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 Post subject: I Am Giving This My All!
PostPosted: Mon Jun 10, 2013 7:00 am 
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Hello,
Although I usually have more time to write in the morning, today I spent a good amount of it becoming a member of this site. So, today's writing wont be very long. but I feel its an important step for me. As many people thought I never realized I would find myself sneaking off into a corner of the house to join a website and quickly trying to post something without getting caught. Not many people in my circle of life know what I am going through, so it is here that I hope to find the ability to talk. I am in my forties and years ago I had several injuries. I was prescribed pain pills to get me through. Then I had more injuries, thus more pain pills. At first they were not a problem. I took them when I needed them. Then as time went on I had more pain, thus my prescription increased. Somewhere within all that I began to notice that they helped me push through tough times. If I had a project to do on my house I could take a few extra L.T. (I am not sure of the rules and if you can post the name of the pill you took, so I will just abbreviate them). The next thing I knew the project was done. I maintained and continue to maintain a normal life. I train at the gym and am a pretty large bodybuilder. I work a regular job and sometimes a few side jobs. I take care of my house and my family. I don't blow off activities or work. BUT I have started to take more and more. I spoke with my doctor about me pain a while ago and had my meds changed from LT to OC. At first I felt that it was less peppy and didn't really like it, BUT if was stronger and the feeling of needing it increased. This continued for a pretty long time, several years. Most recently I could take 200 to 300 mgs in a day and not raise a single suspicion that I was using anything. All of my work got done. I went to the gym. I ate my six square meals and took care of my family. Then I started to think. Is this how I want to live my life? I am going pill to pill. Weekend to be able to take more and really block everything out to the next weekend. Or doctor's visit to doctor's visit hoping that my urine would show the right things so I could get my next script. I know how I got here. I had some help from the doctors but it was me that swallowed them. I know I could manage with less but I took more. I started to watch a few of my friends change. My one oldest friend had started using too. The same things just popping here and there, to not being able to stop. The difference is and I am not judging him, he began to lie. He would make plans with me a week in advance and talk about it up to the day before. Then the day of I wouldn't hear from him. He would owe me money and not pay in full, but have some ridiculous excuse. I saw him grow old and lose weight. I saw the look in his eyes that he needed something and now. Then I thought, that could be me. I was talking to a person that I know from the gym not too long ago about his life and he described his brother in law as a drunk. I thought, what if people know about me? Now Father's Day is coming and all I can think about is my baby. I have held her as I opened pill bottles and had to move it further away so that she couldn't touch them. I have had to make sure I didn't drop them so that she didn't pick them up. I have realized that I need to move past this. I know I need to. I do not have the kind of job that I can go to meetings. My family would not be a good idea. I know there are only a small handful of people in my life that I can tell. And even them I need to be careful. So here I am. I was able to get a good number of 8 mg strips. I plan on doing this with as little exposure as possible. I know that the mind plays tricks on you, yet sometimes it wins. This time I am determined and posting here is my first step. I made this decision on Saturday. I stopped my pills and took 2mgs sub before bed. I woke up and took 2mgs more. I went to the gym and started to crave. I came home and ate then took 3 mgs before doing housework. Later before bed I took 2mgs more. Today is day TWO. I am going to wrap up this post, eat breakfast, take 2mgs more and go to work. I have a bunch of strips cut up into 1mg pieces. My plan as of now is to move forward and take 1mg anytime I have a craving until I can sit down and log back into this site. I will post more later and hope to be able to read what others are doing.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 10, 2013 4:36 pm 
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We have all been at some variation of where you find yourself now. You are not alone, even though your addict side has you keeping a secret from everyone.

I, too, was receiving pain meds from a doctor, but I knew I was drug-seeking from the get-go. But I can identify with trying to make sure that my urine had the right concentrations of different meds. I was constantly running through my oxycodone faster than it was prescribed. (You can mention your drug of choice here, no problem.) I ended up ratting myself out to my pain doctor and switching to an addictionologist who put me on suboxone. I wanted to cut off any kind of escape route for myself, so I ended up telling everyone about my addiction.

I wish you felt comfortable going to a good doctor to get your sub, but since you're not, we can try to help you as much as we can. From what it sounds like, you are going to utilize the sub you have now to help get you off of your pills. Your plan is to take 1 mg every time you can't stand it and the cravings get too bad? Do you feel more comfortable playing it by ear than having a specific plan? Have you thought about what would happen if you run out of subs, but don't feel like you're ready to be off opiates?
Do you have a back up plan?

