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 Post subject: Re: RsjxRsj's Post
PostPosted: Sat Oct 15, 2011 4:09 am 
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I must admit that everyone I come across who detox's from sub all complain of this horrible extreme depression from bup which seems to last forever..Surely you would have assumed weanign down to such a low dose as 0.25 one will feel somewhat semi-normal by day 20?...To be honest this is all very discouraging to me as I've been taking sub for 5+years now...I also have to admit I have yet to come across anybody who tapered sub and stayed clean. Am talking about outside of Internet and on other forums around the net too. Does it really make any difference tapering to such a low dose and tapering slowly? doesnt it just mean more time on sub? all am seeing is people feeling really bad even weaning down slowly to a low dose..Personally I dont feel much different now that am on 0.5/0.4..I still feel the same mentally when I was on 6mg..I do sleep less and do actually feel a little better but not enough to feel like am healing or feeling any difference..And mentally I feel no emotions at all.. Am sorry but this is all discouraging to me..Have I really got so much sub stacked in me that it will take me years to feel even semi-decent?..m suprised folks weaning to 0.2 and still feeling the same as one would cold-turkey or jump off a high dose..


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 15, 2011 1:33 pm 
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I jumped(no taper,just said enough is enough) from 6-8mg daily dose of suboxone which I took for 6 years almost 6 months ago and still have moderate depression. Each day is a struggle, but I have to say it has gotten better and I am embracing the challenge each day to better myself as a person. In my opinion today, subject to change but there is so little info out on the subject and success stories, but I believe after 10 plus years of daily abuse to the brain it will take some time to heal and wanting to feel normal again in 1 month is almost ridiculous, hell 1 year might be pushing it. But just pour all your energy(I know hard to come by coming off this stuff, I know, but you can do it!) into doing things for yourself to feel better, eating right,exercise,hobbies, and anything that gets your mind off feeling like death. Just think if you sat on the couch everyday for 10 years feeding yourself crap all the time, you would become obese and sick, I firmly believe that is what happens to the addicted persons brain, we just can't see it, and we are so use to feeling good from our drugs we don't want to endure any pain, that is why so many people relapse they never give themselves the proper time to heal which I am betting is at least 1 solid year and probably 2 years would be more realistic, and this is with no relapse, any relapse will just undue your hard work and the brain will have to heal all over again,plus your opening up the possibility of your addiction to fire up again and we know where that leads. Hang in there guys it can be done if you want it, think of the story you will have, Do you believe in Miracles? Just do it! Healing takes time. And we have all done a ton of damage to our brain, but it will heal.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 15, 2011 2:56 pm 
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Hey jcb1981 -

I'm so sorry that you're hurting right now. I know all too well the feeling that things will never get better and than you will always feel the way you're feeling now. I have struggled with clinical depression for over 20 years, so believe me when I say I hear you.

You have gotten much great advice already on this thread. The only things that I would add to what everyone has already said are these:

If you continue to feel hopelessly depressed, please see your doctor. There are many physical issues that can contribute to feeling the way you do. Two that come to mind are thyroid issues and vitamin D deficiency. Opiates can have an effect on the endocrine system, and many people in North America are vitamin D deficient. Both conditions are easily diagnosed with a blood test and are easy to treat as well. Aside from that, addiction and depression are often co-occurring disorders. Many addicts are simply self-medicating underlying emotional issues. If that is the case, there are treatments that can help: therapy, like CBT or DBT and medications if needed.

I quit Suboxone in August 2009 and have remained free of opiates. I remember that I felt about 80% of normal by 30days off and 100% by 60 days. Some things that really helped me through the withdrawal phase were exercise, spending time with friends, eating very healthfully, meditation, reading inspiring books, yoga, and I drank Kombucha Tea every day. I don't know why, but that shit was like MAGIC to me when I was detoxing.

