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PostPosted: Fri Jan 30, 2015 5:12 pm 
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So,
Long story short I suffer from severe anxiety, bipolar, depression, insomnia and ocd. I've been on suboxone for about 3yrs and used opiates for many years before. I want to get off the subs so that I can focus on treating my anxiety and other issues. My doctor, and most the doctors in my area refuse to prescribe benzos to someone on suboxone. I was forced to stop taking klonopin when I tested positive for THC in my urine (this was pre-addiction). After I went off klonopin & other meds for add my life got so messed up. I really didn't want to live anymore and started doing heroin and opiates to get by. I'm now on suboxone and I haven't used anything in years, but I'm still severely depressed and crippled with anxiety.
I've been waiting to see a doctor who has agreed to help me detox and help treat my anxiety. But I'm worried that I won't be able to see her soon enough (I've been waiting 2months for an opening). The suboxone makes my anxiety/depression so much worse, and it makes me feel nauseous every time I take it.

I'm considering going to an inpatient facility for anxiety/depression/insomnia. I'm afraid that since im labeled as a drug addict, I won't get the proper treatment I need. I've tried everything under the sun for anxiety/insomnia/depression/ocd, the only thing that ever helped was klonopin, vyvanse and ambien. I want to detox off the subs, but I can't deal with my anxiety right now, I'm terrified of how I'll feel being in withdrawals and having major anxiety.

I'm at the point where I can't leave my house and I'm basically sitting around waiting for time to pass dreading every second I'm conscious. I don't sleep so I can't even get a break from being awake and feeling this way. I have major anxiety when I'm around people, and going to a place full of strangers where I have no control over my treatment seems like my worst nightmare.

If I don't do something drastic to help myself, I don't know where I'll end up. Using again is not what I want to do, but my life is torture right now and it seems better to use again then to end up hurting myself.

Has anyone had any experience with inpatient treatment for anxiety, depression and detox from suboxone? I'm willing to try it, but I can't get off the subs without getting some type of help for anxiety.

Please, any input helps. I'm at the end of my rope here.

-daze


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 01, 2015 3:00 pm 
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You are most likely to get benzos from an older doc who is overworked, who just wants to get people out of his/her office. You will need to find a real fool, if you want to be prescribed benzos combined with Vyvanse (which is a precursor for Dexedrine). The two medications are exact opposites to each other; Vyvanse increases attention and clonazepam decreases attention; Vyvanse increases sympathetic tone and benzos decrease the same; Vyvanse is a CNS 'upper', and benzos are 'downers', etc. None of this has anything to do with buprenorphine--- although a doc has to be even more foolish to prescribe in such a nonsensical manner in a patient whose care may be audited.

I suspect you have tons of reasons why the combination works for you. You probably think that comments about 'what is good for you' are patronizing. But in reality, the combination of stimulants and benzos makes no sense. We also know that complete tolerance develops to the actions of benzos at GABA receptors, so even if there were some benefit from their action, there is no way to get it without constant dose escalation-- which is not a reasonable option.

When I wrote 'the things I hate about benzos' a number of years ago ( http://suboxonetalkzone.com/the-problem-with-benzodiazepines/ ) I received many, many emails from docs around the country, who said that they saw the exact same phenomenon in their patients. People who are emotionally attached to benzos can't see it-- but your current longing for a life with benzos and stimulants, and inability to function without them, shows that you never should have had them in the first place.

Many people on this site have been through their own benzo problems, which is one reason your post isn't getting a pile of responses.

Understand that you are getting a free opinion-- one that I know most good doctors agree with. I won't read or respond to a debate, because I'm not seeking an opinion on the issue. I'm just trying to help you align your interests with the reality of the world you are facing.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 02, 2015 12:04 am 
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Suboxdoc,
I worded that a little wrong, I was prescribed klonopin, vyvanse and ambien all at separate times. Not at the same time. The klonopin was the first thing that helped when my anxiety was really severe, but over time my therapist thought that treating my add may help my anxiety too. I went off the klonopin and went onto adderall, then months later vyvanse because I thought I'd try something that was less associated with abuse. But treating my ADD with adderall and vyvanse (a very low dose) helped a lot with social anxiety and even helped me sleep better and feel calm, which I rarely ever do. Once I failed a urine screening for THC (which I shouldn't have done, but it really helps me eat and helps stomach pain from ulcers) I was taken off of vyvanse and for over 2yrs tried different antidepressants and mood stabilizers. And ended up on clonidine, ambien and luvox. Along with ulcer meds.