In any case, welcome to the forum and I hope we can help you!

Amy

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 10, 2013 9:22 pm 
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Thank you for replying to my start. Yes I have thought about a lot of things. I can not come out so to speak and it would be impossible for me to go to a sub doc. I have far too much to lose. I'm making this choice on my own.
I'm pretty sure I will not run out of subs. Today was day two. I got by on a total of 8mgs. Just saturday I used 210 oc and about 80 lt. I had enough to put down a horse but I just plugged along. It was part of the reason I need to change. I thought 300 mgs and I'm just fine where is this going. I have made up my mind. I'm using gaba 5htp multis aminos and temazapan to sleep. My plan is to get level. I want to level out so that I can stay at 4 to 5 mgs a day. Once I feel good I will keep that level and dose for seven days then drop slowly again for seven more days. I'm eating Small healthy meals and drinking tons of water today was a god Day.
I'm going to watch some tv go to bed and post tomorrow. I could use any advice you could offer. I'm alone and will give it all I have. I have about 18 eight mg subs. I'm hoping its a good start.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 12:46 am 
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I'm hoping what I post here for you will help you a bit......


[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Ls1F6vNhYw[/youtube]


the link for "how suboxone works PT. 2"--------------- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wqn5qDdpzfk




[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H2CQ94aXDoQ[/youtube]




[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RASNQrfa3ig[/youtube]


[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hMcXOTj1z8[/youtube]

_________________
anyone can give up,
its the easiest thing in the world to do, but to
hold it together, when everyone would understand if you fell apart
That's TRUE STRENGTH
http://almostoneyearclean.blogspot.com/


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 6:30 am 
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Amber4,
Thank you for the videos. I was able to watch part 1 and 2, but cant watch the others. My private time to reach out is limited. It is hard for me to sneak a video. I had to bust out an old pair of head sets just for the first two. I only have time when my family is asleep and if my wife walked in and saw me she would wonder what was up and I just can not have her on me. We have had a long bumpy road and things are great now even with this battle. We have our baby, so that is what we focus on. I did watch the first two and wonder if the others were for or against using subs. Believe it or not I have a degree in education and a separate degree in psychology. I understand about tolerance and ceilings and blockers. I understand habit and change. I also have ADD so I try to keep to some schedules and think about things all the way through. The videos I watched started to frighten me a bit. I know I cant go cold turkey so for now I am going to stay on subs. I am going to try to find the best way for me to break my habit. Today is day three of this challenge. I tossed and turned and woke up soaking wet. I am going to look around on the site and see if there is a better place to put my posts.
All help is appreciated.
It is easier for me to look at my phone than watch videos. I am doing this alone.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 11:27 pm 
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well I'm sorry your in this all alone....

I know I couldn't have come as far as I have, without the "net" of family/friends I have now.

I hope you are able to build that for yourself someday, soon.

Okay, here's some articles he's written then,,, since it's easier for you to read.
I'm going to copy/paste them, and I'll bold the titles....... better yet, I'll do separate posts...
HOPE THIS HELPS YOU


The Truth About Suboxone

by J T Junig on 2011/08/28
More than ever, patients have easy access to information once read only by scientists and medical professionals. And at the same time, doctors have reduced the time spent with patients during appointments. The result has been an increase in internet-educated patients, who come to appointments armed with data from package inserts, information from internet health forums, and stacks of questions from net-savvy relatives.

There is a good side to this process, of course. Patients are wise to take greater interest in their personal health, and to be knowledgeable of medications that they are taking. And whether good or bad, the situation is necessary, given the abdication by many physicians of their roles as educators.

But there are downsides to the situation as well. Package inserts provide studies and odds ratios for the risks from medications, but interpreting the studies and odds ratios requires education and experience. Some data is reported in a way that a person without considerable education in statistics would have a hard time deciphering what is or isn’t relevant. Some patients struggle under the burden of calculating and weighing risks, and prefer to have a careful, caring doctor provide his/her opinion whether a medications is safe or not. Speaking from my role as physician, I am frustrated when patients choose to follow advice from an online forum over a recommendation based on medical knowledge or a careful literature search..