And when you're just too crapped out to do anything else, a surefire way to get those endorphins flowing is to LAUGH. I watched so much stand-up comedy, found so many funny websites, and watched like every comedy on Netflix. I surrounded myself with people who could make me laugh. I even made a thread about it:

Laughter is the Best Medicine

I cannot stress to you enough how much better laughing can make you feel. 20 minutes on Damn You Autocorrect can lift my mood all day.

Lastly, here is something that I wrote about 4 months after I quit Sub. I remember at that time feeling incredibly grateful for the life lessons I learned during my time on Sub, during my taper and throughout my detox. My father passed away suddenly 3 months after I quit Suboxone and my newly found strength was sorely put to the test - but I survived with my recovery intact.

Diary of a Quitter wrote:
Suboxone withdrawal is probably one of the biggest topics on this forum. Lots of people have questions about it, some have horror stories, many are anxious, and a few sail through with no problems whatsoever.

I totally get why we freak out about going through withdrawal. Most of us have been through horrible cold-turkey withdrawal experiences during our addictions and have no desire to go through that again. Sometimes we don't get accurate information about what stopping Suboxone will be like before we start treatment, and then we read horror stories about quitting and we get scared. Maybe some of us are impatient to be done with treatment and aren't sure we have the patience or commitment to taper slowly, and still others are at a point in our treatment where we even want to consider EVER stopping.

And I think that I speak for the majority of us when I say that we didn't get addicted to opiates because we're the kind of people who are So Very Good At Dealing With Discomfort. We all know those people - they never call in sick to work, never go to the doctor for anything less than pneumonia and consinder taking an aspirin a moral failing. We are not them, and the looming prospect of suffering a month or more of withdrawal symptoms strikes the fear of god into our addicty hearts.

So I'm here to tell you that there is something positive to be found in the Suboxone withdrawal experience. That's right, there are reasons that I am actually GLAD that I went through the process of tapering down and stopping Suboxone! So without further delay, here you go:

1. The taper process gave me many opportunities to develop new tools for dealing with difficulties. I learned that I could in fact survive and function even when I didn't feel that great. Amazing, I know, and totally true. Life does go on even when it's not all bluebirds and happiness. We are more resilient than we realize.

2. Tapering and withdrawal sucked just enough to remind me that I don't ever want to have to go through that again. If quitting Suboxone was totally easy and painless...well then it might be a lot easier to rationalize just one more binge, know what I mean? Going through this process reinforced the fact that this is a serious illness that I'm dealing with and I shouldn't take it lightly.

3. I learned that having a plan and a support network in place really does make all the difference. There were definitely moments when I thought I might just stop and suffer through stronger withdrawals just to get it over with sooner, but I stuck with my schedule and was smart about choosing my time to stop the medication. Being patient and following through are really important life skills, so any chance to practice them is a blessing.

4. I discovered the true value of a positive attitude. Sometimes you have to fake it until it becomes real, and that's TOTALLY OK. Whining about how hard it is like you're the first person to ever go through a painful healing process isn't going to do you any good. I would often think about the horrible shit cancer patients go through in order to survive their disease...and then I would count my blessings.

5. Knowing that I made it through this experience has increased my confidence in my ability to cope, and that's a beautiful thing. The only way to grow and get better at life is to challenge ourselves, and having suceeded in this challenge makes me feel great. I feel like I can handle pretty much anything life throws my way, as long as I remember all the stuff I learned during the 2 years I was on Sub.

http://suboxforum.com/viewtopic.php?t=1280


I know that right now you might not be in a place to really hear these things, and that's fine. Maybe it sounds like a lot of trite b.s. from where you're sitting. I'm certainly not saying that you have to try to adopt these attitudes or be like me or anything like that. You are where you are and we each have to find our path through the mire. Just know that I was once where you are now and I made it through to the other side. It does get better.