I don't want a doctor to prescribe me essentially downers and speed. I just need help with my anxiety while I'm withdrawing from suboxone. Then once I'm free of the stuff maybe I can try to start treating my other issues again.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 02, 2015 6:56 pm 
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Fortunately, many addicts are getting help with suboxone; however, many of those same addicts are not (IMO) doing the other things they need to do to recover from this disease of addiction. I have been on suboxone for 15 months now, and I am in a recovery group (not a 12-step program). When I was at the end of my rope, I checked into Memorial Hermann in-patient recovery center for 30 days. This was my first time learning what RECOVERY was, and my first time exposed to AA/NA/ and CA. That 30 days saved my life...for awhile, but even after going to meetings for 90 days, having a sponser, and working the steps, I relapsed, multiple times. I was in and out of 30 day programs for the next year, and finally ended up homeless, and got into a 9, yes NINE month in-patient program in Houston. This saved my life for about 2 years, then when everything was going well (I had 2 jobs), and money was coming in, so like the "good addict" I was, I thought I deserved a celebration. I relapsed, which started a free-fall.

Friend of mine got me to my current suboxone doctor, and for me, this was the game changer. I have been clean and sober for 15 months, not even craving anything else. I am in therapy individually, and group. The suboxone helped stabilize my cravings, helped immensely with my depression issues, but it was the THERAPY, and working on myself that has led me to a new life. In-patient may be a good choice for you, but you have to take action, and work on yourself. The medication helps, and gives me an advantage, but in my opinion, addicts have to work on the underlying reasons for why we use. My life is great now...that's an understatement if you knew me 15 years ago, and met me today. Help is out there, but you have to do some work, if you feel you need to be off suboxone, then great, but PLEASE get some help from therapy, it worked for me.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 03, 2015 12:19 am 
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Todd,
Thanks for telling me your story about your experience with an inpatient facility. I do see a therapist and have for many years before I began using. I totally agree 100% that you can't overcome addiction without dealing with the issues that led you there. For me that was years of trying to treat my depression, anxiety, insomnia and bipolar with very little improvement. I was really tired of wasting my life being miserable, even though I was really trying my hardest to work on myself and do everything I could to want to live. The anxiety, depression, insomnia etc. I felt along with years of trying to make a difference definitely led me to use.

I wish I could say the suboxone has helped with my depression and anxiety, as I've heard it has for many people, but that's not the case. If anything it makes everything worse and makes me feel even more trapped.

I am on a waiting list to get into an inpatient program, but I may not be able to get in before my insurance runs up. And I cant afford it on my own. I've been on suboxone over 3yrs and haven't used for 3yrs, which is something to be proud of. But I just still feel like an addict on suboxone, even though I don't get high off it, I'm dependent on it. It helped me get off heroin & opiates and I think its a better alternative to using those drugs.

I've been homeless, lived in a tent for almost a year in the north east. So I'd rather take the chance of being miserable in a recovery center than using again and living in my car. But I freaking panic when I'm around just about anyone, even my best friend. I just get so anxious around people, so I'm afraid I'm gonna be in constant panic mode in a place full of strangers. I guess I'll see how it goes.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 03, 2015 10:55 am 
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Read your post first thing when I got into work, and I sincerely feel for you. In the midst of my addiction, I suffered through depression as well, and ran the gambit on medication, until finally my doctor put me on Prozac, which just helped enough without side effects to take the serious anxiety away. After going through inpatient treatment (30 days, plus another 45 intensive out patient), I realized a lot of my depression was from the fact that the drugs were no longer getting me high, they were just maintenance so I wouldn't get sick. My anxiety slowly went away, as I was probably just scared to be around people in social situations without being on any drugs. I know I really only felt comfortable going out, or doing family functions if I was loaded. After getting clean, and working on myself, I started to be ok with gatherings, socially, and some of that came through self-confidence, and a lot of it came via support from my therapy group.

