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 Post subject: No doctor will see me!
PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2016 7:03 am 
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I am currently encountering a very strange problem. I have been on sub for about two years now for an over-the-counter codeine addiction (I am from the UK where codeine containing products are available over the counter. I have no issue with this, I think they should be as for most people they are very effective for short term pain, but if, as regulations here now stipulate, they are for three days use only, then the pack sizes should be restricted to three days worth. Anyway, I do NOT live the kind of chaotic existence some people with addictions do. I am doing well and haven't touched codeine since starting sub. I am getting ready to begin reducing after Christmas too :)

My issue is that my usual doctors will not see me with ANY medical issue, and have said I have to see a doctor with the treatment clinic!. In September I had a really nasty viral bug that caused me some really unusual symptoms. I usually never go to the doctor with a bug unless I suspect a bacterial infection. This bug was no 'usual' bug, I felt terrible. I kept getting pins and needles in my hands and feet, it felt like someone was shoving a red hot knife into every single joint in my body, my face kept going numb, I had a sore throat, sneezing and coughing, I was burning up with a fever and I was delirious, I kept thinking it was a hot summer's day when it was a nippy late September day!. I couldn't put a sentence together and when I did it was pretty incoherent. I even saw things that were not there, it felt like insects were crawling all over me, I felt very dizzy and disorientated, my ears hurt, I was shivering uncontrollably, my head felt like it was about to explode, I couldn't take it anymore so I dragged myself to the doctors.

I told them what was happening the best I could, I explained most of the strange symptoms. I was told, without ANY kind of physical examination such as having my temperature checked or being checked for a rash, that it was the result of 'abusing drugs' and passed back to the addiction clinic. They don't operate like a GP practice, so nobody contacted me and I was left to endure this for another week, by then I had given up. Now my GP practice will not see me regarding any issue, and have taken the stance that any health issue I may present is due to 'drug abuse'. We even specifically asked them if this was the case, and they said yes. I know there is nothing that can be done for a viral bug, it has to run it's miserable course unfortunately. I never ask for medications, I always let the doctor decide on what action, if any, needs to be taken.

We later discovered that other people we knew had also come down with exactly the same virus and exactly the same symptoms!. :twisted:

So I can only imagine what would happen if I ever became seriously ill with something that requires urgent medical attention like one of the serious conditions they have numerous posters up warning patients about such as Meningitis and Sepsis. If I presented myself in a similar condition again, and it was serious this time, would I just be left to die?. :roll:


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2016 2:14 pm 
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That is really bad Happenstance. To be broadbrused like that only because you took some codeine a bit too often.

Do you think it has anything to do with GB having socialized medicine? So many citizens of the U.S. want that but I'm wary of it due to stories like yours. It sounds good on paper but when treatment is needed you're left out in the cold.

Sorry, that got off track. All I can recommend is that the squeaky wheel gets the grease. Keep buggin' them until you get some results.

r

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2016 5:02 pm 
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Wow wee! I hope that terrible virus stays over there. Just kidding. That was some virus though. And they just blew you off and said it was due to your previous drug addiction? Man, You do need to go to your Dr. office and put up a fuss. That is unacceptable. By the way, I agree with you about if they are going to sell codeine over the counter and it's recommendation is to use it for 3 days only, then it should only be sold a packet of 3 days worth. Good point. Maybe try to get that in the works to be changed for the better. That way people would be less likely to run into the problem of misusing or getting addicted if they only have 3 days worth.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2016 7:15 pm 
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rule62 wrote:
That is really bad Happenstance. To be broadbrused like that only because you took some codeine a bit too often.

Do you think it has anything to do with GB having socialized medicine? So many citizens of the U.S. want that but I'm wary of it due to stories like yours. It sounds good on paper but when treatment is needed you're left out in the cold.

Sorry, that got off track. All I can recommend is that the squeaky wheel gets the grease. Keep buggin' them until you get some results.

r


Most probably. The way things are going here is drug addiction treatment is sold off from the NHS and being taken over by private companies/charities (profit making charities, with millionaire CEOs lol). Since this began, we've got alcoholics being forced into dangerous detoxes with no medical support as these agencies see Benzodiazepines, which are frequently required by alcohol users who want to stop drinking, as the devil's spawn. There are patients being cut off Methadone and Subutex at an alarming rate, and being pushed back to crime and rough sleeping. Both crime AND rough sleeping have skyrocketed in the past couple of years since this mass auction of addiction treatment services.

I am currently trying to sort the doctor issue but it's now a case of buck-passing between the two.