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 15, 2011 4:06 pm 
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What if there are no underlying issues? what if this depression is the result of sub? I know people personally who never had any issues with depression before sub yet suffer it badly when they detox from sub, cannot be a concidence at all...Sure some may have prior issues but many dont either..I think time is the best healer but are people including myself willing to spend months and months and even years waiting to recover from a sub detox? I dont know.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 15, 2011 4:10 pm 
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What medicines are CBT and DBT if I may ask?

thank you.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 15, 2011 6:39 pm 
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Redemption wrote:
What if there are no underlying issues? what if this depression is the result of sub? I know people personally who never had any issues with depression before sub yet suffer it badly when they detox from sub, cannot be a concidence at all...Sure some may have prior issues but many dont either..I think time is the best healer but are people including myself willing to spend months and months and even years waiting to recover from a sub detox? I dont know.


It's totally possible that the depression is withdrawal related; but if it continues without improvement, it can't hurt to check for underlying issues. If the depression is caused only by withdrawal, it should get better with time. If it doesn't get better and is intolerable or significantly impacting quality of life, seeking some kind of treatment is probably a good idea.


CBT and DBT are therapy-based treatments for depression (and other conditions). Cognitive-behavioral therapy and Dialectical-behavioral therapy, both can be incredibly helpful when done under the guidance of a skilled therapist.

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 15, 2011 7:22 pm 
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Hang in there. I know everyone says that. I honestly think it really is going to be quite some time for addicts to adjust to being sober and feeling again. I can't speak for everyone, but I know this sub use has been a crutch for me while I get back on track-or rather get ON track.
Itll never be easy and it will take time. That is what life is all about-a process.
Reach out, get some therapy and resources. Maybe pick up something new like yoga or hiking ( i dont know where you live) but just something that you have never tried before-
much love


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 Post subject: Depression
PostPosted: Sat Oct 15, 2011 7:26 pm 
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Suboxone or Norco, I got depressed withdrawing from either one. My doctor gave me Effexor which works quite well. Once it is all far behind, then a taper of off the AD is next.

Any opiate is a mood lifter. Wasn't there a study years ago about that subject, treatment of depression with morphine or some other opiate?

Hatmaker is right on. Seek professional help if you are suffering.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2011 7:47 pm 
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How are you making out Juan?


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2011 11:06 pm 
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JCB, it sounds like you're still suffering withdrawals. Opiate withdrawal can make the most hardened of men cry over the smallest things. Give yourself a few more days okay? I always found that once I got through the emotional detox stage, I spent months as a bit of an emotional cripple and unable to cry. Some people told me that effect can last years. Addiction can make us think we're really "hard-assed", and that front takes time to fall.

Depression is also a common complaint in post-acute withdrawal syndrome.

Basically, even after we detox, our brains still have a lot of adjusting to do. They say it takes over a year for our brains natural opioids to fully come out of hiding. And then if we use opiates again even once after detox, they go back into hiding for at least another couple of months! This is why using once often leads to full relapse, as you basically reset your PAWS at least for a few weeks.

Keep at it! The depression does get better. Exercise is a must It's a real PAWS killer, and speeds up your recovery. If the depression is making it really difficult to function, to work, to get out of bed, then I'd suggest getting help from a psychologist or a psychiatrist. Personally I'd try to use a psychologist first, as I think it's healthy for recovering addicts to try to grow outta the pill-solution mentality. But sometimes we just need anti-depressants, fact! If you are thinking of harming yourself or others, I'd suggest you get help now, and go straight for the big-guns.

I will almost guarantee that the depression will improve in coming months with treatment or otherwise, as long as you do your best to get out there and enjoy the things you didn't on drugs. Go to the movies, go rock climbing, go for a country drive, get laid, go to the beach, even if your depression tells you you don't want to. There's so much to do in life, and so little time, especially for us who've lost a few years!


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2011 11:31 pm 
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Ditto Juan. God I hope you're doing ok.

And Substation, how are YOU doing?