I am glad to hear that you have been in therapy. I don't believe we as addicts truly understand how much damage we caused to ourselves. It takes years of work to get back to "normal", and that's the problem I've seen for so many people, they get 30, 60 days, and stop "working" on themselves, and don't realize that you have to keep pushing forward to heal, physically, emotionally, and spiritually. Insurance companies obviously are trying to make money, so they give us the least amount of time as possible to be covered in treatment. They don't want to accept the fact that lifelong addicts need a lot of time in therapy to even have a chance.

I'll check back with you later, gotta do some work.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 04, 2015 1:29 pm 
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Todd,
It really means a lot that you took the time to read through my rants, and give me some really good advice and info. It helps a lot to know that you suffered through a similar situation and eventually got to a better place.
Prozac has helped my sister immensely. She still has bad days where she's anxious, but she's able to leave the house now. She couldn't for over a year and she's only 19. I tried Prozac after seeing how much it helped her, and I unfortunately didn't get much relief.
My biggest fear is going back to how I felt before I ever used drugs. I know that is what most people strive for, to get back to who they were before they used. But that was the most unhappy I've ever been. I had resigned myself to the fact that I'd eventually take my own life, so I really had no hope of ever feeling better.

I saw a therapist for the first time in 6th grade when I started having severe anxiety. I'm 26 now, and I just wish I could say I was somewhat happy before I started using drugs. But that's just not true.
That's not to say that I don't think I'll ever be happy being sober, its just harder for me to imagine because I've basically always felt the way I do now.

My mom is a recovering alcoholic and she has been sober for over 13yrs. But she still struggles with wanting to drink, and has to work everyday to be sober. Alcohol is everywhere, you can't exactly cut yourself off from everyone you know who drinks. Personally I hate alcohol because of the way people treat it, cuz its legal. To me, its one of the deadliest drugs out there.
Anyways, I realize through watching my mom get sober that its a life long struggle. 30, 60, 90 days of treatment isn't enough to get anyone completely healed. It really takes all you've got.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 04, 2015 2:24 pm 
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What a coincidence, I was just looking over the forum now, and saw you're post. I can't complain about my childhood, or blame that, my parents hassled me, but overall they are great. I'm 42 now, and I popped a couple wine coolers and some beer in my teens, but I played basketball in school, so never really partied until I was about 24. Started working in a restaurant as a bartender, and things went downhill FAST. My ex-wife, who I'm great friends with, says things like, "I'd like to see you back to your old self". Since I've been on the subs, I can't tell you how many times she's said that I look like my old self, "I can see it in your eyes", is what she tells me. I definitely used at first because I loved the way the pills made me feel, but shortly after the fun was gone, I was telling myself I needed anything to stop feeling the way I felt. Low self-esteem killed me, and I was successful at work, was married with a HOT wife, and 4 kids...but I couldn't figure out how to get in a good place.

You're extremely young, and unfortunately, I've seen this disease take a few of my friends earlier than I think they should've left this world. Individual counseling, and group therapy worked wonders, along with the suboxone of course, but the thing that really did it for me was getting back into church, and finding a great group of men that I found counsel with. Not everyone likes to hear or talk about church, but I'm just relating to others what works for me, and the results are obvious.

It's great to hear that you're in therapy, I'm sad to hear that it isn't getting the results for you (from what I'm reading in your posts). I've been there though, frozen with fear, sitting in bed, watching the clock slowly go by, just trying to get through the next minute. I had to get honest with my parents, my ex, and my kids about my use, and what I was feeling/going through. I used to cover up the shame and guilt of letting everyone down, and then when I had "good" days, I used to celebrate. I can only suggest that you find someone you trust to talk to about everything, and let it go. I don't know your situation, so I'm only speculating, and giving you advice about how I made it through, and how I found out how to be good with myself (not just OK, just getting by is good in the beginning, but I'm seriously very happy with life now). The ex, and I are even seriously talking about re-marrying :).

