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PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2012 3:44 pm 
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The following passage is from the book 'The Art of Happiness'. I have re-read this part many times and thought it might be helpful to others. I apologize if it's been posted before. I have taken out some of the analytical text by co-author, but recommend the book very strongly.

"Now sometimes people confuse happiness with pleasure. True happiness relates more to the mind and heart. Happiness that depends on physical pleasure is unstable; one day it is there, the next it may not be.

Everyday we are faced with numerous decisions and choices. And try as we may, we often don't choose the the thing we know is 'good for us'. Part of this is related to the fact that the 'right choice' is often the difficult one - the one that involves some sacrifice of our pleasure.

None of us need help to understand pleasure. We know when we feel it. We know it in touch or smile of loved one, the luxury of hot bath on cold afternoon. in the beauty of a sunset. But many of us also know the pleasure in frenetic rhapsody of cocaine rush, heroin high, the revelry of alcohol buzz, unrestrained sexual excess, the exhilaration of winning streak in vegas. These are also very real pleasures - pleasures many in our society must come to terms with.

Although there are no easy solutions to avoiding these destructive pleasures, fortunately we have a place to begin: the simple reminder that what we are seeking in life is happiness. If we approach our choices in life keeping this in mind, it is easier to give up the things that are ultimately harmful to us, even if those things bring us momentary pleasure.

The reason is its usually difficult to "Just say No" is found in the word no; that approach is associated with a sense of rejecting something, of giving something up, of denying ourselves.

But there is a better approach: framing the question we face by asking ourselves "Will it bring us happiness?" That simple question can be powerful tool in helping us skillfully conduct all areas of our lives. It puts a new slant on things. Approaching our daily decisions and choices with this question in mind shifts the focus from what we are denying ourselves to what we are seeking - ultimate happiness. A kind of happiness that is stable and persistent.

With this perspective, its easier to make the "right choice" because we are acting to give ourselves something, not denying or withholding something from ourselves - an attitude of moving toward rather than moving away; an attitude of embracing life rather than rejecting it. This underlying sense of moving toward happiness can have a very profound effect; it makes us more receptive, more open, to the joy of living life'

- The Art of Happiness (Dalai Lama)

I think the correlation to many of our situations is rather clear. I personally believe the point of life is happiness and to many of us, Suboxone is standing in the way of true happiness. As hard as tapering, jumping, and going through WD's might be, remember we are giving ourselves something by doing so and moving towards happiness, not denying the momentary pleasure subs might provide, could be helpful.

Good luck to everyone


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2012 5:42 pm 
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thank you for that post. it has just been recent that i realized that everytime i screwed up my life i realize it was for pleasure. my new aim in life is to do the right thing, even if it means denying pleasure. thanks again!


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2012 11:40 pm 
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WOW.........

this is a REALLY great post..........It not only 'fits' the suboxone therapy, but SO many decisions we make on a daily basis!!!!!!!!

who wrote the book??

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2012 12:59 am 
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The book is called 'The Art of Happiness" and based on many of the ideas and teachings of the dalai lama. However it is coauthored by a Dr Cutler and basically written by Dr Cutler from a serious of interviews he had with the dalai lama over a series of years. There is some context from the author but also a lot of direct passages / quotes taken directly from the dalai lama himself (such as the one above). Not religious at all.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2012 6:20 am 
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lifeasbefore wrote:
I think the correlation to many of our situations is rather clear. I personally believe the point of life is happiness and to many of us, Suboxone is standing in the way of true happiness. As hard as tapering, jumping, and going through WD's might be, remember we are giving ourselves something by doing so and moving towards happiness, not denying the momentary pleasure subs might provide, could be helpful.


I couldn't disagree with you more! Suboxone does not stand in the way of true happiness. That's the biggest bunch of hooey I've heard in a some time. You think in order to be happy we need to withhold something pleasurable from ourselves? AND you think suboxone is that thing that's giving us some kind of pleasure? I'm not sure what you mean by that, because I feel nothing when I take my suboxone. That's how it was designed to be - no high once tolerant to the medication. Suboxone is not a drug of choice, it's a treatment for opiate addiction.

You're talking about suboxone the way a person would talk about someone's active addiction or drug of choice. Perhaps you don't understand how suboxone works...that it's a partial opiate agonist as compared to "regular" pain pills that are full agonists?

Lastly, did you come here for addiction recovery or just to tell us all that we have to give up suboxone in order to be happy?

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2012 7:21 am 
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Hello,
This is the first time that I am responding to someone's post, because I am a newcomer and have a lot to learn. By the way, this website is a wonderful tool in my learning process!!! Thank you.

I am going to have to respectfully disagree when you say that "suboxone is standing in the way" of my happiness. It's quite the contrary, actually. Suboxone has allowed me to become a better person. It has allowed me to be a better mother. It has allowed me to help my family, to become dependable again, to be reliable, and to follow through on promises I make. Both to myself, and to others. It does not do this by providing me with a euphoric high that is providing me temporary pleasure. My opiates did just that. Suboxone has been the key to my opiate handcuffs.

I don't know you at all, and I do not know your story. Have you ever been addicted to pain pills? Or any opiate? Heroine? I'm just curious, because it sounds as though you were trying to draw the reader in with this wonderful hope of how to attain happiness in their life, only to slap them in the face by telling them that their choice of therapy, is robbing them of true happiness. I personally do not discriminate against anyone who chooses methadone, 12 steps, SMART recovery, or any other form of recovery for their maintenance plan. I, in turn, expect to be given the same courtesy for choosing suboxone as mine.