I had a family reunion over the weekend and I gotta say, it was trying. Really tested my patience and my ability to function as a non-addicted adult for the first time in a decade. I'll admit, I did NOT like it one bit. I made it through just fine of course, but it was really the first time since I've been clean that I really wanted to either get high, slap the shit outta someone, or use duct tape in a most inappropriate manner.

Oy Vey

-RSJ


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 Post subject: Re: Depression
PostPosted: Mon Oct 24, 2011 7:58 pm 
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Hi, everyone! I'm so sorry I haven't been posting like I should. I hate to state the obvious here, but it's my depression that has kept me away. I sure do appreciate everything you guys have taken the time to write and genuinely feel your concerns for me. It's very comforting and reassuring and I should post more often.

Today is day number 36 free of Suboxone. For some background information, I do see a psychiatrist every two weeks who doubles as a psychologist. So, essentially, by going to him you cut out the two-step process of seeing both a psychiatrist and a psychologist who relay bits of information back to each other in order to come up with the right prescription(s) to take. I have been seeing this doctor for years now and am truly, TRULY lucky to be one of his patients. I have ADHD, and he happens to be an ADHD specialist with a huge knowledge of addiction and how to treat it. I just really lucked up with him. When it turns out that I am low on money, he tells me to pay him what I can afford, but he still spends a little over an hour with me every two weeks and listens deeply to everything I'm going through. I also e-mail him regularly with any questions about my Suboxone withdrawal or about withdrawal in general. He is available to me almost 24/7 and sincerely takes an interest in my well-being.

I have suffered since I was 19 with clinical depression and even longer with clinical insomnia and am being treated for both by my psychiatrist. Currently I take Paxil, Wellbutrin, and Abilify for depression, so that should dispel any of the curiosity anyone had about whether or not I needed to see a professional. Clearly, I do/am.

Last week, generally, was a good week. The nuances of my personality were starting to shine through...and then this past Friday hit, and all of that flew out the window. I went with a group of friends out to dinner and they all noticed my extremely unusual behavior as I was fighting back unwarranted tears the entire time. Once the dinner was over, I got in my car and just let it all out. When I drive is when I find that I do most of my crying, which really isn't very often (except for in the past month or so), so getting in the car was like running to someone with open arms and a shoulder to cry on. I can listen to music and let it all out no matter how loud or horrible sounding it is.

Saturday I spent in a daze. Everything was foggy: my decisions, my actions, my movements. I simply didn't want to make any decisions, to be frank. I was empty from the night before.

Sunday I did something unusual for me: I went hiking with my two dogs. It wasn't a chore at all. My partner pushed me to do it, but my spirits were leveled and I wasn't fatigued or "thinking too much." I had plenty of energy for the hike and am really glad I did it.

Today is Monday and I feel drained again, totally uninspired at work, and am just a waste of a human being. That's the thing with this: YOU JUST DON'T KNOW WHAT EACH DAY WILL BRING. But the worst is over, I know, and now it's a matter of training my mind to live without Suboxone. I read in a previous post that it can take a fucking year for my body's natural opiates to begin producing themselves at full capacity again. When I read things like that (albeit perhaps true) it just sinks me. I agree with the poster who said that us addicts have a quick-fix-in-a-pill mentality about our problems, and to read that it might take a year before I am whole again is shattering. But I have heard it before in rehab about alcohol, so I wouldn't be surprised if it's true. I must say, however, that I have asked my doctor many times how long he anticipates this PAWS-related depression to last, and he has remained steadfast in his resolve that it will be one to two months, so that's what I'm relying on.

