It is currently Wed Aug 23, 2017 2:38 am



All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Our Sponsors





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 23 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2016 7:13 pm 
Offline
Average Poster
Average Poster

Joined: Mon Feb 15, 2016 6:38 pm
Posts: 4
My husband had an injury at work 2 years ago. His shoulder went out and his doctor prescribed him 5mg hydros, as we went through the process of getting X-rays and tests done on his shoulder (which lasted months of doctor visits and doctors telling us different things such as "it's a sprain" "it's a muscle tare") through all of these visits my husband was taking more and more hydros and in a short time his doctor perscribed him 10mg of hydros 120 count.(at this point he was taking 4-6 10mg a day) At this point he was beyond addicted. He then went to his doctor for help getting off the hydros and asked his doctor to taper him off. His doctor called him a liar and said he can't get addicted to hydros gave him 20 more pills and told him to get out and that "Mother Nature will take care of him" so we were all lost and my husband went deeper he got on poppy sead tea for a few months. My father in law and I told him enough. We were looking for viviyrol to give to him but couldn't find anywhere that gives it. So we went to Suboxone, my husbands first visit was at a horrible Suboxone doctor. The doctor told him he didn't need to be on Suboxone but if he gets on it he only needs 2mg of Suboxone. The doctor told him he was giving him 2mg of Suboxone. But the doctor ended up writing a perscription for 8mg Suboxone without our knowledge, At the time we couldn't read the film correctly and trusted that doctor in stupidity. My husband took the film and ever sense he has been hooked. He finally managed to taper to 5mg 7 months later.
We are now at the point where we are getting him off the Suboxone, our plan is for him to go the minimum days required without Suboxone on anything and then take the morphine pills and Xanax for 2-3 weeks that way when he goes into rehab he won't be withdrawing the whole time there. The half life of Suboxone for him is 25 days and it's out of his system we need to get to 3 weeks on something else then For him to finish up the withdraw in rehab and go to a 30 day program.

Sorry for such a long story. I just wanted to give some information. How long does he need to wait before he can take a Xanax? And before he can take a morphine pill?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2016 7:27 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member

Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2009 7:36 pm
Posts: 879
Location: Wisconsin
Welcome to the forum. Sadly similar things have happened to other people. You are not alone. It seems clear that you did some things without fuly researching and fully knowing the ramifications. I'm very concerned you are about to do the very same thing. Attempting to get off sub by taking Xanax and morphine is a very very bad idea! This will cause more problems than if will fix. It is not at all the way to go about this. I'm surprised a doctor will even prescribe this for your husband. Or are you buying these on the street. You are about to try to get off a manageable dependence by creating a new dependence - to benzos. To be sure comfort meds are needed but not strong opiates or 30 days of a benzo

I'm confident others will post as well. Please don't allow your husband to do this. It's not going to end well and is not at all standard care or practice.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2016 9:39 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2008 11:03 pm
Posts: 1544
I agree with DonH--- that trying to stop buprenorphine using agonists NEVER works out. It sounds like the writer is thinking that because of the long half-life of buprenorphine, that morphine would somehow leave her husband better off?

Understand, cause of life, that there are still many detoxes out there that use buprenorphine as a detox tool. I realize that the current scuttlebutt holds that 'suboxone is the hardest thing in the world to come off'... but many of us who work with buprenorphine and opioid agonists regularly find that thought to have no merit. In general, long half-life meds have milder withdrawal that is a bit more prolonged. I don't know where you got the info about buprenorphine half life; most estimates of buprenorphine half-life are in the range of 20-30 hours (i.e. 1 day, not 25 days!) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buprenorphine#Pharmacokinetics

If your husband starts morphine, his tolerance will increase VERY rapidly. I've had patients go to hospitals that stupidly stopped buprenorphine in order to treat trauma injuries-- and in those cases, agonist tolerance skyrocketed over 7 days or even less. They all needed to go through considerable misery just to get re-induced back to buprenorphine!

Your husband would be best off taking his focus off the short-term misery of withdrawal, and instead focusing on the major challenge ahead-- which is finding a way to the transformational aspect of recovery. That aspect is best found through surrender--- and very hard to find when focused on control of symptoms and half-lives. I wish him well-- and for you, be aware that treatment will include pulling you away from the role of helping him. His sobriety is his battle, not yours-- and he will do better as you pull back, and leave him to find his own way to sobriety. Sounds crazy, I know-- which is why so few people get there.