If you were in Houston, man I'd sit down with you, but we do have the internet to help people thankfully. Not sure what else to tell you, except hang in there, it CAN get better, we just have to work on it to get there. Life is easier for some people, but I wouldn't trade anything I've gone through in the past x number of years to get where I am today. I appreciate my life, my family, and enjoy the opportunities that come my way.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 05, 2015 11:35 am 
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day to daze, how are you doing? Just checking to see if you made any progress.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 05, 2015 5:08 pm 
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Todd,
I'm getting by, I've been taking less suboxone and I've actually felt a little bit better. Still anxious and not sleeping well, but my stomach hasn't been as upset.

I have to say that my family is absolutely great, and I could not get by without them. I'm living at home with my whole family right now; mom, dad and my younger brother and sister. It's been a huge weight off my chest to be able to tell them I'm on suboxone and recovering from a serious drug addiction. I know they had an idea of what was going on, but I didn't come out and tell them until I went on suboxone. They've all been really understanding and support me as much as they can. I really can't keep anything from them, so it was just a matter of time before they knew just about every horrible thing I've ever done. I thought it would be hard for them to understand how I wasn't getting fucked up from my suboxone. But I think they get it now.

Things have been rough watching my family struggling, but we are all there for each other as much as possible. So I definitely have the support of my family, whether I choose to stay on suboxone or get off it.

Thanks so much for replying and checking back in with me. It really means so much, even to have the support of a total stranger. I'm not a religious person, but you can talk about church all you want to me. I'm totally open to hearing anything that has helped you or set you back. The fact that you & your ex are talking about re-marrying seems like a pretty good indicator that your getting back to where you want to be in life. Whether it works out that way or not, its a huge milestone that people who knew you before, can see the old you again.
It sounds like you are doing great, and I hope it only gets better. I really believe that going through struggles in your life makes you a deeper and more empathetic person. I can't say I'm glad for everything I've put myself through, but it has made me who I am. And although I may not sound like a confident person, I really have come a long way as far as loving myself.

I haven't made much progress in the past few days, but I'm at least starting to feel somewhat better.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 06, 2015 2:15 pm 
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DaytoDaze, I really hope you're doing better, I think it's been a week since your original post (maybe more). I know you said you were on a list for an inpatient facility, any word on that? It's really a blessing that you have your family around. Most of us long term addicts have burned those bridges, and some relationships we were fortunate to get back, but some people believe we will never change, or get better. I also wanted to mention that my doctor recommended Kratom capsules, which I tried, and they seemed to give me a little more energy, and helped with some anxiety. Kratom impacts people differently, again, I just share my own experiences.

I'm sure you know it's not good to isolate, especially if you are depressed, so I hope you can hang around/out with your family. I know when we are alone, our dysfunctional brains kick in and tell us stupid things (at least mine did). I'm not sure if you've ever been to an AA meeting, but that may be something you could look into. When I was first exposed to "recovery", AA/CA/NA were part of our daily routine, and luckily we had a good group at the hospital I was at. When I searched for meetings on my own, I had to try 5 or 6 different ones, until I found one I could relate to, and feel comfortable around. Even if you haven't gone to a meeting before, or if you did, and hated it, it sounds like you need some uplifting, positive motivational talk to listen to. You may or may not get this from AA meetings, but I always LOVED to go on Friday or Saturday night when they had "speaker" meetings. Usually, the whole hour was one person sharing their story in front of the group, and usually there was no sharing from anyone else. I always left those speaker meetings feeling uplifted, and motivated.

