It is currently Sun Aug 20, 2017 10:47 pm



All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Our Sponsors





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri Feb 26, 2010 12:56 am 
Offline
Super Poster
Super Poster
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2010 11:36 pm
Posts: 102
Well, I celebrated one year of subutex/suboxone treatment on the 15th of February 2010, and life is certainly much better than it was 12 months ago. There have been a couple of bad experiences, mostly to do with my continuing lung problems which I firmly believe to have been caused by smoking crap heroin for the previous 8 years. I had a two week stay in hospital in November 2009 and another week long stay a fortnight ago.I was given steroids (prednisolone and others which made me swell up like the Marshmallow Man), antibiotics and nebulisers such as salbutamol and atrovent on both occasions. This is the price I pay for abusing my health for so long. COPD is a damn killer.
On the subject of hospitals, I found that the staff were reluctant to give me my daily suboxone, which I resolved by phoning my keyworker Mohammed at the Hounslow Substance Misuse Team center. He totally ripped the shit out of the doctors and ensured that I got my tab every morning without fail. Even then, the nurses would conveniently 'forget' to administer it, and I would have a pitched battle with them every morning until they finally unlocked the CD (controlled drug) cabinet and released it. It takes two members of staff to release a controlled drug, one to actually administer it and the other to witness the act. This is obviously to prevent the nurse from stealing the drug for their own use, a common problem so I understand.
As far as the HSMT goes, I have nothing but the highest praise for all the staff there. I could never have gotten clean without their help and kindness, much less be celebrating 12 months sobriety.Greatest thanks go to the aforementioned Mohammed, an extremely knowledgable and understanding young man, himself a clinical nurse specialising in addiction and rehabilitation techniques. He has helped me with issues besides the obvious ones concerning medication and staying clean, and has become a friend as well as a counsellor. He has also reduced the number of times I collect my meds from three days a week to one, a great improvement as I find the journey to and from the pharmacy physically exhausting.
Things are also much improved on the home front, my wife is so happy not to have a junkie mooching around the house all day. My sons are also proud of me for quitting, although I can't really take much credit for that. If not for my family I would have had no motivation for getting clean.
I am still on the same dose of 8 mg daily, although for the last month I have been breaking about 2 mg off the tab every day and saving it. I now have several whole tabs for future use or emergencies, which is very useful in case some problem arises. I don't want to resort to scoring a bag again, as I had to once when the pharmacy closed early one friday and I had no subs for a three day period. I plan to reduce still further starting this monday, perhaps by another milligram.
I purely love suboxone, it has given me back my life. I also love it because not only did it make withdrawal relatively painless, but as long as I take it I KNOW that there is no point in scoring and using, obviously because the junk will do nothing but make my throat sore.Having said this, I seem to be in a relative minority here in the UK, and I would like to explain why.
Over here, suboxone is often perceived by users not so much a cure as a means of taking a short break from junk. So many times I have heard this same old crap, that you can get clean for a couple of weeks, get your tolerance down, save some cash then get totally blasted once you stop taking the subs.This is to my mind totally the wrong attitude towards this wonderful medication, and is probably the reason why so many people here in Britain seem to relapse after a short time. Not only that, if you fail too many urine tests they WILL throw you off the program, you have to be serious about giving up or they will not waste time, energy and resources on you.
There are also many myths concerning suboxone here. Foremost is the one about the naloxone component. I have heard tales of somebody on suboxone walking into a room where others are chasing ( smoking gear) and going into withdrawal just from contact with the fumes, sometimes having to be hospitalised. Several people have told me this tale, but as always it happened to a friend of a friend of a friend, never to them personally. I always reply the same way i.e. HORSESHIT!!!
There are also stories about people getting their first dose and going into precipitated withdrawal for 72 hours or more. There may be some truth in this, as I have heard it first hand from about 5 people, but their doses all seemed to be very high considering the habits they had. Often they were given upwards of 24 mg as an initial dose, which does seem very high to me. Less is more in my experience, 16mg has no greater effect on me than 8mg and I would be very reluctant to experiment with a higher dose. Besides, doesn't the ceiling effect kick in at doses over 24mg? or have I got that wrong? because of these urban myths, many people are reluctant to use suboxone to get clean, and opt for methadone instead. Of course, most of them do this so that they can still use on top, in fact I personally know 4 people who do so. The ones who get 'take home' bottles of juice even sell it to buy gear, which is no more than getting the government to finance their habit when all is said and done.
Anyway, that's all I have to say for the moment, I just wanted to let you know that it is all worth it and life is for living.And to anyone who may be worried about whether being on suboxone is really 'being clean' I would point out that I was a terrible wreck of a man before starting treatment.Who cares if it's substituting one drug for another? It is CLEAN, LEGAL and LETS YOU LIVE A NORMAL LIFE AGAIN. You can't get ripped off, poisoned or arrested for it, now that's a real blessing.
And for anyone thinking of relapsing, just remember what life was like before...no money, lying (even to yourself) possibly stealing, and breaking your loved ones hearts. Now is there any better reason to stay clean? I cant think of one.
Love and peace to all,
Sneaky Elephant