Top
 Profile  
 
Our Sponsors
PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2016 11:07 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 4:42 am
Posts: 4140
And I, in turn, agree with Dr. Junig and donh.

The opportunity your husband has now is to stay on suboxone for a while and get his head in the right place. On suboxone your husband has no withdrawals and no cravings. His addiction gets put into remission as he just feels normal on suboxone..

I think you may be under the impression that if you can get him off of sub quickly that he will be done with addiction and go back to "normal".

1) I'm not totally sure that you know the difference between addiction and dependence. Just because your husband was on 4 to 6 10mg hydros a day, doesn't mean he was addicted, unless he was abusing his medication, going through it more quickly than prescribed, etc. If he was abusing the hydros then yes, he is an addict. If he was taking them as directed for legitimate pain then he was dependent, but not addicted. Having your dose go up after a few weeks is a sign of tolerance, not addiction.

2) If your husband IS an addict then the damage is already done. Addiction can be halted in its progress, but it can't be eradicated. Being off medications such as sub is not proof that he's not an addict anymore. Addiction is a chronic, relapsing, disorder of the brain. It doesn't go away. Your husband's brain is now different and this doesn't make him a bad person, just a person with a disorder he has to deal with for his entire life.

3) Now that your husband is on suboxone it makes sense for him to stay there for a while and concentrate on other recovery tools. Opiates are highly addictive and people can be genetically predisposed to addiction. While that's not his fault, it's his problem. He needs to figure out, with the help of an addiction counselor, the psychological reasons he may have been susceptible to opiate addiction and how to deal with the consequences of being an addict. It will be much easier for him to do this when his symptoms are in remission with suboxone. He needs to acquire the tools, the mindset, or both in order to be in a better place to combat his addiction when he goes off of it.

4) Addiction is progressive. Opiate addiction is particularly tricky. The overdose rate for opiate addicts in this country is sky high. Hazelden is a treatment facility famous for its abstinence-only 12 step based treatment. A few years ago the medical director noted the rate at which its opiate addict graduates were relapsing and dying once the were done with the program. He looked at the data at what was helping opiate addicts stay alive and found that buprenorphine (active ingredient of suboxone) was helping at much higher rates than NA and other abstinence based treatments. Hazelden now has a suboxone program for its opiate addicts.

5) Because addiction is progressive, your husband could cobble together some "clean" time and still relapse in a few months or years. I want you to read this woman's experience if you don't mind.

new-here-finally-accepting-the-gift-suboxone-t12355.html

Please try to keep an open mind and read it. I would like your husband to jump right into staying with suboxone instead of going through what this woman has gone through for years.

Amy

_________________
Done is better than perfect!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 16, 2016 4:10 am 
Offline
Super Poster
Super Poster
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jun 30, 2013 5:05 am
Posts: 156
Welcome Cause of life,
Your intentions come from a really good place and obviously this hasn't been easy for either of you.
It sounds like there is some urgency in getting your husband to WD from suboxone. That makes sense if you think suboxone is perpetuating the problem.
If he does have an addiction, it is wellworth learning more about. It will empower both of you to understand what you are dealing with and how best to proceed. Like Amy said, it doesn't just go away and has nothing to do with will power.
He is "hooked" on suboxone, the same as someone is "hooked" on anti-depressants.
None of us wanted to fall into the hopelessness of addiction.
Suboxone Is designed to eliminate cravings, block the effect of any other opioid use and is very effective in treating pain.
It is capable of giving him his life back as he was before his accident.
Im wondering how he feels a about the decision to stop? Was this his decision?
I agree that the plan highlighted sounds very risky.
Please let us support you, I appreciate this is hard on you too. If you have any other questions please dont hesitate.
Hope to hear from you again,


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 16, 2016 10:20 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2014 7:15 pm
Posts: 2313
Location: Tennessee
Hey CauseOfLife,

I can tell that u obviously love ur husband and ur trying ur very best to help him. That's great because addicts need support from our loved ones more than anything. The only thing that I'm wondering is, how does ur hubby feel about stopping? Is he truly ready or feeling the pressure to stop? Being dependant on suboxone is entirely different than addicted to it, there's a huge difference. No matter how he became addicted he's still a drug addict now and will be fighting this for the rest of his life like the rest of us. Once off suboxone, he'll have cravings for opiates....is he ready with the tools to fight that...it can get extremely difficult. I'm not saying he isn't ready at all, I'm just making sure he is.