Anyway, I'll keep checking in on you, and I'll pray that things get better.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 13, 2015 6:25 pm 
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Hey Todd,
Sorry it's been a while since I replied, but I've had a crazy week.
I did however hear back from a facility and I found out my insurance will cover most of it. My major issue right now is that I only have until the end of March to go to a facility. If I'm going to detox off suboxone while I'm there I would really like to be able to taper slowly from where I am right now. I was doing good tapering down, I'm prescribed 2 8mg tablets a day, so 16mg. But I had gone down to 8mg and then down to 4mg over like 2 months. For me going down from 16 to 8 wasn't bad, 8 to 4 was a little worse, but once I started going down from 4mg to 3.5 or 3mg I started feeling more anxious and wasn't sleeping at all. So I ended up going back to 4mg and I've been taking 8mg some days. I know I can taper down again, but I don't have as much time as I'd like to slowly taper before I go to an inpatient program and end up going without suboxone completely.
I've heard from a few different people who have been to an inpatient place and they weren't able to taper off their suboxone. Or if they were able to, the doctors felt that tapering below 4mg or 2mg was pointless. I think it helped the withdrawal be less intense when I tapered years ago. I went down to like half a milligram.

Anyways, I guess I'm wondering what it would be like to detox from suboxone in an inpatient hospital. I'm sure its different than if someone was detoxing from heroin.

Also, one of the main reasons I want to go to this facility is to get a handle on my anxiety, insomnia and other issues that I haven't been able to deal with in an out patient setting. Do you think if I went there primarily for mental issues and not addiction that I'd still be able to take my prescribed suboxone? Ideally I'd like to have the time to wean to a dose that I can more comfortably jump from.
I will have insurance after march, it just won't be as good. That's why I need to do the inpatient place before the end of march. So I have a few weeks to wean down. And I'll be able to follow up with after care once I'm out of the facility. So I'll be able to see a therapist still.

Still, I guess I'm just not sure how they'd treat someone in suboxone withdrawal as opposed to someone in opiate or heroin withdrawal. Or if I wouldn't receive the treatment I need for anxiety, depression and insomnia if I went in there for rehab purposes. They do a dual diagnosis treatment plan, so hopefully I'll be able to get help for my addiction and for the underlying mental issues that led me to use in the first place.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 13, 2015 7:10 pm 
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Checking the forum before I leave work for the day. First, glad to hear that you're doing okay. If you read a lot of the posts on this site, you'll see that some people have minimal issues with coming off subs, and others really have a hard time once down to 2mg or less. I went to a drug rehab inpatient facility, but almost everyone was "dual-diagnosed" (drugs or alcohol/depression and/or anxiety). I know in my experience, I suffered from depression, some from coming off drugs after 15 years and not knowing who/what I was going to do or be, really scared me. I was so used to doing everything high, that I had to really figure out what "normal" was for me. IMO, most addicts suffer from depression, partly b/c we get to a point where our DOC doesn't work how we'd like, and all the damage we do to those around us and ourselves can be devastating (which leads to depression). I'm just relaying my thoughts and experience, as I am neither a doctor or psychologist.

To answer your question, I would say you'd have to talk to the facility to see what they recommend (ask if you can take your subs while in treatment). It depends on what you tell them, and if they are open to MAT (medical assisted treatment). If you are an addict, then I would say you need to decide if that's what you want treatment for, plus your anxiety, insomnia, and other mental issues. I think it largely depends on the facility, and what type of care they can provide. They are only going to be able to help you with the symptoms/issues you provide them with. You have to get honest, and real with yourself about what you want. It's awesome (truly) that you can go to a facility covered by insurance, b/c many people don't get the opportunity. At your young age, I'd grab hold of this chance to get help, and use it to your fullest. It sounds like you are doing a lot of good things in working towards a healthier lifestyle, but we both know it takes a lot of work on our part.

I was coming off a 40-50/day Norco habit mixed in with 20-25 somas/day, and thank God for medical detox. I had physical withdraw issues, but not nearly as bad as it could have been. I think they put a clonidine patch on me for a week, which helped a lot. I was put on mood stabilizers, well-butrin (which worked great for me with no side effects), and a couple other things for the first week I was inpatient. Detox is probably the scariest thing for an addict when trying to get off drugs, so getting assistance from a medical doctor should be a huge help. I will continue to pray for you, but please keep us updated on your progress.

Keep up the good work, know in your heart that you are doing something positive for yourself by seeking out help, and continue to lean on your family for support!!!


