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PostPosted: Sun May 11, 2014 12:24 pm 
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Hello everyone! It's been just over 6 months since I've been off Suboxone now and I wanted to report in. I feel bad because I don't come on here as much as I would like, so I'm going to work on that.

It's amazing to see how time flies and how fast 6 months goes. It's amazing to think that over a year and a half ago I was still on my daily Suboxone dose of 8mg, which I was on for 4 years prior.

Well last year around this time (March 2013) I decided I wanted to be done with Suboxone. I, like many others on here, am forever indebted to Suboxone for getting me off Oxy's and stabilizing my life. With Suboxone, I was able to get a job, keep it, start relationships and get meaning to my life. At the very beginning, I planned to be on Suboxone for 1 year, even though my doctor said it could be a lifetime maintenance drug. I never had any intention of making it a lifetime maintenance drug. I also never had any intention of being on Suboxone for 4 years, but that happened. The decision to finally convince myself to taper off Suboxone was one of the best decisions of my life.

Even though I've been off for 6 months, I still cherish the fact that I don't depend on a dose of Suboxone to feel good, let alone, function properly. I cherish the fact that I can take trips away from home without worrying about how many doses I need or what would happen if I ran out while on the road. I cherish not having to pay the medical bills every month to a doctor that encourages me to stay on longer. I cherish the feeling of having a healthy sex life without Suboxone holding me down. I cherish the fact that I can be normal and stable around family and friends. The list can go on and on, but it comes down to being able to live your life without anything holding you back.

I encourage those out there that have been on Suboxone for an extended period of time, that have a support system in place, and a mind ready to move on, to step out of the Suboxone routine and work on reducing your doses. I know everyone is different, but if you feel you're ready to take the next step to get off Suboxone, don't be fearful. It is intimidating, but take it from me and everyone else that has gotten off Suboxone, it's one of the best decisions made in life. You'll be shocked at how you feel at 8mg as well as 2mg. The lower you go and allow your body to adjust, the closer you are to getting off.

Other than that, I still feel as good as I did 3 months and 1 month off. I tapered so low, the time it took me to feel normal after jumping was very minimal. I put in a lot of work into my taper to make withdrawals minimal and it worked for me.

Well that's my 6 month update and I hope others out there do what's right for them. It worked for me, it can work for you.

Also, here is my previous thread for reference: http://www.suboxforum.com/made-25mg-jumping-thanksgiving-t9260.html

Take care,


RXFCG

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Start tapering your SUBOXONE doses more effectively and accurately with the RX FILM CUTTING GUIDE! http://www.rxfilmcuttingguide.com


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PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2014 8:18 am 
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This is great to read. Thank you!!!


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PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2014 11:15 pm 
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Hey man. I'm glad to see your doing so well. You've successfully managed to overcome addiction, keep your head up high. I'm happy for you. god bless

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PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2014 6:38 pm 
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Thanks guys, I appreciate the feedback. Hope I read your post and know it can be tough to get through those craving stages after you jump. Stay strong and fight through it just like the other members have mentioned.

I would recommend getting a hobby to keep your brain active. I've always enjoyed adrenaline based hobbies because it gives me a rush. Hell, try skydiving, jumping out of an airplane will keep your mind off opiates. That could be an expensive hobby though. There are others.

Either way, stay busy and speak to others about what your feeling.

Take care,


RXFCG

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Start tapering your SUBOXONE doses more effectively and accurately with the RX FILM CUTTING GUIDE! http://www.rxfilmcuttingguide.com


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 17, 2014 7:59 pm 
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I am so glad to hear that your sex life is back to normal. Thank you for posting your thoughts, it really helps those of us who are on the other side watching this with raw emotion.


Last edited by Debbierdmn0810 on Thu Jun 19, 2014 2:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 18, 2014 6:44 pm 
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rx...THANKS SO MUCH for taking the time to stop in and post. My taper plan is the same as yours...taper down to the lowest dose I can cut, stay there a bit, and then start skipping days until I take that final dose.
It is just so encouraging to read upbeat, positive posts from those who have successfully jumped. I am so happy and proud for you and cannot wait until I can write my first post to others about the joy of freedom from Subs.

Congratulations!

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1.1.15 - 8 mg/day
1.24.15 - 6 mgs/day
3.6.15 - 4 mg/day
3.22.15 - 3 mg/day
5.3.15- 2 mg/day
5.17.15 - 1.5 mg/day
5.29.15 - 1 mg/day
6.16.15 - .8 mg/day
12.18.15 - 4 mg
12.28.15 - 2 mg
1.10.16 - 1.5 mg
1.21.16 - 1 mg


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 19, 2014 10:16 pm 
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Hey Glad there is others out there going through the same kind of issues. I got off my last dose of bupe Dec 25, 2013 which puts me right with you at six months (high five to us). I can fall asleep on my own again, but instead of waking up at noon I wake up at 6am. Which is all the sleep my body actually requires, any more is unhealthy. Im 29 and also glad to not feel impotent and so is my wife. Its amazing how much it changes and effects your personality and body in a variety of ways. Im able to enjoy things again without drugs but its not always easy as anhedonia still exists and I have to face my waves of depression, anxiety, cravings the all natural way.... will power. Will power is something I credit my personal recovery with, not a higher power or any step they tried to tell me I had a disease. I think its a mental decision more then physical disease. Everybody on earth is an addict, we all crave dopamine. Its just the few of us that take things to the extreme. If I just remember how little I felt good and how much the bad outweighed the good with opiates especially dilaudid, that is key main factor in keeping me straight i.e. will power. If anybody out there is on the fence about stopping dig deep and do it because its worth it. Nothing is as easy as it seems. Don't buy into the whole long term suboxone because you feel you have a disease because if you really believe that you have already given up. Stay strong and don't let your dreams be dreams, make shit happen. Peace and much love