That virus was hell on Earth, and apparently due to 'drug abuse'. Very sad, and I have since found out I am by no means alone when it comes to this very issue. The consensus is that because I had an issue with codeine, I am merely marked as an 'opiate addict' and thrown into the same basket as chaotic substance users, which in my case couldn't be further from the truth. We found out that virus was doing the rounds, and caused several other people exactly the same symptoms and worse, a couple of people landed up in the hospital with a stupidly high fever. I never ask for medications, and a two minute physical exam would have told them it was a nasty virus for which there is no treatment other than time. I wasn't checked for a rash, throat infection, fever or anything, and I even asked why I had spent the past two nights burning up/freezing cold, seeing things that were not there, had the sensation of insects all over me, talking gibberish, asking where I was, feeling terribly disorientated, dizzy etc. I just got told 'that's from 'all' the drugs you've misused. :roll:


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2016 12:29 am 
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There are problems with every health system. I think that the less familiar a person is with a country's health system, the better it looks. I've heard many people in the US rave about Canada's system, and I've met Canadians who are amazed at the concept of making an appointment with an orthopedist within a week of a knee injury. In the US, the cost of health care has gone up very fast since the 'affordable' care act was passed; my own policy (for two people) went from about $8000 in 2006 to $14,000 the last two years-- and also added an $8000 per person deductible. United Health Care is leaving Wisconsin, so my policy for next year will cost $19,000, with a $5000-per-person deductible.

I'm digressing too... but I just reviewed the numbers for my new policy, and I needed to vent...

The problem you mention, happenstance, occurs here as well but in a different way. Addiction treatment is not 'carved out' as it is with the NHS, but doctors apply similar attitudes as what you described. People will start to describe symptoms and the doctor will cut them off and say 'I'm not giving you any pain meds!!'. And even when the patient explains that he/she isn't asking for narcotics, the doctor remains in a defensive position that often gets in the way of an accurate diagnosis.

The other problem is that since the Harrison Act of 1913, doctors have left treatment of opioid dependence to other health professionals. Lately there have been articles in a few medical journals 'shaming' doctors for not getting involved in medication-assisted treatments... but many doctors see that type of work as 'not worth the headache' that comes with treating addictions.

I enjoy working in the addiction field very much as far as treating patients... but many docs who prescribe buprenorphine medications complain of getting mixed messages about their work. On one hand, there are calls by some programs for greater effort toward treating the epidemic of opioid dependence-- but on the other hand, doctors feel persecuted by licensing boards, criticized by law enforcement, and shamed by pharmacists for getting involved in addiction treatment.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2016 12:04 pm 
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I
Quote:
enjoy working in the addiction field very much as far as treating patients... but many docs who prescribe buprenorphine medications complain of getting mixed messages about their work. On one hand, there are calls by some programs for greater effort toward treating the epidemic of opioid dependence-- but on the other hand, doctors feel persecuted by licensing boards, criticized by law enforcement, and shamed by pharmacists for getting involved in addiction treatment.


That's terribly depressing. I go to a local clinic and most of the people working there....mostly recovering addicts I'm sure...are very nice and sympathetic. The doctor too seems to be a nice guy. But I"ve noticed the office hides behind a dentist's sign, presumably so they won't be singled out by other professionals in the building for being bad for business...or not a good influence in the neighborhood or some such thing.

I'm optimistic this will slowly change. More and more, even from politicians and they're the last to figure anything out, there's a calling for less emphasis on criminality and more on the medical aspects of what surely is a terrible disease.

I can't think of anything more foolish than the war on drugs which continues to this day. It's unspeakable that so many people have died in Mexico. If that happened here we'd be talking about nothing else.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2016 8:51 am 
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godfrey wrote:
I
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enjoy working in the addiction field very much as far as treating patients... but many docs who prescribe buprenorphine medications complain of getting mixed messages about their work. On one hand, there are calls by some programs for greater effort toward treating the epidemic of opioid dependence-- but on the other hand, doctors feel persecuted by licensing boards, criticized by law enforcement, and shamed by pharmacists for getting involved in addiction treatment.


That's terribly depressing. I go to a local clinic and most of the people working there....mostly recovering addicts I'm sure...are very nice and sympathetic. The doctor too seems to be a nice guy. But I"ve noticed the office hides behind a dentist's sign, presumably so they won't be singled out by other professionals in the building for being bad for business...or not a good influence in the neighborhood or some such thing.

I'm optimistic this will slowly change. More and more, even from politicians and they're the last to figure anything out, there's a calling for less emphasis on criminality and more on the medical aspects of what surely is a terrible disease.

I can't think of anything more foolish than the war on drugs which continues to this day. It's unspeakable that so many people have died in Mexico. If that happened here we'd be talking about nothing else.



Just look at what's happening in the Philippines with Duterte and all the killings of "drug dealers". He's murdered 3000+ of his people so far..and that number is rising. ...
Political opponents...labeled drug dealers and killed. Any type of opponent..labeled and killed.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2016 3:44 pm 
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I have found that disturbing, too, Jonathan. Duterte was elected as a populist demagogue who made somewhat outrageous promises to eradicate crime and kill drug dealers. And in general he is quite popular. I wonder sometimes if it is the time of the populist leaders with outrageous tendencies. It's interesting to speculate on why that is attractive to so many people.

Godfrey, I probably missed this before. Are you saying that you go to a dentist for buprenorphine treatment? I have never heard of that before. But a DDS is a doctor, correct? So is there any reason that a dentist couldn't be a buprenorphine provider? Godfrey, do they do anything with peoples' teeth? I find that unusual!

Amy

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