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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 1:52 pm 
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Hi everybody,

So I was looking for some advice.

I am going to be getting insurance soon, and I was thinking, if I use my insurance to help cover my treatment expenses, can my employer find out, will they find out, that I am in addiction treatment?

Also, is there a way to find out if my insurer will even cover Suboxone and doctor visits? I looked at the paper work at the exclusions and addiction medicine is NOT listed as an exclusion, but is there a way to find out for sure if my doctor visits and medication is covered?

Thanks!


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 2:39 pm 
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Hello again, Maleko 8)
well, I dont think there's any way to know, until you actually go, and try, to see if your appointments and/or suboxone
will be paid for.
but the GOOD news is, even if its NOT covered, there's SOME kind of "cap" on your outta pocket expenses
for each year, or should be. . . .
shouldn't be TOO much work to figure out what THAT is.
I'd just save EVERYTHING that proves a paper-trail to the money,,,,,, you've spent.
BUT,
lets think POSITIVE and say, you MAY just get the coverage!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
If not, there IS a patient assistance program thru RB, I was on it for a year, and it REALLY HELPED me get on my feet.....
At least it allowed me to have that 4-500 HUNDRED dollars a month, for a whole year, to HELP me get on top of my financial
situation.
ANYWAYS,,,,
I hope the best ON THAT front.......

now I dont think its LEGAL, at ALL, for your employer to know ANYTHING about your medical history!!!!
Im no lawyer, or attorney, but that just SCREAMS illegal, to ME.
when I had my dentures done, I had to have papers signed at the dentist's office AND the doctor's office, both having to
be notarized, JUST so the dentist and doctor could communicate about my treatment plan,,,,,
sedation stuff, ETC ETC ETC

Im not sure if you can look that up some where for your state,,, but you SHOULD be able to.........
and im not sure WHO they would ask (your employer) anyways???


WELL, I sure hope this helps a bit.
and I do soooooooo HOPE to HELL, your appointments ARE covered, as well as your perscriptions.
OH,
ya know, i've heard of doctors putting on the form to the insurance that suboxone is perscribed FIRST for PAIN,,,,
and secondly as abstinance. (spelling?)
SO, you could try it that way, to be on the safe side.............

GLAD I thought of THAT!!!!!

okay,,,, wish you the BEST of LUCK going forward,,,,,,,,,
have a great weekend!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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anyone can give up,
its the easiest thing in the world to do, but to
hold it together, when everyone would understand if you fell apart
That's TRUE STRENGTH
http://almostoneyearclean.blogspot.com/


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 Post subject: Your fine
PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 11:44 pm 
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HIPPA protects that info. They will not know about meds or doc visits unless you tell them. I had the same fear and looked into it


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 01, 2013 12:49 am 
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Tndb wrote:
HIPPA protects that info. They will not know about meds or doc visits unless you tell them. I had the same fear and looked into it


You're likely correct. But HIPAA is something VERY few people actually understand and, since it's a bell you can't unrung and the consequences are so dramatic, HIPAA is something, each person understanding EXACTLY where he stands before making blanket presumptions is HUGELY important.

Most people presume HIPAA means healthcare providers can't disclose any personally identifiable healthcare information except under subpoena or other certain exigent legal circumstances and their personal healthcare information is therefore may as well be stored in the Cone of Silence.

BALDERDASH.

HIPAA merely requires "covered entities" to obtain your consent before disclosing any of your healthcare information, which most do on a regular basis every day. Most people sign away the majority of their privacy assurances as a condition of participating in insurance coverage, obtaining medical treatment or filling a prescription. Once you've signed, they're free to disclose under the terms of the waiver at their discretion.

You're free to revoke it, and they're free to no longer provide healthcare-related services to you.

If HIPAA was all about assurances guaranteeing your privacy as a patient, why the hell are patients the ones signing all the HIPAA forms (which most patients never bother to read)? They may claim to require a signature to acknowledge they've informed you of your rights, but within that disclosure is almost invariably some kind of waiver that undoes MOST of the privacy most people presume they have which, in all fairness, is often necessary for many providers to engage in the business of providing healthcare.

Think about it. If what most people assume were true, it'd be healthcare providers who'd be doing all the signing of all the statements to establish that they understand HIPAA and are promising to keep your health information private.

Even as people seek reimbursement through Flexible Spending account administrators to be reimbursed with their own money, here's a little sample of one waiver one of the largest firms requires with each claim people submit:

Quote:
I hereby authorize XXXXX or its representatives to obtain necessary information from all physicians, hospitals, medical service providers, pharmacists, employers, and all other agencies or organizations (this includes other insurers) to consider the claim for reimbursement under my Healthcare Account.


Now, whether or not they actually consult your employer, they're at perfect liberty to disclose as they see fit. Historically, many businesses would have ethical barriers to the types of information they'd seek, but all bets are off today when cost control is king.

Another misperception is that Obamacare fixes all. In addition to everything it starts out by breaking, all it does is require some kind of health insurance be available. It doesn't do a damned thing to ensure continued employment is available and, despite many people's presumption that everybody will now have all the jobs and health insurance they ever wanted, they're more likely to find employers finding even more blatant and creative ways to become even more aggressive in the types of employment risk they're willing to take on.

It may very well be most people can obtain insurance reimbursement for their Sub treatment without negatively impacting their employment status. But one person making any sort of presumption of his own situation based upon anybody else's would be the biggest mistake of all.

Best of luck.


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 Post subject: Read the Dates
PostPosted: Mon Apr 01, 2013 1:17 am 
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Hi Platack, and welcome to the forum. In the future please try to look at the posting date of the one you want to respond to. This thread is a little bit over 4 months back so you probably won't be posting to the person you intended to.

Why don't you start your own thread in the Introduction section so we can get to know who you are.

Rule

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:51 pm 
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Sorry Rule, I'm replying... not to the OP but in case someone is reading this who is interested. :)

platack wrote:
HIPAA merely requires "covered entities" to obtain your consent before disclosing any of your healthcare information, which most do on a regular basis every day. Most people sign away the majority of their privacy assurances as a condition of participating in insurance coverage, obtaining medical treatment or filling a prescription. Once you've signed, they're free to disclose under the terms of the waiver at their discretion.


This is true. We sign away most of our rights when we apply for anything these days. In addition to what is quoted above, when you apply for a new insurance plan down the road, you also give permission for the new insurance to obtain all of your old medical history.

Also, as someone who is currently working in the finance department of a corporation, I can tell you that it's not unusual to receive company employee medical bills. I don't know if this is unusual or not or done on purpose?


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