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 19, 2014 11:14 pm 
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 19, 2014 11:50 pm 
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markynfunkybunch wrote:
Hey Glad there is others out there going through the same kind of issues. I got off my last dose of bupe Dec 25, 2013 which puts me right with you at six months (high five to us). I can fall asleep on my own again, but instead of waking up at noon I wake up at 6am. Which is all the sleep my body actually requires, any more is unhealthy. Im 29 and also glad to not feel impotent and so is my wife. Its amazing how much it changes and effects your personality and body in a variety of ways. Im able to enjoy things again without drugs but its not always easy as anhedonia still exists and I have to face my waves of depression, anxiety, cravings the all natural way.... will power. Will power is something I credit my personal recovery with, not a higher power or any step they tried to tell me I had a disease. I think its a mental decision more then physical disease. Everybody on earth is an addict, we all crave dopamine. Its just the few of us that take things to the extreme. If I just remember how little I felt good and how much the bad outweighed the good with opiates especially dilaudid, that is key main factor in keeping me straight i.e. will power. If anybody out there is on the fence about stopping dig deep and do it because its worth it. Nothing is as easy as it seems. Don't buy into the whole long term suboxone because you feel you have a disease because if you really believe that you have already given up. Stay strong and don't let your dreams be dreams, make shit happen. Peace and much love


I've always been on the fence about it being a genetic disease vs something one acquires on their own. Last time I checked (which was admittedly awhile ago), the genetic studies were limited mostly to separated identical twins who became alcoholic independently. I need more than that to confidently say its a fact, rather than a theory as such. I have an atheist friend who made up her mind to stop using benzos and alcohol cold turkey (much rougher than opiates!), and hates 12 Step meetings, and has been sober and clean over a year now, and doing great. I like meetings for the fellowship aspect primarily, even though I'm not fanatical about the higher power aspect of the program (by fanatical, I mean I get really turned off when somebody tells me, "find God, or you will die from this disease!"), I'm probably more of an agnostic than anything.. meaning, I don't believe it's possible to prove that God exists, it takes a leap of faith, but still have some reasonable doubt either way (regardless of the rules of logic, which puts the burden of proof on the believer) pertaining to the great mystery, in that something, perhaps a prime mover, creative force, etc., might have set things into motion, and find myself even praying at times; maybe because of social conditioning, or maybe many of us are hardwired that way. *shrugs* Whatever works best for any individual is what works best for them, so I try not to dog any approach to abstinence.

Anyway, that's enough of my controversial 2 cents. Thanks for checking in! It's always encouraging to hear about people putting some distance between themselves and their drug(s) of choice, and eventually subs, if/when they reach that point.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2014 7:50 am 
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This positive post was exactly what I needed to hear this morning. I am working my way down a taper, at 1.5 mg now, and I see the end in sight, but whew, the emotions that come with this were unexpected. I have a lot of issues waking up which were lulled into sub-mission over the past several years. They're baaack!

I know this will pass. I will share here that the suboxone cutting guide has been a lifesaver for me, as is having a community of people who are walking down the same path I am. I am agnostic on 12 step meetings, I think everyone has to find someplace to get support, a place that works for the individual. If 12 steps works for you great, some of it has worked for me. I think conscious contact with a power greater than myself has given me a lot of strength. Don't get hung up on labels, just find what works for you and work that.

The "cardio-cure" is very helpful, doing even 15 minutes of hard thumping cardio on an eliptical, or running or dancing even will change mood and help the body to make it's own endorphins as well as be able to accept them. I know this is one of the pillars of recovery from suboxone for me.

The second revelation I've had is juicing. I am a vegetarian so I live on vegetables and tofu anyway, but my Ninja blender has made it possible for me to get nutrients I'm frankly not hungry enough to put in my body otherwise. I'm not unhappy about my loss of appetite, I had gained 30 lbs over the time I was on 16 mgs of Suboxone. As I lowered down to 4mg I was able to lose most of the weight by doing a lot of cardio. Anyway I make myself a strawberry yogurt drink for bfast and then get in a green juice with kale, spinach, celery, ginger, apple and pineapple, it's so good and goes down easy like a milkshake. I'm not saying that juicing is going to help withdrawals, I have no evidence of that, but I do feel better and stronger, so I'm going to keep up my juice drinks and healthy living while I slowly taper the rest of the way down.

When I start feeling sketchy, overly emotional, restless, angry at myself etc I need something bigger than me to go to. I find that listening to and reading spiritual text has a calming effect. Even the PBS documentary on the story of the life of Buddah (which is called The Buddah on youtube) calms me down. I listen to it on headphones at night to get myself to sleep. It doesn't matter what spiritual path appeals to you as long as you find one that fits.

There's no one size fits all path. At the very first meeting I went to I remember somebody saying "take what you need and leave the rest" that was excellent advice. It applies to every tool for recovery that exists, I think we need to go to the tools open minded and ready to find what works for us, to keep our center calm. The alternative is going back to a life of misery, and I doubt anyone who has gotten here wants to go back. Life on Opiates has no appeal to me today, all I remember is how sick and miserable I was when I was ready to get off of them.

So thank you or sharing a positive story of taper and staying clean. Life is messy. Real life comes rushing back in the door, and those of us who have been on Suboxone may not realize how much real life we were numb to. We need a strategy and tools to make it through until our new normal becomes normal.

I am extremely grateful to the people who are coming back here and posting after they are off Suboxone,we need to hear their stories and learn from them if we are to be successful as well. When I was isolated and trying to do this without support, it did not go well. This is a whole different experience, and I know I am going to come through it and be present for others.

Thank you so much for sharing your experience and for the sub cutting guide, you rock!

Gingerpop

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