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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2013 3:34 pm 
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So, I've been wanting to do this for a long time, figured the first day of 2013,
get some of the stuff marked off my to do list.........

so, I'll be adding things the next couple of days, and whenever I find something useful......
Feel free to add something, if it's something you have found useful or informative.

Thanks!!!

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PaD6Yn7moGI/youtube]





[youtube] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETf9LvCu88c[/youtube]








"suboxone education set" of videos on You tube,
they are really short, like less than 2 minutes. there's about 15. by DR. Randall Bock
he also has a whole bunch of "testimonials" from his patients, if you click "channels"


http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL ... 0Tm7z_m-HY

_________________
anyone can give up,
its the easiest thing in the world to do, but to
hold it together, when everyone would understand if you fell apart
That's TRUE STRENGTH
http://almostoneyearclean.blogspot.com/


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2013 3:37 pm 
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Suboxdoc's videos on youtube....

http://www.youtube.com/user/SuboxDoc/videos?view=0

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Ls1F6vNhYw[/youtube]





What happens IN your brain with addiction video


[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ULwv1RcfEqM[/youtube]

_________________
anyone can give up,
its the easiest thing in the world to do, but to
hold it together, when everyone would understand if you fell apart
That's TRUE STRENGTH
http://almostoneyearclean.blogspot.com/


Last edited by amber4.14.11 on Sat May 04, 2013 1:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2013 3:48 pm 
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I posted this article, just the other day, but I wanted to save it here, too. It's not very long, I cannot read anything very long, but I really liked it.
Here's the link----
http://www.thefix.com/content/stigma-ma ... atment9216




The Truth About Suboxone

Studies show that maintenance therapy is the most effective treatment for opiate addiction. So why are abstinence fundamentalists so bitterly against it?



By Maia Szalavitz

12/02/11

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The Great Suboxone Debate
Moderation vs. Abstinence: What's More Effective?
What are the negative side effects of Suboxone?
Suboxone Helps Oxy Addicts Kick the Habit


While reading Joshua Lyon’s recent account in "Jagged Little Pill Head" of recovering from opioid addiction, I was enraged by his characterization of buprenorphine (Subutex, Suboxone) as a “chemical crutch” and “the very drug that was keeping me from doing other drugs.” This outdated and stigmatizing attitude towards maintenance treatment can—and frequently does—kill hundreds of struggling addicts who depend on these meds to stay off the streets. Lyon is typical of a large contingent of so-called recovery experts—from Dr. Drew to many 12-step participants—who continue to publicly push this perspective, despite decades of evidence to the contrary.

That's why it was pleasantly surprising that the issue got a public airing on, of all places, late-night TV. Kristen Johnston, star of the '90s TV hit 3rd Rock From the Sun, was a guest on The David Letterman Show on Monday, discussing her new addiction and recovery memoir Guts, including a pull-no-punches account of how her daily Vicodin–cum–wine consumption ate a hole in her stomach and caused her guts to explode—a life-threatening moment that led her to get clean. Letterman asked her if she used any "pharmacological medications" to help her recover from her opiate addiction, and Johnston said that she sure as hell did and the drug was called Suboxone and it was very effective and anyone who had a problem with that could shove it. Well, that was her tone if not her exact words. Johnston's admission is undoubtedly a first for a celebrity on the recovery circuit.

Even the Betty Ford Center agrees that people taking daily methadone or buprenorphine should be considered every bit as "in recovery" as those who just “don’t drink and go to meetings.” A 2007 consensus panel to define recovery convened by that august facility put it plainly: "To be explicit, formerly opioid-dependent individuals who take naltrexone, buprenorphine or methadone as prescribed and are abstinent from alcohol and all other non-prescribed drugs would meet this consensus definition of sobriety."

So why do even people like Lyon—who benefited from bupe himself—continue to see maintenance as “cheating” and as some kind of limbo between the hell of active drug addiction and the heaven of abstinence-based recovery?

There are several reasons, but they all mostly boil down to the mistaken notion that people on maintenance are somehow “always high” or not “emotionally” sober. This misunderstanding rests on an ignorance of basic pharmacology. With most psychoactive drugs, the pattern of use has an enormous impact on the drug experience. This is abundantly clear with opioids. Take them irregularly in varying doses and you will relatively reliably experience a robust high. But take the same exact drug on a regular schedule at the same exact dose and you will develop a tolerance that makes getting high virtually impossible.


Some in abstinence-based recovery feel compelled to proselytize about the dangers of the substances they once could not live without. This “drug-free” rhetoric helps them avoid temptation. It also gives the added buzz of self-righteousness that comes from feeling superior to others.

Lyon’s claims about getting high on Suboxone are almost certainly related to taking it irregularly or in varying doses. Like any opioids, Suboxone and methadone can cause highs when taken this way.