Using the morphine to come off sub isn't a good idea at all. Imo u never use opiates to come off sub. It'll take quiet a bit of morphine and like Dr J said, shooting his tolerance way up. There's been several ppl from this forum that has tried this approach and ended up taking an enormous amounts of opiates with very little success. I think u should research this more before making any final decision. Maybe ur hubby would benefit by speaking to other addicts like himself.

I wish ur hubby lot's of luck. He's obviously lucky to have u as a support system.

_________________
Jennifer


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 16, 2016 1:29 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 4:42 am
Posts: 4140
Katipo and JennJenn, thank you for empathizing with the OP. My reply was so into educating that I didn't leave room for the empathy that this poster deserves.

Cause of Life, I hope you don't dismiss what we are saying because we are not answering your question specifically. The answers you have received so far represent many years of personal experience with opiate addiction. Please consider what we have said. I'm sure that you want what is ultimately best for your husband or you wouldn't have written on his behalf.

Amy

_________________
Done is better than perfect!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 16, 2016 7:17 pm 
Offline
Average Poster
Average Poster

Joined: Mon Feb 15, 2016 6:38 pm
Posts: 4
Thank you everyone for your replies. I am taking everything you have said into consideration.
My husband is an addict, he abused to hydros, the poppy sead tea and now the suboxone. When I first came to the conclusion that he was addicted not dependent on the hydros, was when his doctor prescribed him 120 10mg pills and he had them gone within a week and a half. I have done nothing but research about addiction and watch documentaries not to mention I have seen first hand what addiction is. I understand addiction as much as someone who has never been an addict can. As far as the suboxone, it is messing with his head, he gets huge bursts of depression that lasted up to 2 months. He has told me almost everyday that he can't live like this anymore, that he can't stand taking that strip to feel normal anymore. He had told me that the only think that kept him going was me.

It is his idea to come off of the suboxone because he said he can't live like this anymore, he wants to be clean and I do understand that addiction is a life long battle and I'm prepared for that. I don't think that taking him off of suboxone will solve all his problems and he will be "normal" again. I know it won't but I do know that the suboxone is not helping him and that reason being he abused it. Which I know some people will bring him for. But that's where he was at in his addiction to come to realize now that he can't do this anymore. I understand that he didn't use the program like he was supposed to, he wasn't ready for help then. When we first went to suboxone I though that it was going to help him get his life back so he can go into Theropy and get thentools he needs to be clean. But at that time that isn't what he was thinking. He has been on suboxone for 7months, his doctor is telling him this stuff is a walk in the park to get off of and that he won't have any withdraws what so ever. We found out quickly that wasn't true. But now he is ready to be clean. We have a rehab set up for after the 25 days.

The reason we came to the conclusion of 25 days and it's out of his system completely is because we had talked to his theropist who knows a lot about suboxone and with the dose my husband is on 6mg. It takes 25 days for the bup to leave his system completely. I know I don't understand completely the struggle he will have to endure to come off of this or the battle he will have to fight everyday for the rest of his life, but I do know I will be there with him through it all and to help him. I also know that I can't fight this battle for him even though I wish so badly I could. I have seen him go through withdraws, I have seen him breakdown in tears over this addiction, I have seen him broken and beaten and clinically depressed. I have seen him at his lowest and wanted nothing more than to take that all away. Maybe I am too involved in his rehabilitation but when his parents want nothing to do with it and when they tell him suboxone isn't a strong drug and that when he comes off of it he will be looking back and laughing at this situation it's hard not to be there 100% for him when everyone else around him is acting like addiction isn't a big deal and it's something you can just set down and get over and never have to look back.

