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 Post subject: 18 days off suboxone
PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2009 7:35 pm 
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i was prevously on oxycodone for about 3 years then suboxone for about a year and half ..im 23 years old...18 days ago i decided i had enough of feeling tired and drained on my low dose of suboxone, i was at 2 mg a day...so i just decided to jump off...i currently have no energy ,dont sleep for more then 4 hours and i cannot focus to the point where im scared to drive...i train mixed martial arts and i havent been able to go sense i stoped my suboxone for lack of energy and focus...i dont want to get hurt..u need to stay sharp when fighting...i make myself lift weights and run everyday...i was curious to see if anyone could give me some insight on how long this might last..im worried that becuase i didnt taper lower i just screwed myself worse...but i wanted to make it go fast so i could get back to training..i kno it is going to take time im just curious if anyone has any helpfull info about if i came off of it wrong and what i should do now that im at day 18...any help would be appreciated


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 03, 2009 1:40 am 
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Just hang in there and it will get better. My doctor gave me ambien for the insomnia, which helped a lot. Once I had a week or so of sleeping through the night my energy level was better. Getting exercise helps too so it's good that you're doing that.

I've been off for 2 months and I'm feeling pretty normal at this point. In fact, I've been feeling pretty good. I think the withdrawal is different for everyone so you'll just have to get through it. It will get better though.

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 03, 2009 9:01 am 
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Stopping at 2mgs is rough and it would of been easier to taper as low as possible but that's not an option now. Your past the worst so just look forward to feeling better everyday. Take alot of vitamines especially. Your B's, C, and E and be sure to get enough calcium and magnesium alot of water and potassium thru banannas or another source because that seems to help with the leg pain


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 03, 2009 10:54 am 
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thanx alot guys..and too hear sumone saying they are feeling normal after 2 months really raises my spirits..i actually slept for 4 hours got up and went bak to bed for another 4...hoping im heading down the other side of the mountain for this week..i find that meditating really helps you to fall asleep..i think monday i will go bak to training..what a rough road, but what doesnt kill us only makes us stronger...they say once u experience death up close u can truely begin to appriciate life..and opiate withdrawal is as close to that and torture that i think u can get...so mayb sometimes this is what we needed


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 03, 2009 12:58 pm 
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I agree with the others-- you are more than halfway there. Remember that you are not just coming off Suboxone; you are coming off the meds you were taking before the Suboxone, that you didn't come off before. That is one reason for the different withdrawal experiences-- a person who used opiates for 10 years and then took Suboxone for a year is going to have it tougher than a person who used for a few months, then took Suboxone for a year.

Suboxone has no 'healing' properties; it induces remission of addiction, but whatever personality issues were present before using opiates are likely still around, and usually worse. For example, yesterday I was talking to a patient who is having tons of anxiety off opiates-- he wants to be the person 'he used to be'. But his image of who he used to be is all distorted; he remembers the person who had tons of manic energy, who never cared about being stared at or in the spotlight. But that was all fake; that was him on opiates. Even worse, he was completely forgetting all of the other parts of 'who he was' at that time-- the person who got up in the AM frantic for opiates to avoid w/d, the person who stole money from family members, the person who laid in bed for days if opiates were not available. And when we tried to see who he was before the opiates, he had little memory of that time-- it was long ago, and he was much younger then-- but by looking at his high school experiences it was clear that he was a very self-conscious person--which is probably one reason that opiates were so appealing to him.

My point with all this is that sometimes a person will blame Suboxone withdrawal for anxiety, lack of motivation, depression, etc, when in reality that is who the person was before using-- and who the person still is now. It sounds like you know how to motivate yourself; realize that part of 'getting better' will involve kicking yourself out of bed and acting 'as if' you felt better. Again, it sounds like you have this area covered.

The MAIN thing, though-- is that opiate dependence is a chronic, relapsing illness. The large majority of opiate addicts return to active using. And ALL of them say, and believe, "I will NEVER go back to that way of life!" With that in mind, the best thing you can do is always keep a healthy fear-- or better yet, terror-- about opiate use. Relapse never comes back with a sign on it that says 'relapse'-- it always comes as something that might be a little shady, but that you are able to rationalize. Then there is another step and a little more rationalization. Staying clean requires very rigid rules that you just don't violate-- ever. You get to set the rules-- the sober side of you, that is... but then you must abide by those rules. The best sign of impending relapse is rationalization.

Take care of yourself, and let us all know how things are going from time to time.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 03, 2009 3:53 pm 
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suboxdoc wrote:
I agree with the others-- you are more than halfway there. Remember that you are not just coming off Suboxone; you are coming off the meds you were taking before the Suboxone, that you didn't come off before. That is one reason for the different withdrawal experiences-- a person who used opiates for 10 years and then took Suboxone for a year is going to have it tougher than a person who used for a few months, then took Suboxone for a year.

Suboxone has no 'healing' properties; it induces remission of addiction, but whatever personality issues were present before using opiates are likely still around, and usually worse. For example, yesterday I was talking to a patient who is having tons of anxiety off opiates-- he wants to be the person 'he used to be'. But his image of who he used to be is all distorted; he remembers the person who had tons of manic energy, who never cared about being stared at or in the spotlight. But that was all fake; that was him on opiates. Even worse, he was completely forgetting all of the other parts of 'who he was' at that time-- the person who got up in the AM frantic for opiates to avoid w/d, the person who stole money from family members, the person who laid in bed for days if opiates were not available. And when we tried to see who he was before the opiates, he had little memory of that time-- it was long ago, and he was much younger then-- but by looking at his high school experiences it was clear that he was a very self-conscious person--which is probably one reason that opiates were so appealing to him.

My point with all this is that sometimes a person will blame Suboxone withdrawal for anxiety, lack of motivation, depression, etc, when in reality that is who the person was before using-- and who the person still is now. It sounds like you know how to motivate yourself; realize that part of 'getting better' will involve kicking yourself out of bed and acting 'as if' you felt better. Again, it sounds like you have this area covered.

The MAIN thing, though-- is that opiate dependence is a chronic, relapsing illness. The large majority of opiate addicts return to active using. And ALL of them say, and believe, "I will NEVER go back to that way of life!" With that in mind, the best thing you can do is always keep a healthy fear-- or better yet, terror-- about opiate use. Relapse never comes back with a sign on it that says 'relapse'-- it always comes as something that might be a little shady, but that you are able to rationalize. Then there is another step and a little more rationalization. Staying clean requires very rigid rules that you just don't violate-- ever. You get to set the rules-- the sober side of you, that is... but then you must abide by those rules. The best sign of impending relapse is rationalization.

Take care of yourself, and let us all know how things are going from time to time.


wow. now that is a top knotch post. very informative.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 03, 2009 11:01 pm 
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[font=Comic Sans MS] [/font] i agree, this site is awesome.i just got more information here then i ever did at my doctors who never even remembered who i was


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