Don't get me wrong: I'm not suffering horribly. I have no physical pains or withdrawal-related symptoms aside from daily headaches and diarrhea. It's my mental state that concerns me. As unmotivated to go the extra mile as I was before making the jump, it's nothing compared to my lack of drive now. I get up in the morning and I really don't know what the day is presenting itself to me for. I feel trapped by time, by the days, which go by so slowly sometimes. I get up out of bed and haven't the drive even to feed the dogs, even though I do. And it just scares me. I want my energy back most of all. I'm good at faking like I'm fine most of the time, but when I'm alone, I do nothing, I say nothing, and I think about nothing other than the time. Exercising, which I've done every day, hasn't helped AT ALL.

This was a rather somber post, and I don't want to alarm anyone: I have no intentions of hurting myself AT ALL. I'm still committed to doing this, and I knew that one way or another it wouldn't be easy, but it sure beats depending on that little orange strip under my tongue each morning and afternoon. It is something I know I can look back on and be proud that I did. There is a lyric in a Stevie Nicks song that says, "There is no beauty without my beast," and right now--and JUST for right now--Suboxone is my beast.


--Juan


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 25, 2011 8:20 pm 
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WOW man I’m sooo happy you’re doing OK. I know you aren’t claiming to be on the top of the world right now but all things considered you’re still rockin!

I know exactly what you mean about the depression. I’m day 44 today and still feel depressed some days, and it does vary day by day. Sometimes I’m not sure if I’m still in wd, paws, living life without opiates, ect

I heard the whole ‘it takes a full year’ thing. I personally don’t buy into it, but if you do try and keep an optimistic view. I mean it’s not like you have to wait a full year and then you wake up one day and your perfect. No, it’s a gradual thing. If you’re going with that theory then you’re over 1/12th the way there which is awesome.

I think you’re doing a kick ass job! What you’re doing is not an easy task by any stretch of the imagination.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2011 6:49 pm 
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Hey Everyone,

I'm on day 10 off subs, still feel horrible. Was on 8 mg a day for a little over a year. Jumped at about 4 mg. This is about my 4th time getting off this shit. Last time I was back to normal at about day 8. Now I'm on day 10 almost 11 and still feel horrible. I read on here where people say it takes a month to start feeling normal but I think that is bull shit. I know a lot of this is in your head. I'm over all a pretty positive person but this crap has just been killin me. I'm wondering if anyone knows why its taking longer this time off subs. Does it just get harder each time you do it again? I need some encouragement here, I went back to work and still feeling horrible. This has to be almost over right????


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2011 8:30 pm 
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Finally,

Depending on your dosage and what you jumped from, a month can actually be generous. I’m day 46 sub free and I still have some issues. Although they are minor (stomach issues, lack of energy) they certainly aren’t in my head. It’s strange that you find this time harder than the others. This is my second time quitting suboxone and the first time I quit I felt was actually worst. So I’m in a similar boat as you in that I’m still trying to figure out why this time was better.

I just don’t think there is any easy answer. It could be any number of factors, for me at least. What your stress level is like, what other types of medication are you taking, are you eating healthy, are you drinking a lot of water, do you where red shirts.

The only thing I can say for sure is that it will get better. Around day 12 was when I started feeling better little by little. I think you’re almost done the worst part. I would just hang in there and pass the time. I know that’s easier said than done but you’re so dam close.


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 Post subject: Re: Depression
PostPosted: Fri Oct 28, 2011 12:08 pm 
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jcb1981 wrote:
Hi, everyone! I'm so sorry I haven't been posting like I should. I hate to state the obvious here, but it's my depression that has kept me away. I sure do appreciate everything you guys have taken the time to write and genuinely feel your concerns for me. It's very comforting and reassuring and I should post more often.

Today is day number 36 free of Suboxone. For some background information, I do see a psychiatrist every two weeks who doubles as a psychologist. So, essentially, by going to him you cut out the two-step process of seeing both a psychiatrist and a psychologist who relay bits of information back to each other in order to come up with the right prescription(s) to take. I have been seeing this doctor for years now and am truly, TRULY lucky to be one of his patients. I have ADHD, and he happens to be an ADHD specialist with a huge knowledge of addiction and how to treat it. I just really lucked up with him. When it turns out that I am low on money, he tells me to pay him what I can afford, but he still spends a little over an hour with me every two weeks and listens deeply to everything I'm going through. I also e-mail him regularly with any questions about my Suboxone withdrawal or about withdrawal in general. He is available to me almost 24/7 and sincerely takes an interest in my well-being.