I guess I'm just asking for advice on how long he will have to wait before taking that medication. His theropist said that he is better off going to his drug of coice to get off of suboxone, because no one knows how to get you off. So At this point him and I both just want to get him clean so he can be that much closer to a sober life. Maybe I'm just so lost at what to do because no matter how much you read or research about addiction you still feel lost on how to help that person. I just want nothing more than to help him..

Our plan was for him to go the minimum days required before going to morphine pills and then take those for 2-3weeks and then enter him into the rehab for a 30 day program. Then after the program get him vivitrol and he will go to NA 90 meetings in 90 days. He will then see a psychiatrist for his mental issues. He was diagnosed with ADHD when he was younger and just hasn't been taking his medication for it because his doctor put him on different medication (just so he could get more money for a name brand medication when the medicine he was taking wasn't name brand but helped him. His doctor said he "no longer had files of that medication") that makes him feel like a zombie. He has some mental issues and issues from his childhood that needs worked out and that were one of the causes for opiate addiction and the reason he tried to numb himself.

I'm not sure if any of this information is helpful, I guess I'm just trying to outlet some of my opinions and trying to let you know a little bit about his background. But my main question is what are the minimum days required? I know all of you are against the idea and for good reason I'm sure but I also know that staying on the suboxone isn't going to help him. I know it has helped a ton of people in worse situations but for him it isn't working and I know it isn't working because he abused it. But that is what happened and I know some people swear up and down that suboxone is a savior and that it helped them get their lives back. I am truly happy for those people and wish them nothing but luck in their recovery. <3 but for my husband due to what has happened it isn't working for him. I just need help and don't know any where else to turn to get this information. So please go easy on replies..I'm not sure where else to turn for help..


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 16, 2016 10:20 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member

Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2009 7:36 pm
Posts: 879
Location: Wisconsin
It is obvious you want to help your husband. The thing is, you are not sure who to trust. It also seems like you are not fully understanding what you are being told. For example, what I think the councilor was trying to tell you is it will take about 25 days to feel about 90% normal after stopping sub. This is in fact true. That does not mean it takes 25 days for sub to leave his body. These two things are not one in the same. It takes about 25 to 30 days for the body to recover from sub being gone. It however takes less than a week and near certain he will drug test negative after 10 days.

That's just one example of a misunderstanding. This is normal. We are asking you to trust US. In fact the second person to respond is an addiction doctor who is likely one of the foremost experts on sub in the USA! Instead you are trusting a doctor telling you coming off sub is a walk in the part. THAT IS NOT EVEN CLOSE TO TRUE! It will be very hard. You have one of two people saying one thing. You will have dozens here saying the opposite.

The thing is, if sub treatment is not working, it's very unlikely that 12 step or NA will! He may need methadone treatment. It is also VERY POSSIBLE that his symptoms are not from sub AT ALL. It's very possible it's from being off of his drug of choice. I would not be surprised in the least if his symptoms remain the same or even get worse after stopping sub. What then?

You did not answer whether a doctor is prescribing the morphine and Xanax. That leads me to believe you are doing this on your own by buying on the street. Think about that. You have experts telling you this is a terrible idea but you think you know better and want to proceed anyhow? Stop and think about that. I know you are at wits end and desperate. But this could make a bad problem that much worse. In fact it's likely!

It's not easy to come off sub but it can be done. We also know how to do it and we will help you with it. It can be done.

Finally I will answer your question. Thing is, this again shows how little you know about all of what you are about to do. He can take morphine at ANY TIME even right now! It will not hurt him. He may well not even feel it. It is only "dangerous" to take sub after taking a lot of morphine or oxy or any opiate. The reverse is not true. It will not hurt him at all. It's still a terrible idea but it will not put him in withdrawals. So if you are hell bent on doing this, you can start anytime.

Please reconsider this. Trying to create and guide your own care or your husbands is the wrong move. Trust us. You will regret this! If he wants to come off sub, well tell you how to do that. Your way is far and away the. Wrong way.


