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 Post subject: New reasearch article!
PostPosted: Sun Dec 14, 2014 11:35 pm 
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I ran across an article on the National Institute on Drug Abuse about the efficacy of tapering off bupe versus a longer term on maintenance.

Here's the link: http://www.drugabuse.gov/news-events/ne ... ioid-abuse

It's not a surprise to many of us that maintenance works better than a quick detox and taper from sub, but it's nice to have some evidence to back it up!

Amy

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 15, 2014 1:05 am 
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Thanks for pointing that out, Amy. The taper was early-- after only six weeks-- so the result was not surprising. But as you pointed out, it is helpful to see some of these things spelled out in a very direct way.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 15, 2014 1:17 am 
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I agree!!! Seeing evidence that maintenance works better than rapid detox is great!!! For all the professionals I've met over the years who've criticized my choice to remain on maintenance suboxone, I hope this evidence reaches them! I have felt such a stigma and harsh judgement, (in 12 step meetings, from counselors & social workers, from doctors, and even family and friends) for my choice- many I've encountered consider maintenance a form of continued drug abuse on my part (only legal)! But I'm still an addict without the suboxone; only without it, I have cravings, pain, and increased depression; and my addiction is manageable on the suboxone! My hope is for maintenance to become a socially acceptable form on managing the disease of addiction:)

I've been on buprenorphine since September2004 (10+years!), with only 2 short breaks during that time (less than a few months each time). It works as well for me today as it did when I first started treatment:)

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 9:43 am 
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Hey Amy:

The new article you posted is just what I need. Taking it to my doctor today. Like I say in my closing quote in my signature line--"Knowledge is Power."

Thank you for keeping us all informed. I agree from experience :roll: that long-term maintenance beats taper, and this article supports that supposition.

Your post of the news from the NIDA site is great. For anyone wishing to dive deeper, this is the original publication of the findings in JAMA:

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamain ... le/1916910

Also found this this morning from NIDA-- https://www.drugabuse.gov/about-nida/le ... references

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 11:34 am 
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Thanks for the update, and for resurrecting this thread. This is the most significant issue related to buprenorphine-- i.e acceptance of the medication as a long-term addiction treatment. People who understand the medication or work with patients taking the medication tend to feel the same way-- that buprenorphine allows a person to move beyond opioid dependence and live a normal life, and so we should use it in that way. Doctors prescribe medications to reduce the risk and impact of illnesses, and we use more dangerous medications to treat illnesses that are more benign than opioid dependence. The other side of the discussion usually uses emotional arguments, like 'should you be on a drug your whole life?'. But those people have no problem with being on drugs that treat other illnesses, so that argument is hypocritical.

Amy has mentioned ways to promote this forum for the sake of getting the word out. One thing I do is go to media articles about addiction or addiction treatments, and write in the comment section about this issue. After the comment I leave a link or the URL of the forum. If anyone feels inclined to do the same, it would help to keep us higher up in search results.

On my blog I still get angry posts every week or so from 'suboxone-haters'. I have no idea why they spend their days bashing a medication. Maybe some of them are displaced workers from abstinence based programs or something like that!


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 4:55 pm 
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That is a very good point. I leave comments on articles over at the Fix here and there. I am also in a couple of facebook groups where I could mention how much information and support is available on our forum.

I will try to do a better job of doing that!

Amy

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