aus, as it's quite interesting should you guys consider Methadone / Sub programs in jail. A person who has a history of opiate addiction in Aus who end up in remand or incarcerated, is offered the choice of going on a program, be it Suboxone or Methadone. By far and wide most people choose Methadone, but not for the reason you'd assume. Because methadone is swallowed, and it's harder to smuggle, most people prefer it. If a person is given Suboxone, and the word gets out to their unit / pod (which it always does), they will basically be stood over, threatened, bashed or whatever until they agree to divert their dose for those people. The only people who choose to take Suboxone in jail are either those who want to profit from it - ie people who can handle themselves in jail, or have a solid crew for protection - or those who want it for themselves and know they can handle any threats.

Sub / Methadone is generally offered to those whose crimes have been drug related. Even if they're clean at the time - ie they got clean and got pinched for a crime years later - many will still take the Methadone because they basically wanna "sleep through" their time. Even Imovaine and OTC sleep aids are a valuable commodity.

I've never done hard time. But I've lived with many people who have, and this is what they tell me.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2011 2:35 pm 
Offline
6 Months or More
6 Months or More

Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 6:05 pm
Posts: 253
I guess that is not surprising. I ran into this guy I knew from HS at an NA meeting.. this was almost a year ago (time flies). Anyways at the meeting he was complaining about how he had no money. I said nice to see you and left. By the time I got home he had sent me a FB message offering to sell me Sub. He must have done it immediately.

Its bad seeds like him that put legit users in jeopardy. Especially in the US which is dominated by the 12 step approach.

Anyways, I think Sub should be used to detox in jail legitimately. If they continue to ignore it than prisoners will continue to do things like this.

Also, I know Bupenorphine is abused in Sweden as well.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2011 6:15 pm 
Offline
6 Months or More
6 Months or More

Joined: Tue May 18, 2010 9:08 pm
Posts: 248
I've just lately been doing a bit of reading about what a big problem the U. S. has with such a shockingly high percentage of the population incarcerated. Apparently a big contributing factor to that is in relation to drug-related convictions. I really wish the government would put more into education, treatment, and training instead of, or at least in conjunction with, incarceration, as it is clear that incarceration alone does not have a high success rate of rehabilitation. As for methadone and sub in jails and prisons, I don't know what the laws and policies regarding sub are--it sounds like jails and prisons routinely deny prisoners their prescribed sub and I think that's terrible. Do they deny prisoners other kinds of medications as well? I really don't know. I do remember that at the methadone clinic I tried a couple of times years ago, their policy was that if any client of theirs wound up in jail the clinic would make an effort to bring the person's dose to jail--but they could not make any guarantee about it. I know that some people do get methadone while in jail but from what I've heard it sounds like the jails usually only administer methadone temporarily and that they taper people off pretty quick and I don't know if they ever allow anyone to stay on methadone maintenance for any length of time. Overall I believe that the "correctional" institutions here in the U.S. are downright barbaric and prisoners with health issues of any kind may be at grave risk of being denied appropriate treatment. On the other hand, any law-abiding citizen lacking in financial resources is also in dire straits if they end up in poor health....


Top
 Profile  
 
   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Oct 01, 2011 3:50 pm 
Offline
Power Poster
Power Poster
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2010 12:54 am
Posts: 47
Location: NY NY
I've spent a total of 3 years in jail (spread out over 6 stays), all for prescription fraud. That is, until I found Sub. I actually heard about it in jail during my last time from a guy who was taking them legitimately before he was locked up. He had to go through withdrawal, as the jail would not allow Sub treatment. I thank God he told me about Sub because ever since I went on it two years ago I've had no further criminal charges, have stayed out of trouble, and successfully completed my probation (luckily my PO supported Sub use). If the government would just take 10% of the money they are using to warehouse drug offenders and apply it to treatment, including methadone and Sub, I think we would see a real difference in the opiate abuse problem. But unfortunately any voice that raises this point gets shouted down in the court of public opinion. Until the public can distinguish between "criminals" and drug addicts just trying to live, the problem will only get worse.

In the USA jails/prisons are big business. Many are privately owned, and all of them get federal and state money for each prisoner. They have to keep the jails full to get all the money. The private jails are for profit, which is just disgusting to me. The "War on Drugs" is a war against people - people that need help desperately. The more money that is poured into the "War" effort, the worse the problem gets. You have to treat the demand, not solely focus on the supply end of it. It really amuses me how all the coppers think they are making a difference, when in reality THEY are making the problem much worse. But hey, I'm just a criminal. LOL

James

_________________
"Never tease a weasel/The weasel will not like it/ And teasing isn’t nice!”


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Our Sponsors
Suboxone Forum latest topics RSS feed Subscribe to the entire forum
 

 

 
Fond Du Lac Psychiatry
Dr. Jeffrey Junig, M.D., Ph.D.

  • Board Certified Psychiatrist
  • Asst Clinical Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group