Top
 Profile  
 
   
PostPosted: Wed Feb 17, 2016 1:58 am 
Offline
Average Poster
Average Poster

Joined: Mon Feb 15, 2016 6:38 pm
Posts: 4
Thank you for replying. No that's what I meant by it being out of his system in 25 days I guess those are wrong words to choose in this situation. No the doctor who told him it would be a walk in the park was his suboxone doctor the one who told us it would take 25 days was his theropist. How did you guys get off of suboxone? We have tried tapering him but that didn't work. No they are prescribed. what about the Xanax though? How long will he have to wait off of suboxone. It has been 48hours as of now from his last dose of suboxone.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Feb 17, 2016 5:21 am 
Offline
Super Poster
Super Poster
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jun 30, 2013 5:05 am
Posts: 156
Hello again Cause of life,
I apologise if anything i said was received as patronising. I certainly never meant to sound that way. I made assumptions that you were naive to addiction.
I'm glad you have given your best to try to understand and help your husband.
Im curious what directions the prescribing DR has given you to safely manage this situation?
Together, morphine and Xanax are a dangerous combination.
Is there a reason he cannot WD without using opioids and benzo's? Once the sub is overridden by morphine, he may feel numb again, likely want more and again have to WD from both drugs, of which the benzo's may prove difficult. There are OTC products that people use to ease symptoms that are very effective.
I sense you won't be swayed on this and yes it's completely you and your husbands decision.
All I ask is please stay in touch with us.
I am eager to know how this works out and I think it may help you to unleash a little.
We want to support you, no matter which way things end up.
Please don't be a stranger!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Feb 17, 2016 10:41 am 
Offline
Average Poster
Average Poster

Joined: Mon Feb 15, 2016 6:38 pm
Posts: 4
No Katipo you didn't. I know that a lot of the time families don't know much about addiction and I'm not saying I know it all I'm just saying I have done my research though I can research all I want I still won't know 100% what he is going through. I know that it isn't "dangerous" to take an opiate after taking suboxone but that it is dangerous the other way around. I have talked with his doctor and his theropist and they both agreed that this was going to be the easiest way to get him off of the suboxone. For him to go back to his DOC and then withdraw off of that and go into rehab.
Maybe if the suboxone isn't working than the 90 meetings in 90 days won't. But I have to try something.. And a lot of people have stayed sober after 90 meetings in 90 days not to mention we are going to give him vivitrol to stop the cravings. I guess you could also say that people have stayed sober after suboxone, but we have tried that and it didn't work so now it's time to try something else..
He is asleep right now, at 5:00pm it will be 73 hours of not having anything. Last night his cravings were starting to peak and he was extremely restless. He tried to keep his mind off of it and finally fell asleep at about 5am. Which is amazing to me because he can almost never get any sleep. I wil keep everyone updated on his recovery and thank you very much to everyone. I know it is going to be a long and painful recovery he is ready to get his life back and I'm going to stand by him through it all to get my husband back.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Feb 17, 2016 2:30 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 4:42 am
Posts: 4140
I'm glad that we haven't pushed you away with the information from our perspective, COL.

I just wanted to respond that often research on the subject of buprenorphine doesn't yield great information, which is why we have been giving you more information from our point of view. There is a mix of sub doctors out there and some of them don't know much beyond what they were taught at the 8 hour class they had to take to be able to prescribe sub. Many of them say that tapering off suboxone is a breeze and they recommend stepping off at 2 mg. Ridiculous! The truth is that some people have an easier time than others and most people should try to taper as much as possible (at least to .25 mg) before they step off.

Tapering off sub can only happen when the addict is stable, and obviously your husband is not stable. Usually when people are ready to change their addict behavior and they are given suboxone as a tool it is transformative. Having said that, it's not unusual for any of us to try to "feel" something from suboxone. We are so used to popping a pill or IVing and feeling something that it can be disconcerting when the high doesn't come when they take suboxone. There are many of us who have gone through our medication too quickly trying to catch a high, because we are still dealing with the psychology of being an addict.

Unfortunately, another reason that your husband could be wanting to be off suboxone is so that he can get high again. The nature of this addiction makes us the best liars ever! Plus, he could even be sincere that he wants to be off all meds and stay "clean" and he can still relapse.