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 26, 2010 7:20 am 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2010 10:03 pm
Posts: 991
Sneaky Elephant,

Thanks for sharing that information. It is interesting to hear some of the differences. I am sure that people in the US will certainly end up with its own population of suboxone users. Personally, I would never WANT to take methadone because to me a large majority of the suboxone benefit is NOT WORRYING about using drugs because they literally will have no effect. If I were on methadone I am pretty sure I would still be trying to score.

I agree family is most important and it is good to hear you have your sons in your life. That does make a huge difference in staying clean.

Another myth to dispell would be that suboxone gets you high. I was watching Celebrity Rehab a while back and that Amber was like "this is suboxone and this is the really good shit". My husband was watching and I just told him she has no idea what she is talking about. I seriously did not appreciate that. Grrrrr.

Congrats on 1 year!!!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 26, 2010 10:14 am 
Offline
Average Poster
Average Poster

Joined: Fri Jan 29, 2010 12:54 pm
Posts: 29
Congratulations, Sneaky Elephant! What a shame that you had to fight with the medical staff for your subs. Outrageous. But good for you for insisting on proper care.

And the main thing is that you're certainly healthier and happier, with a far better outlook for the future than you would have had without sobriety, complications notwithstanding.

Best wishes to you!


Top
 Profile  
 
Our Sponsors
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 26, 2010 11:15 am 
Congrats on one year Sneaky!! That is awesome stuff! Sorry you have some health problems to deal with....the price we pay for what we did to ourselves....and a reminder that we don't want to go back, can't go back to the way things were before.
I'm glad for you that your wife and kids are still around to see the progress you've made. I know you've mentioned them before and I know how much our loved ones mean to us in recovery. You really do find out who loves you the most when you go through this! Sadly, sometimes there aren't many people left around you even when you've gotten the proper help with your addiction. Those few who love us unconditionally certainly deserve a lot of credit for sticking by us through it all!
Anyway...again Congratulations on your one year!!


Top
  
 
 Post subject: Same Time Frame....
PostPosted: Fri Feb 26, 2010 11:17 am 
Offline
Super-Duper Poster
Super-Duper Poster
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 12, 2009 10:02 am
Posts: 308
Location: Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Hi There Sneaky,
Congrats on your 1 year Milestone!!!! You and I are about the same as far as time goes. I started on Suboxone on Feb. 2, 2009 and like you never felt better!!! I felt so good about quiting the opiates that I got myself into re-hab for Alcohol!!! I have been Sober for 8 1/2 months..... So I am a slowly recovering Alcoholic & slowly recovering Addict. " Clean & Sober" as they say :lol: ... Things are going well. Life continues to have its ups & downs but, I just try to keep an even keel and take it one day at a time!! I have not given that much thought about tapering yet. My doc says maybe in the summer but he's not pushing me at all.. I also go to therapy once a week and find that helps me as well... Anyway thats enough about me Congrats on your year anniversary, keep up the GOOD work. Best of luck & continued success on your Recovery!!!

God Bless
TW


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Our Sponsors
Suboxone Forum latest topics RSS feed Subscribe to the entire forum
 

 

 
Fond Du Lac Psychiatry
Dr. Jeffrey Junig, M.D., Ph.D.

  • Board Certified Psychiatrist
  • Asst Clinical Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group