Tolerance is why addicted people escalate the amount of drugs they take and often feel that they are always chasing—but rarely achieving—that elusive ecstasy they experienced early on. It is also why people on opioid maintenance, including heroin itself, can function without being cognitively, emotionally or physically impaired. Even car-driving performance has been found to be safe in reviews of the data on opioid-tolerant patients. Nonetheless abstinence proponents like Dr. Drew and addict authors like Lyons not only portray these medications as inferior, but implicitly or explicitly push addicts to stop taking them, even when the meds are working.

That can be deadly—as it apparently was for two of the patients Dr. Drew detoxed from maintenance, Mike Starr, the former bassist in Alice in Chains, and film and TV actor Jeff Conaway. Both victims of Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew died of overdose or related issues, the risk of which is very far reduced by maintenance treatment. Research repeatedly finds that when access to maintenance is reduced or eliminated, deaths from drug overdose rise, as do rates of infection with HIV, hepatitis C and other blood-borne diseases. In fact, patients on maintenance treatment have a death rate three to four times lower than those who leave it.

It is clear that maintenance saves lives.

Another misconception that fuels the stigma of maintenance in the recovery community is that the use of opioids is inherently “numbing” and therefore people on these drugs are emotionally deadened or at least diminished. There are two problems with this argument. First, tolerance to opioid effects often includes tolerance to this emotional distancing as well. Second, different people respond to opiate effects in different ways. Those who are highly emotionally sensitive may actually benefit from taking a chill pill; methadone or buprenorphine can allow them to react normally instead of overreacting to everyday experience. Paradoxically, being less oversensitive to their own emotions may make their behavior toward others more sensitive.

Because individual responses to opioids are extremely variable—opioid-receptor genes are among the brain's most heterogeneous—maintenance can be numbing for some people and not for others. You may find methadone uncomfortably distancing but buprenorphine effective, while I may find the opposite. The bottom line is that a drug that makes one person miserable can be magnificently beneficial for another.

Beyond the issues of pharmacology and individual variance, one final factor also comes into play in the widespread disdain of maintenance. This is the need of a certain type of person in recovery to demonize the drugs to which they were previously addicted in service of their own abstinence. Because they rightly fear relapse, some who favor abstinence-based recovery feel compelled to proselytize about the dangers of the substances they once felt they could not live without—and often continue to crave. This “anti-drug” or “drug-free” rhetoric helps them avoid temptation. It also gives the added buzz of self-righteousness that comes from feeling superior to others.

I certainly understand this small-minded, mean-spirited attitude; I’ve been guilty of it myself. However, the self-aware—and adult—approach is to distinguish what works for you and your own recovery from what may work for others.

It’s not necessary for maintenance to be bad to make abstinence good. Such black-and-white thinking about methadone and buprenorphine is both divisive and dangerous. Recovery requires acceptance—and that includes acceptance of a diverse range of recovery methods and experiences.

And if acceptance is beyond your reach, then the least you can do is keep your opinions to yourself.

Maia Szalavitz is a columnist at The Fix. She is also a health reporter at Time magazine online, and co-author, with Bruce Perry, of Born for Love: Why Empathy Is Essential—and Endangered (Morrow, 2010), and author of Help at Any Cost: How the Troubled-Teen Industry Cons Parents and Hurts Kids (Riverhead, 2006).


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BY Kristen Johnston

what a cool article. While I certainly didn't expect to be drawn into the "suboxone debate," now that I am, I'd like to say two things. One, Suboxone saved my life. And two...people who judge other people's recovery are pathetic.
Isn't the WHOLE POINT not to use?
Here's what some people don't understand: Unlike other addictions, opiate withdrawal lasts up to SIX MONTHS. I call it being hit, over & over again, by a tsunami of tsorrow.
I know, without a doubt, that if I hadn't had suboxone, I would have relapsed many times...and likely would be dead.
To me, it doesn't matter if doing 20 cartwheels every morning, praying, or taking suboxone helps someone kick their horrific addiction.
STOP JUDGING, and instead perhaps take a gander at how your own recovery is going.

***(there's a lot more comments, this one just happened to be right there, so I copied it , too)***

_________________
anyone can give up,
its the easiest thing in the world to do, but to
hold it together, when everyone would understand if you fell apart
That's TRUE STRENGTH
http://almostoneyearclean.blogspot.com/


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2013 4:00 pm 
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SAMSHA Series of videos

Here's the first three, on triggers and cravings....
there is 6 total, link to the youtube page, at the bottom

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZlPCEIKGaD0[/youtube]



[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43SfGbtzyp0[/youtube]



[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VyGTJK35SIE[/youtube]


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=etH7TgiybLI

_________________
anyone can give up,
its the easiest thing in the world to do, but to
hold it together, when everyone would understand if you fell apart
That's TRUE STRENGTH
http://almostoneyearclean.blogspot.com/


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2013 4:09 pm 
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[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dkAY8m-uJI0[/youtube]



[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQPc8oNnrO8[/youtube]



[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t934V54b2DE[/youtube]



There's six of these as well.......