What I've noticed about being an addict is that when I'm not being mindful, I can slip into addict behaviors. If you let your mind go on autopilot, that is when you are vulnerable. I'll give you an example from my own life. A couple of summers ago I drove to my dad's house in PA from CO. Although I stopped for the night before, I was pretty tired when I arrived at my dad's. They were out to dinner when I got there so they had left the door open for me. When my addiction was starting back in 2007ish, I would visit my dad and steal opiate meds when I could find them, which was most of the time. So when I arrived that summer, I brought my luggage into the house and then went searching for pills. I found them in a couple places and had already hidden them in my stuff. Then I sat down on the bed and thought about what I was doing.

I recognized that my behavior was that of an addict, not a person in recovery. I knew that it would take so many of these pills to make me feel them, that I was being ridiculous in scooping up 10 hydrocodone pills. (And the only reason I might feel them at all is because I am on a low dose of buprenorphine.) After just a moment's thought I returned the pills to their bottles and thanked God that I came into my right mind before my dad and his wife got home from dinner.

This is what opiate addiction does to the brain, even to people like me who are well-educated about addiction. When my guard is down, when my brain goes on autopilot, I am still susceptible to addict behaviors. The reason I am sharing this with you is to let you know that your husband can be very sincere in what he's telling you about wanting to be clean. At the same time he can feel internally conflicted and on some level, still wanting to get high. Also at the same time he could be totally sincere and still relapse on his drug of choice. The only reason I didn't gobble down those pills at my fathers house was because I knew that my dose of bupe would block the effects and if I wanted to feel them I was going to have to wait until my bupe wore off. It gave me enough time to think about what I was doing.

I'm telling you this because I want you to know what the future could hold for your husband, even if he loves you to Jupiter and back. And because I feel concern for him I want you to be prepared and know that love can't keep him from opiates.

You sound like a awesome, supportive wife and I hope that your hubby's addiction never rears its ugly head. Statistically, that's not probable.

Your husband desperately needs more help than a loving wife can give, so make him go to meetings or even better, an addiction counselor plus group meetings. SMART Recovery has an awesome program based on cognitive behavioral therapy. I don't love 12 step programs, but they are ubiquitous and should force your husband to work on himself, giving him insight into himself. If he's constantly working on recovery, it is less likely that he will relapse. However, when/if he does relapse, don't forget about suboxone as a possible therapy. Just because it may not be working for him this time doesn't mean it won't ever work for him.

The things your husband can do during detox to make himself feel better: ask his doctor to prescribe him clonidine which is actually a blood pressure med used extensively off-label for opiate withdrawal. If he goes on a benzo, you should keep control of his supply and only give it to him once in a 24 hour period. If you do that it should keep him from becoming dependent on it. Clonidine also often has a sedating effect, so rely on that med more than the benzo. (People can become dependent on clonidine also, so decrease his use after the worst symptoms are over, and then only use it a max of once every few days. Many detoxing addicts swear by using loperamide which is the active ingredient of immodium. However, dependence on loperamide is also a potential by product. And some people swear that taking loperamide just postpones the detox. Exercise and hot showers are his friend! Anything that he can find enjoyable is his friend. If video games take his mind off his symptoms, then have him play. Have him binge watch his favorite show, especially if it brings him pleasure. Using morphine only delays his detox.

I wish you both lots of luck and I hope this helps.

Amy

_________________
Done is better than perfect!


Top
 Profile  
 
   
PostPosted: Wed Feb 17, 2016 2:38 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 4:42 am
Posts: 4140
Katipo wrote:
Hello again Cause of life,
I apologise if anything i said was received as patronising. I certainly never meant to sound that way. I made assumptions that you were naive to addiction.
I'm glad you have given your best to try to understand and help your husband.
Im curious what directions the prescribing DR has given you to safely manage this situation?
Together, morphine and Xanax are a dangerous combination.
Is there a reason he cannot WD without using opioids and benzo's? Once the sub is overridden by morphine, he may feel numb again, likely want more and again have to WD from both drugs, of which the benzo's may prove difficult. There are OTC products that people use to ease symptoms that are very effective.
I sense you won't be swayed on this and yes it's completely you and your husbands decision.
All I ask is please stay in touch with us.
I am eager to know how this works out and I think it may help you to unleash a little.
We want to support you, no matter which way things end up.
Please don't be a stranger!


