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PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2012 10:24 pm 
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HI, I'm new to this forum. I was surfing the internet, looking for someone to talk to about issues I have been going through. My boyfriend is a recovering heroin addict. He's been to rehab and was doing good until recently... he ran out of depression medication. He started taking suboxone behind my back. He claims it's only been going on for two weeks, but he's in withdrawal without it already... Does withdrawal occur that fast? he was addicted to suboxone for like 5 years previously. I have so many questions, and barely any answers. I just don't know where to turn. Please someone help me out....


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2012 11:45 pm 
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Hi christina and welcome to the forum. It sounds as though you're seeing suboxone as something that your BF is abusing. Suboxone is a treatment FOR heroin (and other opiate) addiction. You said he is a heroin addict who went back on suboxone (albeit behind your back). Did it occur to you that perhaps he felt his recovery was in jeopardy and he felt he was protecting it by going back into suboxone treatment? Or there's the other possibility that he already had relapsed and gone back to heroin and went back into sub treatment to get back into remission/recovery.

If either of those two scenarios were to be the case, then in my opinion, that's a good thing! No, he may not have told you about it, but he took solid action to protect his possibly-wavering recovery. In other words, he was making sure he got the treatment he needed for a fatal disease (opiate addiction). (Remember, I'm speculating.)

Try not to think of suboxone as the enemy. It's a treatment made especially for opiate addiction. It's not a drug of abuse normally. It's not chemically the same as "regular" pain pills and when taken correctly, they won't get the patient high and in fact it will block other opiates from having an effect on him.

I hope this helps you understand more about how sub works. If you have more questions, please just ask. And if I've misunderstood something you've said, please clarify and I'll reassess my response.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2012 4:35 am 
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Is he being prescribed Suboxone? Or is he scoring it off the street?


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2012 10:33 am 
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That's the thing, he's scoring it off the street. He claims he was taking it the proper way but because of his past actions it's hard to believe anything he says. He was addicted to suboxone 5 years previous, before he started doing heroin. He's going through withdrawal now which makes me think he was taking more than he should, or not in the correct manner...


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2012 11:43 am 
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A person taking suboxone correctly will still have withdrawals when they stop. We are dependent on it, but not "addicted" to it. Now, that's not to say that someone can't come along, use suboxone incorrectly, use it to get high, and allow a treatment method to become their drug of choice. It usually doesn't happen with suboxone, but it could happen.

In order to get a good, clear picture of what's going on, we could use a bit more info. I try to see the upside of things and others may see another side, like for instance, a more negative view of it. And if we don't have more info, either way, we're all just guessing. Let us know what you can and we'll all do our best to support you both.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2012 10:54 pm 
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coffinjoechristina wrote:
That's the thing, he's scoring it off the street. He claims he was taking it the proper way but because of his past actions it's hard to believe anything he says. He was addicted to suboxone 5 years previous, before he started doing heroin. He's going through withdrawal now which makes me think he was taking more than he should, or not in the correct manner...


As an ex-heroin addict (now Suboxone dependent) person, the only reason I'd have considered getting Suboxone would have been to try and help me get off heroin and to do some kinda home-detox... or if someone gave me a heap of Suboxone for free and I had enough to get me by until I had money for more heroin, but even then it's not preferable because of its blocking effects.

It's possible that because your boyfriend has chosen to use Suboxone and not heroin, it's a sign he's actually trying to improve himself and his wellbeing. A person who's been using heroin for a period will find it incredibly hard to get any "buzz" out of Suboxone, so it's difficult to see that as a motive. Maybe he wants to get his life manageable but doesn't feel confident enough to go without opioids completely?

Maybe this is a step in the right direction? In which case, it'd be good to support him to get Suboxone legitimately.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 5:58 pm 
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Hi Coffin Joe Christina,
What do you need to know? After five years on suboxone, he probably is somewhat sick altho now its only been (so he says) two weeks. Mostly psychological, I would say from my experience only. I used to feel addicted to heroin after going back to using in 3 - 4 days. Addicts lie, that's #1. The drug is the first and only reality to an addict, that's #2. I used to lie to everyone about my using. Suboxone gets you high, that's #3.

Anything else you would like to ask opinions on, I will check for your p osts. I'm a recovering addict, newly clean again at 58. Jesus, never saw this coming, got on percocet for chronic pain graduated to suboxone, ruined my life again, that's all she wrote. Also, was a mental health counselor with lived experience no degree.

Take care of yourself @#1, not him.
Older Now


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 6:01 pm 
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Suboxone does NOT get the person high, if they are tolerant to it and addicts are tolerant. Watch it, Older Now, with presenting things as factual when they are not.

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 6:19 pm 
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To Hatmaker,
I tried to make it clear that I was relating MY experience. Suboxone did get me high. Me.
Only speaking for myself, not interested in debating. I guess I should have said it that way.
Older Now


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 6:54 pm 
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To Hatmaker 510 I don't like your language and I don't like being threatened. I said for me suboxone got me high and your response is just as adamant. You say it doesn't. What makes you fac tual and me wrong?

I see where this place is at, not for me.
By to people who did help
Older Now


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 9:42 pm 
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Hi, Guy's ,,,
I'm gonna chip in here,.
If your getting high on sub, your lucky, but not because your getting high, lucky because you probably don't need it.
When your at the >2mg taper zone and craving like crazy for a receptor top up, day in day out, and what would otherwise be happening with a "skies the limit" morphine habit, it's pretty easy to work out what sub's prescribed for.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 02, 2012 6:16 am 
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Older Now wrote:
To Hatmaker 510 I don't like your language and I don't like being threatened. I said for me suboxone got me high and your response is just as adamant. You say it doesn't. What makes you fac tual and me wrong?

I see where this place is at, not for me.
By to people who did help
Older Now


If you were relating your experience, you would have said, "suboxone got ME high". But you said, "suboxone gets you high, #3". So yes, you were stating it as it's a fact. It's not a fact.

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-I'm only responsible for what I say, not for what you understand.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 02, 2012 10:20 am 
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Sounds like a bit of a 12-stepper.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 02, 2012 1:26 pm 
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Hey Christina,

I am staying away from the drama of the previous couple posts, so know that going into what I'm saying please, I'm not trying to discount anyone else's previous statments.

It sounds to me like you are in a classic co-dependent relationship. Your boyfriend is an addict and you are mostly not an addict, meaning you probably don't understand why he does the things he does. To you he is choosing his behavior over and over again just choosing to get high despite the consequences. I can assure you that it is very possible he is trying to get cleaned up and is trying his best...thus the suboxone. Addiction is a very hard thing to explain to a non addict. Once we get to the point we are ready to get sober it is not just as easy as choosing to quit. If he is taking the suboxone orally as it is intended it is very unlikely that he will get any high from it. I'll be honest and say that the only time I have ever gotten a mild high from suboxone was after a period of abstinence from all opiates and only then for the first dose. It just doesn't work that way for those of us who have a tolerance to opiates, and if he is an addict he will have a tolerance. Now if he is shooting up the subs then maybe, but your not supposed to be able to do that with them because of the naloxone. Just because he is getting them off the street doesn't mean he is abusing them. I would encourage him to go see a doctor and get into a treatment program which will help hold him accountable for his use.

I know this type of thing is really hard for you to understand and harder to deal with every day. If you love him try to support him and be tough but forgiving of his flaws. Try to give him a reason to stay sober but don't be too hard on him if he messes up. Believe me, as an addict nobody knows how to beat us up as good as we do ourselves.

I'm glad you found this forum, hope something one of us said has helped you a little. Feel free to ask anything you wish, most of us won't get offended by whatever you say.


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