Doctors sometimes add to the problem. I am frustrated when doctors make claims that are not supported by best medical practice or by medical science. Distinctions between sources of information are blurred, so that some ‘facts’ are based on nothing but rumor. The process is like the old ‘telephone line’ game; a doctor reads a question about a medication or illness, and responds with his/her opinion. Another doctor then hears or reads that answer, adopts it as fact, and shares it with other doctors—who then reinforce the ‘factual’ nature of the information.

People tend to take information from physician educators/writers verbatim, as if the act of putting information online, in writing, guarantees that it to be true. People are confused when they read conflicting ‘facts’ or recommendations from people with comparable credentials.

I try, when writing here, to differentiate between facts, best medical practice, and personal opinion. If someone asks ‘how long should I stay on Suboxone?’, I’ll reply that several studies show high relapse rates in people who stay on Suboxone for less than 6 months (fact), that more and more physicians are keeping patients on the medication long-term (medical practice), and that in my opinion, many people are best off staying on the medication for an extended period of time. You get the idea.

I think it is because of my PhD training that I tend to take a closer look at things that everyone ‘knows’ and ask, ‘says who?’ History has given us many examples of things that everyone knew that turned out to be wrong—from the connection between autoimmune disease and breast implants that wasn’t, to global cooling, the impending disaster when I was a kid (read here)—and we all know how THAT turned out!
The treatment of opioid dependence with buprenorphine/Suboxone appears to be particularly vulnerable to misinformation. Some examples:

The naloxone in Suboxone prevents the person from getting ‘high’: Naloxone is not active orally or sublingually, and is added to Suboxone to prevent intravenous injection of the medication. Confusion comes in part from mistaking naloxone, an IV medication, with naltrexone, an orally-active medication that is NOT part of Suboxone.

People will abuse Subutex because it doesn’t have the opioid blocker in it: Subutex or the generic equivalent—buprenorphine—works just like Suboxone when taken correctly. Doctors and pharmacists are mistaken when they believe that buprenorphine is more addictive if naloxone is not included. In reality, the subjective effects of Suboxone and Subutex are identical. There IS a relatively low incidence of intravenous abuse of buprenorphine; Suboxone in theory causes withdrawal if injected because of the presence of naloxone. Realize, though, that the effects of buprenorphine or Suboxone are similar, whether injected or taken correctly. Injected buprenorphine has the same ‘ceiling effect’ as does sublingual buprenorphine, and so people on buprenorphine maintenance would NOT experience an opioid ‘high’ after injecting their medication—any more than they do when taking it sublingually.
The tablet should not be crushed or chewed: The package insert recommends that Suboxone tablets should be taken sublingually, without crushing the tablet. I am guessing that the recommendation comes out of an attempt to standardize the bio-availability of buprenorphine. Studies show that as little as 15% of a dose of buprenorphine is absorbed, and in my opinion, the high cost of the medication warrants efforts to reduce the amount that gets wasted. The bio-availability is affected by the concentration of buprenorphine in saliva, the surface area available for absorption, and the time that the medication is in contact with absorptive surfaces. Passage of buprenorphine through mucous membranes is the rate-limiting step for absorption–NOT dissolution of the tablet. In other words, crushing or chewing the tablet does NOT cause a ‘high’, and is NOT a sign of drug-seeking behavior. Neither does crushing or chewing hasten the onset time of a dose of Suboxone.

Discussions about chewing or crushing buprenorphine provide examples of the doublespeak that only confuses people. My own recent discussion with another Suboxone prescriber went like this: “I don’t want patients to crush or chew the tablet because that will make it get absorbed too quickly. In fact, I usually recommend the film, because it dissolves much more quickly than the tablet.” Say what? Do we want it to dissolve more quickly or not? The truth is that it really does not matter. The dissolving of buprenorphine— or the film– is the LONG part of the process.

The veins under the tongue absorb the drug in Suboxone. Actually, buprenorphine passes through all of the surfaces in the mouth, eventually entering capillaries under the surface. The veins under the tongue absorb little or no buprenorphine.

You must stop smoking cigarettes if you are on Suboxone: I have searched the literature and I have talked to folks at Reckitt Benckiser, and I can find no evidence to back up this claim. Scientifically, I cannot think of a reason that cigarette smoking would affect the absorption of buprenorphine, except perhaps to increase production of saliva, diluting the buprenorphine in solution and reducing diffusion into tissues. I doubt this would have any significant effect on the bio-availability of buprenorphine, and my clinical experiences backs that up. Patients in my practice who smoke have had normal responses to buprenorphine or Suboxone.