Katipo, you are so sweet! Your advice is such a great mix of intelligence, experience, and empathy! I'm guessing that you're not American because of your spelling. Many words that Americans spell with a "z", other English speaking countries use an "s". Wherever you are from, you are a great asset to our forum! I bet you would make a very good addiction counselor. :)

Amy

_________________
Done is better than perfect!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Feb 17, 2016 6:52 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member

Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2009 7:36 pm
Posts: 879
Location: Wisconsin
Wow, great comments and advice Amy. That goes for the others as well. Thus is why I hope you will trust us in what we are saying - some better than others. It's really sad when some doctors provide poor and sometimes all out wrong information. To that all I can say is the person who barely graduated medical school and passed his license exam by 1 point is still called DOCTOR. Always remember that.

Please keep us updated.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Feb 17, 2016 10:35 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 4:42 am
Posts: 4140
donh wrote:
Wow, great comments and advice Amy. That goes for the others as well. Thus is why I hope you will trust us in what we are saying - some better than others. It's really sad when some doctors provide poor and sometimes all out wrong information. To that all I can say is the person who barely graduated medical school and passed his license exam by 1 point is still called DOCTOR. Always remember that.

Please keep us updated.


I always appreciate it when my favorite posters have nice things to say about me. Your advice is always on target, Don, and it helps, I think, when a number of us offer similar advice with different tones. You never know what people are going to respond to. We all make a great team! :)

Amy

_________________
Done is better than perfect!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2016 5:01 am 
Offline
Super Poster
Super Poster
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jun 30, 2013 5:05 am
Posts: 156
Amy, that would be nice if it were true! Thankyou for such kind words. ☺️

Cause of life,
How are you and your husband today?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2016 9:54 am 
Offline
Super Poster
Super Poster

Joined: Wed Mar 18, 2015 6:46 pm
Posts: 167
Location: Alabama
CauseOfLife,

You have received very good advice here from Dr. J and many people with first hand, personal experience. Please let me add to that my experience. I was addicted to morphine originally prescribed for legitimate pain. I tried tapering off of it slowly. It was a miserable existence and a goal I could not achieve. Suboxone "gave me my life back". I have been on it almost a year and have tapered from 20 mg to 4 mg currently. Tapering the Suboxone is far more comfortable than the morphine was, and I am much clearer in my mind (cognitive abilities) than I was on morphine. I strongly recommend continuing with this therapy, rather than going back to opiates to try to get off opiates.

Please keep us posted,
Morphing


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2016 11:47 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2014 7:15 pm
Posts: 2313
Location: Tennessee
Amy ur story reminded me of something that I hadn't thought about in yrs. I'll share a short version hoping it could give CauseOfLife something to think about. When I was taking morphine (I was addicted to morphine for yrs but switched to oxycodone after I decided to stop IVing it). There was a point where my mother and my brother gave me money to go get some of the morphine 100mg so that they could dose it out to me in hopes that I'd be able to wean myself down enough to stop completely. I agreed and told them everything they were wanting to hear so that every morning I could wake up with a shot of morphine. It only lasted until the medicine disappeared then I was bk to using again. I'm extremely ashamed of that but I lied because my addiction was in complete control. Gosh thinking about some of the things I put my family through really gets to me sometimes.

CauseOfLife we are in no way saying that this is what ur hubby is doing, just that it's a possibility. With addicts who's in active addiction or in danger of relapse, using will trump everything. I know u have done lots of research, but u need to be aware of the possibilities. Putting an opiate addict on a taper with opiates is playing with fire.

_________________
Jennifer


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2016 4:56 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 4:42 am
Posts: 4140
Katipo wrote:
Amy, that would be nice if it were true! Thankyou for such kind words. ☺️

Cause of life,
How are you and your husband today?


It IS true! Are you questioning my authority??? Lol

Are you saying that the person you are on the forum isn't an accurate depiction of who you really are? Or are you actually saying that you are unable to accept praise because you don't think highly enough of yourself?

Amy

_________________
Done is better than perfect!


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 23 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Our Sponsors
Suboxone Forum latest topics RSS feed Subscribe to the entire forum
 

 

 
Fond Du Lac Psychiatry
Dr. Jeffrey Junig, M.D., Ph.D.

  • Board Certified Psychiatrist
  • Asst Clinical Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group