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 Post subject: Re: blue (R.I.P)
PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2012 5:15 pm 
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Katherine wrote:
Hi everybody,
While going through my sons address book, I found info that he was a member of this forum last year. I thought I'd sign in to tell you that Kevin "blue" died earlier this year from an overdose of percocet/valium/vicodin. He was 38 yrs old. He was on Suboxone for 4-5 months last year. He quit the program because it became a "burden" and expensive. We later found out that Suboxone just wasn't killing the physical and emotional pain he was trying to escape from.
This is very personal to me, but maybe I can save someone's life on here by telling you this story. Don't give up, and don't leave the program early for losing faith. While Kevin was very open with not caring whether he lived or died, I bet he would change his mind if he knew how many wonderful more years he could've had, and how many friends and family he left behind that are heartbroken.
Good luck & God bless.
Katherine


Oh Man,,Im so sorry to hear about your son,,and too damn young to lose!!,,I often wonder about people i meet on these forums then dont hear from them again,,it always worries me,,and i tend to take to heart what i get from other members of whatever forum im on.,,I wish i had known him.
I can relate in a way,,i know theres nothin worse than losin a child ,,but i lost my wife of 20 yrs and she was only 55yrs old...It was sad cause we had just lost our home to a tornado,,then wer decided we were gonna get our shit together and live our5 lives sober till the teenage girls moved out ,,then it was gonna be our time,,i went to detox first to get off xanax,,then she was going in,,I guess she wanted to get her last hurrah in before she went,,and died while i was in detox.,,we never remembered our anniversary but she died on it so i'll never forget.
And what you say about not quiting is probably the best advise for most of us,,sub is the only thing that has stopped me,,10 yrs in prison didnt,,30 days in a coma where i actually did die for a minute,,and they were gonna pull the plug but did one more test first and found some brain function,,but 2 months later i was in ER for overdose,, it was then, in 04 they put me on sub,,my doctor told me to seek this med before food and shelter cause he knew i wouldnt last much longer.
anyway,,i just seen this and wanted to say im sorry for your lose and i apreciate you postin what you did.
I also wanted to say i understand your anger at the cost of this drug,,and there are so many cashing in on it,,I had one doctor,,im on medicaiid and disabled after the coma,,my kidneys shut down and infection in lungs spread all over,,but getting back to this doctor,,my regular doctor retired annd he refeered me to this doctor,,i was his very first paitient,,he would talk to me like i was a doctor about other people and it was wierd,,then they office workers didnt do the paperwork right and one day i go to my appt. and he walks in,,and throws a script on the table and says dont come here for free meds anymore,,if you can pay your connections you can pay me,,I didnt have the slightest idea what he was talkin about!
Tattoo Tommy

I also wanted to add that kevins story just might save a life,,and i hope thats true!


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2012 4:09 am 
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I'm sorry for your sons death and your loss. Addiction wastes so many good, valuable lives.

I'm so sorry.


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 Post subject: Re: blue (R.I.P)
PostPosted: Mon Aug 12, 2013 3:05 pm 
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I'm so deeply sorry for your loss. Thinking of you all xxx

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Don't one day, SAY TODAY!
There is always a solution to the problem


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2013 7:41 pm 
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This is very well said & by a Dr at that!! I'm glad but it does give me hope that there are still a few good Dr's left!! It's so sad what is happening!! The greedy Dr's are putting the good Dr's out of business bcus they want all the patients & money. We have a Dr in our area with well over 500 patients, & never gets in trouble, he was drunk driving & killed someone & never even saw a day in court, killed an elderly woman when he had a pediatric office bcus he was also trying to specialize in geriatric care & the woman died right in his pediatric office & all this has been brushed under the rug. But come to find out he used to be on the Medical board & knows people. How is this fair for the patients??? To be forced to come to him, I don't think so!!! I would rather drive 2 hours once a month than go to him. It's $575 for the 1st visit then $150 every month plus if u have insurance he bills that too! I thought that was illegal but apparently it isn't for him!

hatmaker510 wrote:
Okla - I'm pasting the following below from Dr. Junig's blog. Instead of me speculating on the ridiculous reasons for the patient cap, I'd rather Dr. Junig do it the very unique way he has.

