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PostPosted: Fri Jul 24, 2009 11:59 pm 
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Hi, I'm a drug addict, my preference, percocet 10mg about eight a day at it's worse.
I was a law enforcement officer for several years but I had to leave my position after the birth of my son, whom was born with severe problems. After his birth, I became extremely depressed and like so many others, when nothing else worked I resorted to self medicating. It didn't help that drs were prescribing pain killers left and right after the birth for my c-section recovery, I quickly began to notice the pills were curing a lot more than the physical scar. Anyway, that's been four years ago and it's been all down hill from there. I've always declared myself a strong person, so I have no idea how I let this get the upper hand, but it did, very quickly. Well, it started slow, but the last two years it has gotten out of control. In February I began getting treatment at a local facility for suboxone therapy. I have been taking it ever since. I take half a pill a day, every day, and I do pretty well on it. I'm normal again, maybe not completely, but much more normal than I was obsessing on how to get my next drop, it was horrible. My biggest complaint with suboxone is the smoking. I quit smoking several years ago and now, I smoke constantly again, it's horrible, I beat myself up about it day and night. I literally cannot sleep at night due to the fear of dying from lung cancer or emphasima, sometimes I imagine I probably already have it, and just condemn myself. It's terrible. Why does this drug cause you to want to smoke? Normally, I can quit at the drop of a hat, but I cannot quit smoking while taking suboxone, I've tried ten times all failures. Has anyone had this problem? Or has anyone managed to quit smoking while taking suboxone? I'd love to hear how you did it.
Anyway, I'm currently thinking of trying to taper off, but I don't know if I"m ready? How will I know? I don't know if I mentioned it, forgive me if I have, but I am no longer in treatment, I couldn't afford to continue, I have about two bottles left so it is the inevitable, I will have to quit, which stinks, would have been nice if I could have stayed on to I felt ready.
I am a little ready, I'm tired of the smoking and my face breaks out like it did when I was in highschool, and I'm 34 years old! Does anyone else have this problem?
Thanks for any suggestions.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 25, 2009 1:07 am 
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Hi jlphilips24, welcome to the forum.

I haven't experienced any desire to smoke since I've been on Suboxone. In fact, I was smoking before - but only infrequently - and now I don't smoke at all. But that's not to say that it doesn't make other people want to smoke. I think I've heard others say that it does. Why, I have no idea.

I'm sorry you can't afford treatment any more. Ideally, you would taper off when you feel comfortable doing so - when you know you are ready. Since you will have to stop when you run out of medication, I will tell you what I would do in your situation.

First, I would taper down to 2mgs as quickly as you comfortably can do it. I don't know what dose you are on, but whatever it is, 2mgs is still a very effective dose of Suboxone. It's a strong drug. If you are on 8mgs or more, you should be able to get down to 4mgs fairly easily. Then reduce down to 2mgs in whatever increments seem doable, and give yourself time to stabilize between doses.

The taper down from 2mgs to 0 is the harder part, but it's doable. I have a thread in Stopping Suboxone about a liquid taper method that I've been using with good results. I'm now on .3 mgs (that's like 1/26 of an 8mg pill. I made 3mgs of Sub last me for 10 days) and doing great. Anyone can do it - in fact, I think a couple of other members are using this method now as well.

If you don't want to do that, then you just have to break the pills as small as you can. The idea is to go slowly with very small decreases to avoid withdrawal symptoms AND to give your brain a chance to adjust to life with no medication.

Best of luck, see you around the forum.

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 25, 2009 8:21 am 
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Hi and Welcome,

I do smoke allot, but I always have. Face break outs, yup- to me this is minor. For you and the amount of pills you admit to taking per day, you have a wonderful chance of successfully tapering off Suboxone and moving on with your life. If you think you are able to taper, then do it ASAP, since you have only a certain amount of medication left.
Counseling is extremely important,or a support group. We have online support meetings here on Monday and Wednesday in our CHAT module from 7:30pm to 9PM (EST). If you cannot afford a counselor, it is a great way to get support from our other members and staff.Talking about what you are going through does help a great deal!

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 Post subject: Smoking and Subx
PostPosted: Fri Aug 14, 2009 4:09 pm 
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Howdy and Welcome. I have been taking Suboxone for over a month and my smoking has increased to 2 packs a day. Never had I smoked this much and I wonder why? I am trying to be truthful to myself and when I look back on all the times I smoked this heavily was when I was drinking or taking pills. It also might be an anxiety thing. When you mentioned that you cant sleep sometimes because of the fear of a lung illness sounds ultra familiar to me. I did the same thing last night and the night before. I decided that I can take control of this by letting it go and understand that the only thing I have control of in this world are my decisions. You may want to get a small candy dish and keep it near you and put some of those butterscotch hard candies in it (or whatever you like) to replace that moments cigarette. That's what I've done and it helps to a degree. Sometimes you may wanna just have an unlit cig in your hand. The mind games one has to play... lol. We both know our smoking is out of control, let's do something about it. Take care and God bless. -Andy

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 Post subject: nicotine and suboxonre
PostPosted: Fri Aug 14, 2009 9:05 pm 
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Hello everyone,

I have a nasty habit too, and its chewing tobbacco. I am currently trying to taper off suboxone. Anyways I have stopped suboxone a couple of times over the last four years, and when I did I quit chewing tobacco. When I started back the suboxone treatment I automatically started chewing again. I do crave nicotine when taking Suboxone. I understand your worry about Cancer.

Thanks,
Baron :?


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 15, 2009 11:00 am 
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Welcome to the site :)
I wanted to share how I've been able to quit smoking for almost 3 months now even though I'm still on Suboxone. I tried everything before: gum, patches, cold turkey, Chantix (smoking cessation med), etc. I'd tried more times than I can remember to quit and time and time again I ended up smoking again. Finally after wanting to try another med to help me quit but not having insurance that covers anti-smoking meds I opted for the cheaper of the two: Zyban (Bupropion SR). I was taking it for a little over a week when I quit and haven't smoked since :) It did take me really wanting to quit but it really has made quitting easy. I really didn't think I'd ever quit, honestly thought I'd end up dying from lung cancer or some other smoking related illness. I've even been able to start jogging since I quit and I can actually breath again !!! Please don't stop trying to quit it is possible :) I'm still kind of in disbelief that I quit and now I don't even want to smoke and I've got alot more money in my pocket from not spending $5 a day to likely eventually kill myself. The important thing for me was to not stop trying. If you really have the desire to quit and you haven't tried Chantix or Zyban I'd suggest talking to your Dr. about whether or not he thinks it'd be a good idea. I know though for a fact that if I was able to quit then ANYONE can :)

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 15, 2009 12:32 pm 
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Hmm...It's funny you should mention that Matt. I also take bupropion, but for depression. Perhaps that influenced my ability to quit smoking and stay quit this time.

I smoked from age 13 to 29 when I got pregnant. I quit, then picked it up again after my daughter was 2 or so - when I went back to school. My partner had quit for the most part too, and since we had a kid we didn't allow smoking in the house or in the car. Living in a place where it's cold and rainy 9 months of the year doesn't make it real appealing to go outside and smoke all the time.

Anyway, I was a "sympathetic smoker" off and on for the next few years. I'd go months without smoking, then go to a bar and end up smoking all night. Then Washington outlawed smoking in bars. Then I just would bum one off a friend now and then. After I started Suboxone, I noticed I bummed them less and less and when I did I wouldn't want to finish it. Then I just stopped, and that's that.

I guess the moral of this story is keep trying to quit. I tried a lot of times to quit and finally it just stuck.

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