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 2015 12:41 am 
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Thanks Todd,

I think I've decided to wean down to as much as I can before I go to this facility. I've decided it's best for me to go and to detox from the suboxone since this is what I want. I've wanted to get off of it for a while, just haven't forced myself to knowing how much it will suck. I know that they do a medical assisted detox, so hopefully that will help me through the worst of it. This place is primarily a mental hospital, but they also have a rehab program where they treat underlying mental conditions. I'm hopeful that this is the right choice for me. And I'm very lucky to have this opportunity, that hasn't escaped me. I will also continue with outpatient treatment. I hope that I'll be able to see a therapist for the rest of my life. I've seen one since I was 13yrs old and I'm 26 now. I think it could benefit anyone to have access to therapy.

I'm curious as to what other medications they gave you for coming off of the norco's and Soma's? If you don't feel comfortable sharing don't. I'm currently prescribed clonidine for high blood pressure, ambien for insomnia and luvox for ocd/anxiety/depression. So I'm curious what other meds they could even give me for sleep and other symptoms associated with withdrawal.

Thanks for replying, for the advice & for the positive prayers and thoughts.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 17, 2015 3:02 pm 
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Make sure you bring a couple books to read while inpatient. Some places have you on a full schedule, till evening, but others don't have you participating in too many activities. Sounds like you're well versed in therapy, so bring a pen and notebook if they let you to do some journaling...this always helps me. I like to look at how I felt, and what I thought before therapy, and then afterwards. Plus it can be rewarding to look back at the deep hole you were in, once you are mentally healthy, and look back at how far you've come. Don't minimize your progress, as only you and your doctor/therapist know how far you've come. Others will see progress eventually, trust me.

As far as meds, I can't remember too many specific names, except for the clonidine patch, amtriphaline (can't spell it)- which made me sleep about 12-14 hours a day. They only gave me this for 3 days, as they said, I may as well sleep through the worst part of my detox. I was on a mood stabilizer pill for 2 weeks, then after 2 weeks, my doc didn't prescribe anything else except well-butrin.

Keep in mind, that everyone who goes to rehab, isn't there on their own volition, and so stay away from the negative people, if there are any, and use the time to focus on you. It's your time, and your dime, don't waste it. Not sure if you will have access to computers in your facility, but keep us updated if possible. If not, let us know approximately when you're going in, and coming out. If you don't want to post it, send me a message please. God bless you.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 19, 2015 11:54 pm 
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Thanks Todd,
I can't remember if this place has computers, but I'm hoping they do or they will let me bring my tablet. I'm sure that they will give me some medication I've never heard of and I rarely take something without researching it online first. So I'd be a little afraid to just take what the doctor is giving me without knowing what it is. But I guess we'll see. I will definitely be sure to let you know when I'm going.

Right now I'm a little torn because I just heard back from a doctor I've been waiting to see for months. She's a great doctor and her brother is an active addict so she understands addiction and has compassion regarding it. I saw her once and just speaking to her for 30 min made me feel so much more hopeful about getting off suboxone. I can't get in to see her until the end of march, but that gives me more time to wean down on my suboxone. I could still most likely go to the inpatient if I see this doctor and I'm still unable to get clean or get help. In the mean time I'd continue seeing my therapist and my suboxone doctor. But I've been having such a hard time lately that I can't imagine waiting another month feeling the way I have. I'm wondering if I'd be able to go into inpatient and wean down on my suboxone, but not come off it completely until I can see that doctor. Then I can detox at home where I'm somewhat more comfortable & less anxious. I guess I need to call them to figure it out.

Either way, I'm more hopeful. I got really down for a while & I still don't feel great. But I at least feel like I have some more options to help myself now. I've been trying to keep a journal or a record of how I've been feeling, but my thoughts are so scattered its hard to even explain how I feel.

I'll keep you updated on what happens. As always thanks for the positive thoughts, prayers and advice. :D


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 20, 2015 12:17 pm 
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Good for you, keep moving forward. Many times we have great thoughts, and aspirations, but we forget to take the action needed to get to our goals. I understand wanting to detox at home, in a more comfortable setting, but you can't beat being in a drug free environment, which is a rehab facility. I tried detoxing at home a couple times, doc gave me meds, worked for a couple days, but once the drugs were out of my system, I had no idea what to do, and no support system, or professionals around to help or ask questions. I'm not saying it's not doable, but safely detoxing in a medical environment with doctors available is a wise choice.