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VCTiLVEPlk (link to video 4)

here's the "SAMSHA YouTube channel" browe videos page

http://www.youtube.com/user/SAMHSA/vide ... rid&view=1

I've been watching the "prevention" series, it talks a lot about kids, teens, etc
I'm really interested in making sure this cycle ends with me........

_________________
anyone can give up,
its the easiest thing in the world to do, but to
hold it together, when everyone would understand if you fell apart
That's TRUE STRENGTH
http://almostoneyearclean.blogspot.com/


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 Post subject: ty
PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2013 9:47 am 
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thanks for taking the time to do this... some good info that i needed to see/hear.
ty u rock!


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 1:20 am 
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ya thanks" got some thing out of this.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2013 5:35 pm 
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8) Thanks for the kind words, guys 8)

Suboxone Treatment (results of the only study I've found)
In three previous posts I have reviewed several aspects of prescription opioid abuse including posts on epidemiology, toxicology and clinical pathways to abuse.

Given the growing numbers of individuals with prescription opioid abuse, safe and effective treatment options become increasingly important.

Opioid withdrawal can be quite painful and often leads to resumption of opioid use. Treatment of opioid withdrawal can include non-opioid drugs or opiod drugs that target withdrawal symptoms.

Symptomatic withdrawal treatment alone results in high relapse rates. This outcome has produced efforts to find more effective long-term treatments for prescription opioid abusers.

Short or long-term opioid substitution treatment appears to produce an incremental improvement in outcomes. Methodone substitution or substitution with the combined drug buprenorphine and naloxone (Suboxone) provide two options for clinicians and patients.

Buprenorphine is classified as a partial opioid agonist stimulating the opioid receptor with limited euphoric effect. Naloxone is felt to reduce the misuse of the combined drug compound by blocking/reducing euphoria with intravenous administration.

A recent study examined the effectiveness of Suboxone in a group of 653 outpatients seeking treatment for prescription opioid dependence. The key elements of the design of this study included:
Phase one: 2-week stablization on buprenorphine-naloxone, 2-week taper and 8-week follow-up
Phase two: Individuals who relapsed after phase one entered a longer 12-week stabilization on buprenorphine-naloxone followed by a 4-week taper and 8-week follow-up
Adjunctive counseling: Half the subjects received adjunctive counseling using a manual-based program emphasizing education, skills training and life-style modification.
Outcome Assessment: During the follow-up period abstinence was measured by urine-test verified self report

Only 7% of subjects achieved a successful outcome by the end of phase one. At the end of the treatment phase of phase 2, 49% of subjects were rated as having a successful outcome. However, after phase 2 tapering successful outcome rates dropped to 9%. Adjunctive counseling did not appear to improve outcomes in either phase.

The authors note the study supports use of Suboxone with a primary medical management approach (without a formal substance abuse counseling component) in the clinician's office. Approximately 50% of users will experience a successful outcome during treatment with Suboxone.

However, with the high relapse rates after the taper in phase 2 of the study, the study authors note: "What length of buprenorphine-naloxone treatment, if any, would lead to substantially better outcomes during a taper?" This study supports a longer term treatment trial using six months or a year of Suboxone treatment.

Only a minority of clinicians are certified to give Suboxone in the U.S. It requires a specific 8 hour training course before certification. Suboxone costs about $10 per day and this may limit it's use. Nevertheless, it provided opioid prescription abusers and their clinicians an important treatment option.



LINK
http://brainposts.blogspot.com/2012/01/ ... ption.html

_________________
anyone can give up,
its the easiest thing in the world to do, but to
hold it together, when everyone would understand if you fell apart
That's TRUE STRENGTH
http://almostoneyearclean.blogspot.com/


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 Post subject: Link Master
PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2013 12:51 pm 
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Amber is the Link Master ;) It didn't take long to figure this one out.

Haha,


WTBF


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2013 8:56 am 
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the videos are working again


complete list of really good videos......
http://www.youtube.com/user/SuboxDoc







part two.....
[youtube] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IIZNXl2J68c [/youtube]

_________________
anyone can give up,
its the easiest thing in the world to do, but to
hold it together, when everyone would understand if you fell apart
That's TRUE STRENGTH
http://almostoneyearclean.blogspot.com/


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2013 8:59 am 
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but WAIT,,, there's more!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!










_________________
anyone can give up,
its the easiest thing in the world to do, but to
hold it together, when everyone would understand if you fell apart
That's TRUE STRENGTH
http://almostoneyearclean.blogspot.com/


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 17, 2013 10:12 am 
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Medical article on treating suboxone patients, after or before surgery, or in an emergency. Also hits on methadone maintenance.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/article ... s17732.pdf



here is also what I call Dr. Junig's follow up on it

http://suboxonetalkzone.com/bupe.pain.pdf

_________________
anyone can give up,
its the easiest thing in the world to do, but to
hold it together, when everyone would understand if you fell apart
That's TRUE STRENGTH
http://almostoneyearclean.blogspot.com/


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 08, 2015 11:20 pm 
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Thanks for all of the information and link above it truly helps :)


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