You can’t take pain pills if you are on Suboxone: Actually you can, but they will only reduce pain if the dose is sufficient. I often use this approach to treat people on buprenorphine who undergo surgery. But problems ARE caused if a person does things in the opposite order. In that case—if someone taking opioid agonists then takes buprenorphine– there is risk that the person will develope precipitated withdrawal, depending on the amount of opioid agonist that was being used.

The longer you are on Suboxone, the harder it is to stop: I have read no studies supporting this oft-read comment, and I can think of NO reason that it would be true. The tolerance to buprenorphine is set by the ceiling effect of the drug, and once tolerance develops, typically by several weeks on the medication, longer periods of time do not push tolerance higher.

The film formulation is safer than the tablet. Says who? If we are worrying about kids getting their hands on Suboxone, yes—the little orange tablets look like candy to a toddler. But little red strips of flavored material appear appetizing as well. ALL medications should be kept away from children. If the safety concerns are directed toward patients—for example one doctor told me he prescribes the film because it cannot be crushed—remember that crushing Suboxone is not a problem. I SUSPECT (only my opinion) that the change in formulation was a marketing ploy aimed toward preventing acceptance of generic buprenorphine tablets. Reckitt Benckiser apparently convinced the state of Wisconsin to cover the film exclusively, rather than allow addicts the choice of taking generic buprenorphine—a medication that works exactly the same as Suboxone, at about half the cost.
I think you get the idea. Whether thinking about Suboxone or another medication, I urge readers to always ask the question, ‘says who?’ There are MANY experts out there on the internet—and some exhibit more restraint in their comments than others. Ask yourself, what is the mechanism for what is being described? And if it doesn’t seem to make sense, consider that just perhaps, you’re the right one.
.Read more at http://www.suboxonetalkzone.com/the-tru ... yQA8Stx.99

_________________
anyone can give up,
its the easiest thing in the world to do, but to
hold it together, when everyone would understand if you fell apart
That's TRUE STRENGTH
http://almostoneyearclean.blogspot.com/


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 11:31 pm 
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This one is about " Stopping Suboxone"




Why do some docs kick patients off buprenorphine?

by J T Junig on 2010/09/07



I often receive e-mails from people that go something like this: I was addicted to oxycodone and heroin for 5 years, and lost my marriage, several jobs, and the trust of my children. I was completely broke, and considering suicide. Then I heard about treatment with buprenorphine and found a doc who prescribed it. Since then everything has been going much better; I have a job, I’m putting some savings away, and I have been starting to reconcile with my family. But my doctor says he wants me off Suboxone and is making me taper, and I’m definitely not ready. I am starting to panic because I know that if I have to go off buprenorphine I’ll only end up using again. Is there a way to make him keep me on buprenorphine?

I have described my approach ad nauseum on this blog. I look at the ‘givens’:

- Despite everyone’s wish that addicts stop using opioids and ‘get off everything,’ it just doesn’t work that way. The relapse rate after stopping opioids is very high, whether stopping buprenorphine or any other opioid substance.

- Opioid dependence is a chronic illness that never goes away. People relapse even after years of sobriety.

- Traditional treatment suffers from very high costs and very low success rates, and requires a large time commitment. Traditional treatment does NOT offer any ‘long term protection’ against relapse; if a person stops attending meetings, the rate of relapse becomes similar to those who never went through treatment.

- Buprenorphine can hold opioid dependence in remission in motivated addicts. It is not just a ‘substitution’ of one drug for another, as the ‘obsession’ which is the essence of addiction is reduced, allowing personality to improve and for other interests to return.

- The side effects and risks of taking buprenorphine are not significant, especially when compared with treatments for other life-threatening conditions.



- Even a short relapse can have unpredictably severe consequences, including legal trouble, loss of career, loss of key relationships, and death.

I could go on and on with this list, but you get the idea. My own conclusion then has been that buprenorphine should be considered a long-term treatment for a long-term condition.

Why do some doctors insist on a short-term approach? One reason is simple ignorance, and not understanding the nature of opioid addiction. Many docs persist in seeing addiction as a ‘choice’, and fall into the same silly thinking that some addicts initially believe, that the main barrier to sobriety is withdrawal. Addicts who become miserable enough to get through withdrawal quickly learn that the withdrawal is NOT the problem—at least not the MAIN problem—as even after the symptoms go away, the addict relapses. This is maddening to the addict’s loved ones, and some doctors see this situation and become angry at the addict, rather than understanding the nature of addiction. At least there are now studies showing the high rate of relapse, and hopefully the data will change the behavior of physicians prescribing buprenorphine.