Quote:
The Cap
by SuboxDoc on July 17, 2011

Each physician who prescribes buprenorphine for opioid dependence can treat only 30 patients at a time during the first year as a certified prescriber. After a year, physicians can apply to have the limit increased to 100 patients. I have been at the 100-patient limit for some time, in part because of the shortage of providers willing to undergo training and go through the paperwork to get certified.

At the same time, there are no limits at all on the number of patients who can be treated by doctors with high-potency opioids, and no limits or regulations on the types of conditions that can be treated using narcotics. It is no surprise that I receive several calls per day from people who ask for help, who I am forced to turn away.

The 100-patient cap, combined with the shortage of doctors, results in one of the few areas of true health care rationing, and it is only appropriate that the rationing hit drug addicts– those viewed as society’s least deserving. I realize that some people see ‘inability to pay’ as a form of rationing, and I understand the point. But inability to pay has at least a theoretical solution—if not an actual solution if enough hoops are jumped through. For opioid dependence, the patient cap is an absolute restriction, with no grievance or appeal process for those left out.

I feel for the patients who call asking for help, and for the parents who sometimes call in place of the child-addict. If I am the first person called, the callers are surprised and angry at being turned away. Here they finally got up the nerve to ask for help, and the person on the end of the line won’t DO anything?! More often, though, my name was found halfway down a long list of telephone numbers from poorly-updated web directories of Suboxone doctors, and disappointment can be heard in the voice of the caller before the entire question is asked: are YOU accepting any new people?

The good part of the cap, I suppose, is that it reduces the opportunity for unscrupulous practices to become ‘Suboxone mills’, turning out addict after addict with easy prescriptions but without adequate education, follow-up, and counseling. I buy into this argument, but at the same time, I wonder why the concern over unscrupulous practices focuses so intensely over those who treat addiction? Should there not be equal concern over the number of patients that a neurosurgeon can care for?

Now that we have urgent care centers in supermarkets, is there no limit to the capacity for the doctor in the meat department to provide adequate care and follow-up for the patients who stop by? Or is it OK if a general practice doctor decides to schedule 20 patients per hour, so that each patient receives a bare minimum of focused care with no time for preventative medicine?

But we think differently about THOSE doctors—those who work in the clean world of treating asthma and ulcers and hemorrhoids—than we do about the docs who work with drug addicts. With the former, there is an assumption that the doctors are good people who will know their own limits and do the right thing—even as any trip to the doctor points out the folly of that assumption. And the latter group of doctors—those who stoop to treating addiction—are assumed to be incapable of determining, by themselves, the appropriate number of patients who can be safely seen in their practices. The expectation of bad practice comes from negative attitudes toward those with addictions, with doctors guilty by association. In short, the medical specialty of addiction treatment suffers the same negative stigma as do the addicts themselves.

Given these attitudes, I do not expect the shortage of buprenorphine prescribers to end anytime soon.


This is from: http://suboxonetalkzone.com/2011/07/17/the-cap/


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 Post subject: Re: blue (R.I.P)
PostPosted: Wed Aug 21, 2013 12:26 pm 
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I am so sorry to hear that Blue died. Thank you so much for posting this. My heart goes out to your family,. This disease is a monster.
I am so grateful for the Suboxone treatment plan. I stopped taking Suboxone one time because it had gotten so expensive plus i had family members shame me for taking it. And I relapsed. Luckily I knew that I needed to get back in the program and have been on it ever since. I know now that if I stop suboxone, I do not have a fighting chance of staying clean.


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 Post subject: Re: blue (R.I.P)
PostPosted: Tue Nov 26, 2013 10:49 am 
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You and your family are in my thoughts and prayers.

God Bless
LovinLifeFinally


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 Post subject: Re: blue (R.I.P)
PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 4:22 am 
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I am so sorry for your loss. Thank you for this post....it is a wake up call and reminder for McGee to keep pushing, even on the days I feel discouraged. God bless and thank you for sharing.