I have suffered since I was 19 with clinical depression and even longer with clinical insomnia and am being treated for both by my psychiatrist. Currently I take Paxil, Wellbutrin, and Abilify for depression, so that should dispel any of the curiosity anyone had about whether or not I needed to see a professional. Clearly, I do/am.

Last week, generally, was a good week. The nuances of my personality were starting to shine through...and then this past Friday hit, and all of that flew out the window. I went with a group of friends out to dinner and they all noticed my extremely unusual behavior as I was fighting back unwarranted tears the entire time. Once the dinner was over, I got in my car and just let it all out. When I drive is when I find that I do most of my crying, which really isn't very often (except for in the past month or so), so getting in the car was like running to someone with open arms and a shoulder to cry on. I can listen to music and let it all out no matter how loud or horrible sounding it is.

Saturday I spent in a daze. Everything was foggy: my decisions, my actions, my movements. I simply didn't want to make any decisions, to be frank. I was empty from the night before.

Sunday I did something unusual for me: I went hiking with my two dogs. It wasn't a chore at all. My partner pushed me to do it, but my spirits were leveled and I wasn't fatigued or "thinking too much." I had plenty of energy for the hike and am really glad I did it.

Today is Monday and I feel drained again, totally uninspired at work, and am just a waste of a human being. That's the thing with this: YOU JUST DON'T KNOW WHAT EACH DAY WILL BRING. But the worst is over, I know, and now it's a matter of training my mind to live without Suboxone. I read in a previous post that it can take a fucking year for my body's natural opiates to begin producing themselves at full capacity again. When I read things like that (albeit perhaps true) it just sinks me. I agree with the poster who said that us addicts have a quick-fix-in-a-pill mentality about our problems, and to read that it might take a year before I am whole again is shattering. But I have heard it before in rehab about alcohol, so I wouldn't be surprised if it's true. I must say, however, that I have asked my doctor many times how long he anticipates this PAWS-related depression to last, and he has remained steadfast in his resolve that it will be one to two months, so that's what I'm relying on.

Don't get me wrong: I'm not suffering horribly. I have no physical pains or withdrawal-related symptoms aside from daily headaches and diarrhea. It's my mental state that concerns me. As unmotivated to go the extra mile as I was before making the jump, it's nothing compared to my lack of drive now. I get up in the morning and I really don't know what the day is presenting itself to me for. I feel trapped by time, by the days, which go by so slowly sometimes. I get up out of bed and haven't the drive even to feed the dogs, even though I do. And it just scares me. I want my energy back most of all. I'm good at faking like I'm fine most of the time, but when I'm alone, I do nothing, I say nothing, and I think about nothing other than the time. Exercising, which I've done every day, hasn't helped AT ALL.

This was a rather somber post, and I don't want to alarm anyone: I have no intentions of hurting myself AT ALL. I'm still committed to doing this, and I knew that one way or another it wouldn't be easy, but it sure beats depending on that little orange strip under my tongue each morning and afternoon. It is something I know I can look back on and be proud that I did. There is a lyric in a Stevie Nicks song that says, "There is no beauty without my beast," and right now--and JUST for right now--Suboxone is my beast.


--Juan


Wow, that really resonated with me. I've had many of the same struggles as you. I've struggled with depression on and off, ADHD that did not go away when I became an adult, and insomnia. I'm not taking meds right now, only because I'm so leery of what to take, but I may try an antidepressant for a little while.