I belonged to another support forum in the past. This post reminds me of the new people that would come along once in a while and just cause an uproar for no other reason than to satisfy their own ego. I am not accusing you of this being your intention. I just don't see how telling people, who have chosen suboxone, that they basically cannot be happy until they rid themselves of this drug. It's just false information, and stems from a lack of education on how the drug works. I waited two years longer than I should have because of people like you. People who ran around to miscellaneous forums and posted "hatethreads" on them about suboxone. I truly hope that no addict who is considering suboxone is fooled by these posts like I was for two years.

If you are a recovering addict and you chose some other form of therapy such as 12 steps, or methadone, and would like to share how that has enriched your life, I would love to read it! However, I ask that you give suboxone users the same respect.

Have a great day all!
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2012 8:14 am 
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I agree with what's been said...about suboxone "standing in the way...."

I guess it depends on if you look at the word "happiness" as a verb, or a noun.

To me, happiness is something that is achieved...through whatever means necessary for each individual...not something you suddenly wake up one day and say "oh..I found you, happiness..now life is better."

Happiness is an emotion, and each person will have a different view of what happiness is in THEIR own life..there's no set structure or basis/rules to get to being happy...there's no pre-set pathway to follow or certain steps you must take/ not take in order to "be happy"...

I think the word happiness from an active addict, and the word happiness from a person who isn't in active addiction, mean VERY different things. What made me happy when I was seeking was finding a stash of pills...or having plenty of money to buy pills...but that was short-lived and only lasted until 1)ran out of money, or 2)ran out of pills. True happiness to an active addict is something they bury within themselves by self-medicating...for whatever the reason.

So no, there's nothing standing in the way of happiness except one's self and how much determination there is to find that happiness.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2012 12:26 pm 
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I've never been happier at any other time in my life than I have been since starting Suboxone therapy. :D


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2012 12:29 pm 
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Im sorry if I offended anyone with the "suboxone standing in the way of happiness" line. It was not meant to be taken like that. I myself have been on suboxone for 3 years and it honestly has been a godsend. Who knows where I would be. That being said, and admitting to being fairly new to this site, I posted this under the "Getting Off Suboxone" thread and it was meant as encouragement to other people trying to get off as well. From all the people I have talked to / threads I read under In the Rear View Mirror, the vast majority are glad that they are off suboxone and feel like themselves again.

I am happier than I was 3 years ago, but know I will be truly happier when I am completely off, but maybe that is just me.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2012 12:35 pm 
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Thanks for clearing that up!! I apologize for reading it wrong.... but it is worded kinda heavy in that last paragraph. Congratulations to you lifeasbefore on your years of sobriety!!! It always encourages me to hear that people are doing so well on it as a long term maintenance. That is also my plan. I won't come off of it until I am good and ready to. And if this ends up being something that I take for the rest of my life, I am open to that as well! Good luck in your continued sobriety, and when you are ready to come off of suboxone, I wish you all the best!!!

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2012 12:38 pm 
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maybe i didnt make this clear. I AM ON SUBOXONE and have been for three years. I wasnt coming to hate on people and telll people how bad suboxone is. As i said, it has been a life saver. But the thread I posted under wasnt "general discussion" but the "Getting Off Suboxone" so figured, quite understandably I think, that the people reading those posts are hoping tp get off.
All I wanted to say to those tapering, jumping, etc....keep going.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2012 12:44 pm 
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lifeasbefore - I did think that you had good intentions with your original post, but it's just that last paragraph, as Goinstrong suggested, that maybe hit a little nerve with people. I know for myself, that Suboxone is absolutely not standing in the way of my true happiness. It is actually the exact opposite, since it is the one thing that I have done in the last two decades that has allowed me to experience my life as a happy person...instead of miserable, negative, hopeless, and addicted.

Just curious...why are you trying to taper off of subs? Is taking Suboxone standing in the way of something in your life? Whatever the case may be, I wish you luck in whatever choices you make. This is a good place to find advice and support!


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2012 12:56 pm 
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I can see how my last paragraph might have rubbed people the wrong way. I should have just left it to the passage.

In response to your question as why I want off, its the side effects. Most notably suboxone has killed my sex drive to extent of non-existence and as a 29 year male, its something ive missed for 3 years (plus I want a family eventually and would never care to get a wife at my state), and the apathy / lethargy it causes. I have a JD from a great law school that could open a lot of doors, and I havent dont anything with it in three years. Maybe its part depression, but I never experienced depression before and my doc said there is no way to know if i have depression until I am off. Side effects are main reason. PLus the idea of not being dependent on something seems nice to me


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2012 1:18 pm 
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I too have noticed the effect it has had on my sex drive. I guess as of right now, I am not worried about it as I have a 16 month old and as am raising him alone. So, I am not really looking for a relationship or anything right now. Later, more than likely I will. So, I can definately see why you would want to taper off of this. It will definately bother me later. Plus, if it's holding you back from moving forward with your career, I would encouage you to follow your dreams and get off the suboxone. That is a terrific achievement, and to let it waste would be silly! Kudos to you for seeing that and wanting to change it! As far as the fact that you are dependent on something, I agree. I am 100% dependent on my suboxne at this point. Like I said in an earlier post, maybe one day I'll be ready to come off, but for now no. I think it's a courageous and noble thing to want to live your life free of being dependent on suboxone! Best of luck to you!

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