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 Post subject: Decreased Hba1c
PostPosted: Tue Dec 15, 2015 11:10 am 
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Joined: Wed Dec 09, 2015 12:41 am
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Location: Syracuse, NY
Dr. Junig -

I have been a type 1 diabetic for over 20 years and have been utilizing insulin pump therapy for about a decade. My Hba1c level has never been lower than 9%, (an average blood glucose of 170-250) since my diagnosis in '93. Upon starting 8mg of suboxone my blood glucose levels have drastically decreased to 6.5% which equivocates to levels ranging from 100-150 and I could not be happier. I never experienced lower glucose readings during my active addiction. I'm wondering if it has to do with the chemical compounds found in buprenorphine that are responsible for the lower glucose.

Is it reasonable to surmize that the worry and stressors from my full-time job (active opiate addiction) of finding more pills, H or whatever other narcotic I could get my hands on was responsible for increased cortisol and other adrenal hormones were to blame for years of uncontrolled glucose levels? It feels like my chemistry has reached a level of homeostasis since my buprenorphine induction that I have truly never known or felt before.

Thanks in advance,
David


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 Post subject: Re: Decreased Hba1c
PostPosted: Wed Dec 16, 2015 9:25 pm 
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I suspect you are exactly right. I would expect the drop in stress and consequent drop in cortisol to be positive factors. There may also be benefits to having a constant level of endorphin activity, and becoming fully tolerant to that activity. I don't remember whether endorphins and endorphin pathways directly activate glycolysis (breakdown of starch into glucose) or gluconeogenesis (the production of glucose from other compounds)... but since endorphin activity generally prepares the body for 'fight or flight', I would think that an increase in glucose would be part of the process (glucose is used more efficiently than other stores of energy during emergencies).

Whatever the case, that's great news about your Hb A1C. For other readers, Hg A1C is a substance formed by the combination of blood sugar and hemoglobin, that provides a measure of the average blood sugar level--- which correlates with the damage caused by diabetes to the kidneys, to nerve fibers, and to the retina-- along with other parts of the body.

I hope things continue to get better!


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 Post subject: Re: Decreased Hba1c
PostPosted: Thu Dec 17, 2015 5:43 pm 
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Thanks for the reply. This medication is nothing short of a wonder drug for me in so many ways. I look forward to continuing to fight the good fight, many thanks.


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Fond Du Lac Psychiatry
Dr. Jeffrey Junig, M.D., Ph.D.

  • Board Certified Psychiatrist
  • Asst Clinical Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin

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