Bottom line: this is where it comes down to one day at a time. I've found getting off Sub to be a very emotional and difficult experience. I was kinda zoned out during my years on Sub. In fact, much of it I simply don't remember. Now, it's like, "Who am I? What do I want? What do I like? What do I want to fill my time with? What is my friggin' purpose!" All this stuff is totally overwhelming and it's all coming at me since I got low on and stopped Sub. One day at a time, man. We have to figure out how to fill our days up with stuff we will be proud of. I don't believe any pill will fix my battles with this. I think it's gonna take a lot of fight and hard work to get used to this new way of feeling. I think it will gradually get better and feel more normal for us, but it's going to take a little while, so we have to only focus on the day at hand. I am very good at faking it to. I think that's a survival skill we learn early on.

((HUGS))

laddertipper

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Hi Juan, glad to see you back. I think it is very true that those of us who already suffer from clinical depression or another mental illness are triggered into an episode when going through withdrawal. Please don't torment yourself by thinking that it's going to take a year for your system to get back to normal. Try to just treat it as a current bout of depression that may begin to improve (or IS improving) as the days pass. It sounds like you are taking every positive step: seeing a psychiatrist/psychologist, getting out with friends or your partner, hiking with your dogs, working. Being able to do these things, even if you are fighting back tears, is a really positive sign in my opinion. Also, give yourself a break. You are doing the things that HAVE to be done, like working and taking care of the dogs. If you don't have the energy to do much else, then so be it, just for today.
Many, many years ago a sponsor told me that how you are FEELING is not the same as how you are DOING. You are doing really well, and I truly hope that an improvement in your feelings are not far behind.
This shit is not easy, but you sound like a warrior - so just keep moving forward.
(((hugs)))
Lilly


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 28, 2011 6:46 pm 
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Joined: Thu Oct 27, 2011 6:40 pm
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substation,

I appreciate the feedback. Today is day 11. I feel a little better I guess. I do not want to get back on this crap again. I feel like if I do it one more time I might as well just stay on it for life. Very tempted today to go back to the doctor tho bc its friday and I don't wanna feel like s### all weekend. Tomorrow will be day 12 so I'm hoping I will feel better then. Pretty much I guess I need to just man up and get over it. I need to have my life back, I'm tired of being on this shit it just numbs you. I do have a lot of stress at work and home so maybe that is some of the issue. I dont take any other prescription drugs, have been taking a lot of vitamins and supplements in hope that it will make me feel better, hasn't helped too much.

Thank you tho, I appreciate it. I need to man up and get thru this Monday will be 2 weeks so I HAVE to start feeling better by then.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 28, 2011 11:11 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 10, 2011 10:04 pm
Posts: 421
Location: California, San Diego
Dear Finallyoff & jcb1981,
I really believe that you ARE where you really want to be." OFF SUBOXONE". Right. Wouldnt it be really wonderful to be kind to yourself, right now, for this one thing alone? You are doing IT! You are OFF suboxone. So many people wish they could be where you are. BE THANKFUL to yourself. Give yourself a pat on the back. YOU KNOW that this feeling will not last forever. It is impossible. One day at a time. I know you are thru the worst of it. It can only get better from here on out. If you have read any of the other threads about jumping off sub, day 10 is usually as bad as it gets. Try to find the positive in your situation. Same with you jcb1981, give yourself a break and let yourself be happy, be free, enjoy your life. We will never know happiness any other way if we dont allow our joy to shine thru. You guys ARE OFF SUB! It beats being on sub. So be happy.
(sorry if I sound harsh, but I believe in you both)


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2011 10:45 am 
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not every body'. but a friend of mine said the same thing you did . and i hope your really ready to come off suboxone.
you will make it through this, and it takes a lot off time to recover. my friend is back using again and in the worst shape
i have ever seen him in. i.ll tell you' if you ever feel like ,or going to use again. don't do what he's doing?
go back on sub's. keep trucken!


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Fond Du Lac Psychiatry
Dr. Jeffrey Junig, M.D., Ph.D.

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