Another reason for short-term prescribing is because the buprenorphine is being used as detox, for entry into a ‘total sobriety’ treatment center. I won’t get too upset about such a situation, except to point out that such treatment centers commonly mislead patients about their chances. At the treatment center where I used to work, Nova counseling services in Oshkosh, WI, the counselors would get very excited about patients who looked good on their way out the door. But nobody seemed to feel any responsibility if that same patient relapsed and returned—or died—six months down the line. Of course many patients never made it to the end of treatment, getting thrown out early or leaving on their own. The counselors blamed those failures on the patient—instead of recognizing a failing treatment strategy. THIS IS A VERY SERIOUS PROBLEM, by the way, with residential, traditional treatment programs—a problem that exists because of stigma about addiction, and a sense that addicts are less deserving of good health than ‘normal people.’ How can I say that? Think of it this way—what if any other illness was managed in this way? If heart disease or diabetes simply failed to make people better most of the time, and the doctors routinely blamed the patients for the lack of success, how would THAT fly?

My biggest concern is that there are motivations to get patients off buprenorphine that come from the requirements placed on physicians who prescribe the medication. Physicians can treat only 30 patients at a time with buprenorphine. After a year they can apply to raise that limit to 100 patients. Ironically there is no limit at all on the number of patients a doctor can treat with opioid agonists! In a typical practice, patients are seen less often as they become more ‘stable’ on buprenorphine, resulting in a situation like mine– I have about 100 patients who have done well on buprenorphine for some time, many of whom had multiple attempts at ‘traditional treatment’ and some who were on buprenorphine from other docs, who would like to stay on buprenorphine long-term. That’s fine with me; buprenorphine patients are a small part of my practice. But if I wanted to make significant income from patients on buprenorphine, I would need to clear out spots for new patients who are seen at greater frequency, and who would pay the initial intake fee.

In other words, doctors are rewarded for high patient turnover, and the growth and earning power of their practices are limited by the cap on the number of patients they can treat. I understand the reason for the cap; we don’t want to suddenly have thousands of patients on buprenorphine without adequate treatment and supervision. But there is always a downside to any regulation, and rapid turnover in some practices is a downside to this particular regulation.

I don’t have any particular advice for people who are being forced off buprenorphine for no fault of their own, other than to seek out a new physician. Patients who are considering starting buprenorphine may want to ask the doctors in their area about their attitudes toward long-term maintenance. Hopefully over time at least some of the motivations for pushing people off buprenorphine will become less significant. For the docs who are doing the pushing, I encourage you to examine your own motivations. I realize that everybody wants to get back to how they were before becoming addicted to opioids… but it is important to remember that nobody can predict the outcome of a relapse, and some people die.
.
Read more at http://www.suboxonetalkzone.com/why-do- ... 1a1I8pf.99

_________________
anyone can give up,
its the easiest thing in the world to do, but to
hold it together, when everyone would understand if you fell apart
That's TRUE STRENGTH
http://almostoneyearclean.blogspot.com/


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 11:34 pm 
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last but NOT least----------------

" Suboxone Withdrawl"





Withdrawal from Suboxone

by J T Junig on 2010/12/31

I often receive e-mails asking for advice on tapering Suboxone, or asking how long Suboxone withdrawal should last. People who read my blog know my approach to stopping Suboxone; I see it as an exercise in futility even in the rare cases where the person is successful, because of a relapse rate that verges on 100%.

A couple myths to get out of the way… there is NO evidence that withdrawal becomes more difficult the longer a person is on buprenorphine. In fact, from my experience the opposite is true. The feelings and emotions during withdrawal are aggravated by the guilt and shame of active using, and the further from active using a person gets, the less the suffering during withdrawal—and the better able the person is to keep some perspective on what is happening, rather than drowning in despair. I believe that the severity of withdrawal is subject to a ‘kindling effect’, a phenomenon that affects seizure disorders and other neural activity as well. In other words, the pathways of the brain that are used the most frequently are the pathways that are most likely to fire again. So a person who has been through very severe withdrawal is likely to experience withdrawal as very severe, no matter what agent the person is stopping. It would make sense that the more time that goes by in between episodes of withdrawal, the less powerful would be the kindling effect—sort of like ruts in a muddy road being erased by repeated cycles of weather over time.