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 Post subject: Re: blue (R.I.P)
PostPosted: Thu Jan 30, 2014 6:00 pm 
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I'm sooo sorry. I didn't know him but that is very sad to hear. A very deadly disease this opiate addiction. :(


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 Post subject: Re: blue (R.I.P)
PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2014 5:56 pm 
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Dear Katherine;
My sympathies to you and your family for the loss of your son. I thank you for the courage to reach out to us who are trying to keep ahead of this evil addiction, and for sharing your story.
I am new to this forum (my first post) and feel fortunate to have found it. I can honestly say that Suboxone has saved my life. I'm fortunate to be in a position where the financial burden of this treatment is not a hindrance to my continued recovery, and I'm horrified to be finding out the hurdles that so many go through for such an effective treatment.
I hope you can keep the fond memories first and foremost, and know that your strength is helping others.
Warm regards,
Kelly


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 Post subject: Re: blue (R.I.P)
PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2014 7:14 pm 
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I wish that I could find a way to take all of the things I've seen over the past 15-20 years since my own opioid dependence first began, until now. Before starting this forum I was the 'expert on addiction' for the web site, medhelp.org. There was also a 'layperson' addiction forum on the same web site. My forum was constantly under attack by the other forum (both were part of medhelp.org), whose members sent nasty messages calling me a 'drug pusher' for supporting buprenorphine treatment. But after 6-12 months, I started getting a different type of email. I started getting messages from people apologizing for things they had written, and asking for my help. They all had the same message: 'I always hated Suboxone because I thought I wasn't really clean. But after a year (or 2, or 5 years) off buprenorphine, I started taking pain pills again, and now it is worse than ever. Do you know a Suboxone doctor in my area?'

Then there are all of the people I treated over the years, who had family members who were constantly battling me over Suboxone.... as I said in today's video message, moms and dads and spouses would come to the office visit with patients, and ask 'when are you going to get them off that stuff?' I would explain why I thought that they were best off ON buprenorphine, and at some point, the patient would give in to those forces and taper off buprenorphine. I've seen six obituaries of former patients, but I'm certain that many more than six have died, since I rarely read the paper, and many of those who die don't publish obituaries with photos (or they use photos from five years earlier, before the person became addicted).

I don't mean to take ANYTHING away from this touching thread-- but rather to continue to do whatever I can to make sure that people understand the situation out there. I hope that everyone reading this has a personal 'safety plan' to deal with opioid dependence; something that triggers automatic action, even if your own mind is off on a tangent....


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 Post subject: Re: blue (R.I.P)
PostPosted: Wed Feb 19, 2014 2:49 pm 
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Hello...i have been clean from heroin for 6 years with subs...here is my facebook page to go tto for support https://www.facebook.com/pages/Beating- ... 4290309568


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 Post subject: Re: blue (R.I.P)
PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2017 11:04 pm 
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Katherine wrote:
Hi everybody,
While going through my sons address book, I found info that he was a member of this forum last year. I thought I'd sign in to tell you that Kevin "blue" died earlier this year from an overdose of percocet/valium/vicodin. He was 38 yrs old. He was on Suboxone for 4-5 months last year. He quit the program because it became a "burden" and expensive. We later found out that Suboxone just wasn't killing the physical and emotional pain he was trying to escape from.
This is very personal to me, but maybe I can save someone's life on here by telling you this story. Don't give up, and don't leave the program early for losing faith. While Kevin was very open with not caring whether he lived or died, I bet he would change his mind if he knew how many wonderful more years he could've had, and how many friends and family he left behind that are heartbroken.
Good luck & God bless.
Katherine


This is truly heart breaking. I picture my own mother looking through my things and trying to alert the people that she has never met of my death. I work every day to have this not become a reality. I've already died twice and by the grace of the universe, I'm still here . I've been saved by Narcan and first responders and I owe my life to them. I can't tell you how easily this could have been my reality, any of our realities while using.
I thank you for reaching out and letting us know. I didn't know your son but he sounds like he was a pretty awesome dude. He sounded kind of tortured by his addiction and although I hate when people say this and hate that I'M saying it, he's in a better place. Maybe he has found some peace.
Best wishes and my deepest sympathy to you and your family.


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 Post subject: Re: blue (R.I.P)
PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 1:17 pm 
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I think this is the one I was talking about. Very sad but thankful his mother let us know. I haven't went bk and read it all yet but the person I was talking about was Blue. I never had any conversations with him unfortunately but we all know how easily it could have been any one of us.

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 Post subject: Re: blue (R.I.P)
PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 10:35 pm 
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That's right, my JennJenn, I remember that post. So sad and yes it could be any of us.

Bless you sweets

Queenie


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