You're on the right path. As an addict, a lot of times my mind thinks the worst, or assumes too many things negative, I think our brains are wired differently than others (just my observation, and talks with other addicts). With that said, I have gotten into bad situations in the past, because I didn't ask questions. It sounds like you have spoke with someone at this inpatient facility, and if I were you, I'd call them again, and ask more questions. Lay out what your goals are, how you think you're treatment should go, and ask what options are available. Ask them specifically about the suboxone tapering. All you can do is ask questions, and put in your thoughts about recovery, and see what they come back with. On their end, they probably have a treatment system in place designed to broadly cover everyone, and they probably tweak it a little bit based on each individuals needs. See what the difference is between your treatment plan, and what they offer. If they can meet your needs (you're paying to go there, so ask for what you want, and see if they can accommodate you), then great, if not, then look into other options; but don't disregard this opportunity to get help in a safe environment.

I know that was a long winded answer, but my point was this: you'll only find out the answers to the questions you have if you ask someone specific questions at the facility. Nothing is too small, or irrelevant. Good luck, take care, and keep us informed!


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 01, 2015 11:19 pm 
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Hey Todd,

Sorry its been so long since I've replied. I've been busy lately. I'm still home, haven't gone to a facility. I'm still considering it, but I found out that I will be able to see the doctor I've been waiting months to see. I won't be able to see her until the end of the month, but its something to be hopeful about. She knows some of my history & she told me she was willing to help me taper off suboxone. With her help I'm going to come up with a plan & time frame for tapering and withdrawing. As well as a plan for aftercare, therapy & medication management.

I was getting really depressed and starting to lose faith in myself. But I've been able to pull myself out of it somewhat. Today is my birthday & usually I get really stressed about getting older & not having met goals I set. But today was a good day, I spent the day with my family and two of my close friends. Just lazing around my house and eating brownie sundaes. I'm hoping this year I will be able to start turning things around. Everyone would like a quick fix, but its never that easy.

I'll keep you updated as far as what I do, for now I'm just pushing forward & dealing with life as best as I can.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 01, 2015 11:41 pm 
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Well HAPPY BIRTHDAY DAZED!!!!
Hope this is a great year for you..hang in there....Razor


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 01, 2015 11:47 pm 
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hey Daze,
I didn't read all the posts, just your first one and a couple after.
My advice is this:
I have detoxed off of subs in an inpatient facility (rehab) 3 or 4 times.
The problem with a suboxone detox is that it dragggggs on and on. Heroin is over in like 7-10 days but if youve been on subs for a while then it takes forever. I remember coming into a facility having weaned down to 2 mgs a day. They gave me subs for another few days and then I stopped. When I left there a month later I was still feeling shitty (but definitely not as bad as the first 10 days). After the first 7 days I slowly started improving. 2 months off the subs and I felt 99% back to normal. I am talking physical symptoms. I suffer from mild depression and anxiety but not as sever as what you experience. Anyway my advice is this:
taper down as low as you can possibly go before you go in. Break up your meds into the doses you will take each day and do NOT break that schedule by taking more. Try to get down to 2 or 1 mg a day. Then go in and ride out the worst of it inpatient. Yes, it sucks in rehab and you have to go to groups and wake up early and they might not let you use a cell or ipad or anything but it also might save your life, or mean the difference btwn never getting off subs and actually making it.
I relapsed, but the clean time I did have (5 yrs, 2 yrs, 1 yr, 9 months) came from going inpatient.
I wish you all the best of luck my friend. Start going to NA or AA, get a sponsor, keep goin to therapy, get your confidence up, try to meet someone nice, maybe things'll start to look up. I dunno, but anyway, keep on fighting.

Edit: Just read your last post. Hope the doc assisted taper works for you. If you're able to stick to it then DO IT! It will be much more pleasant then being in a facility. The only problem is our (meaning us addicts) willpower. If you slip up and can't seem to actually finish the detox out in the world then please consider what I said about going inpatient. Take care and good luck.


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