Many people write on blogs or forums that Suboxone withdrawal is worse than coming off opioid agonists. This is simply ‘poppycock!’ I have seen many, many people go through opioid withdrawal, and have experienced it myself (gratefully, many years ago!). People going through withdrawal from agonists are very miserable; they tend to stay in bed, getting up only to race to the bathroom because of severe diarrhea. Their legs shake involuntarily—a very uncomfortable experience that is similar to severe ‘restless legs.’ The mental effects are perhaps the worst; most people have severe depression and thoughts of suicide. Eventually, when the person attempts to get out of bed, he/she faces weeks of profound fatigue and weakness. During my own detox ten years ago I remember my family visiting after a week or two, and being able to walk about half a block before needing to sit and catch my breath. Appetite is gone for weeks as well, and most people lose significant weight during detox.

Withdrawal from buprenorphine, on the other hand, rarely forces addicts into bed for more than a day or two. I’m not saying that they don’t FEEL like staying in bed, but they will still usually get to work and engage in the activities of daily living—eating, showering, getting dressed, etc. A simple look at the forums shows a profound difference between Suboxone and agonist withdrawal; people coming off Suboxone write about how bad they are feeling, whereas people coming off agonists are nowhere to be found— and are certainly not able to sit at the computer and type!



There are two basic approaches to stopping Suboxone. One is to taper slowly, and the other is to just ‘jump’ and handle the withdrawal as best as possible, sometimes with the help of clonidine, benzos, or other substances. Some people find that THC helps, but I can’t really recommend that approach—at least not in states where there are no laws allowing the use of ‘medical marijuana.’ There are a couple taper methods described here and there on the web; I described something called the ‘liquid taper method’ on the forum that uses tiny doses of dissolved buprenorphine, administered by an eye dropper. As I mentioned in an earlier post there is a new transdermal buprenorphine system hitting the market soon, and that should make things considerably easier. The main problem with any taper is that the person usually gets to a certain point and then realizes that a full dose would cause a ‘buzz’—and that buzz is almost impossible to say ‘no’ to, especially after being in minor withdrawal for several days or weeks! The transdermal approach is appealing because it would allow the person to get rid of all tablets that could be used to bail out of the taper. I can’t imagine that there is much chance of success if the person has 8 mg of tablets stashed away in the house somewhere!

Because of the tendency to bail out of a taper, most people who start out tapering end up ‘jumping’ at some point—raising the question of whether people should just jump from the start, planning to be miserable for a good few weeks, and then just tolerating it. For those taking that approach, the main thing is to STICK WITH IT. In order for your receptors to return to normal, you MUST be miserable— that misery is what causes the neurons to manufacture new receptors. If you take a break from the misery by using for a day, you turn off the forces that are moving you toward feeling better, delaying the process by days to weeks. To be direct, the quickest way to stop Suboxone and get back to zero opioid tolerance is to avoid opioids completely until you feel better.

Again, in my opinion, all of this is folly because the chance of staying clean is low. At minimum, a person must be completely free of any contacts who are using or who have access to opioids. The person should be actively involved in some time of recovery program. The person should have someone in his or her life who can act as a ‘reality check’ to speak up if the person starts to harbor resentments, or if the ego begins to grow out of control. If you don’t have these things at a minimum, consider just sticking on buprenorphine. You will save yourself a great deal of money, time, embarrassment, and who knows what else.

If you do stop buprenorphine, expect withdrawal to peak at about 4-7 days after you finally discontinue taking Suboxone, followed by slow recovery that accelerates each week. By four weeks, you will be done with the creepy crawly legs, and your energy will be starting to return. By two months, your sleep should be coming back—unless you are also stuck on benzos, which make sleep a big problem if you use them for more than very short-term.

By three months, you should be back to normal—assuming that you did not use opioids at all. And you will recover fastest if you get some exercise, eat right, and stay as active as possible, even when you don’t feel like it!
.
Read more at http://www.suboxonetalkzone.com/withdra ... KJQ4p5F.99

_________________
anyone can give up,
its the easiest thing in the world to do, but to
hold it together, when everyone would understand if you fell apart
That's TRUE STRENGTH
http://almostoneyearclean.blogspot.com/


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Fond Du Lac Psychiatry
Dr. Jeffrey Junig, M.D., Ph.D.

  • Board Certified Psychiatrist
  • Asst Clinical Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin

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