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PostPosted: Fri Jan 31, 2014 2:32 pm 
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Hi everybody, im just curious about what other people are doing as far as treating chronic pain with suboxone. i am so very lucky to have a psychiatrist that put me on suboxone for my severe chronic pain after struggling with pain docs, painful procedures, and tolerance/addiction to pain killers fir the last 18 years. ive only been on the sub for a few days, and im having nausea from hell. ive been cutting my dose in half, and taking it twice a day (4mg twice daily) but still feel sick. today i cut my dose in thirds and will only take it twice (so, about 6 mg total daily). ive heard that MUCH lower doses can treat chronic pain and i was wondering whats been working for those of you that take it for pain reasons. i will be discussing it with my doc as well, just like to get a variety of opinions. so far, this forum has been super informative...im grateful i stumbled upon it online! thanks in advance for all your help.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 31, 2014 5:54 pm 
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Hi Neo,

The majority of our members here are taking suboxone for addiction, so it may be awhile before you get a response. Just be patient and I'm sure someone else in your situation will see this and comment.

As for the nausea, that is a pretty common symptom of someone taking a dose that is higher than their tolerance level. You have two options on how to deal with it. First, you could cut your dose back as you have been doing until you reach the dose that takes care of your pain and also leaves you with little to no nausea. This is what I would personally recommend, suboxone should be taken in the smallest effective dose possible. And dosed multiple times during the day if you are using it for pain control.

The other option would be to just wait it out. The nausea will eventually go away after your body has time to adjust to the higher levels of opiate in your system. In fact, even if you cut the dose back it may take a few days for the nausea to go away. But, it eventually will. Just keep in mind that suboxone is a very strong opiate, if you don't have a history of addiction it may be alot stronger than what you are used to. Just give it some time and it will work itself out.

It may be a good idea to call your doctor and let them know that you are having trouble. He may have some suggestions of things you can do to lessen the nausea.

Good luck!

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 12:46 am 
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I agree and don't have much to add... but whenever I have people start buprenorphine or Suboxone at home, I tell them to take 4 mg and wait an hour... and if they have nausea, to wait 24 hours and take half of what made them nauseated. If they get sick, wait 24 hours and take half of THAT dose. By the third day, if the dose is cut down like that, nausea is pretty uncommon.... and I start tapering back up each day as tolerated. Someone in that situation has a lower opioid tolerance, so I would usually go up to 8 mg per day in divided doses (4 am, 4 pm). The ceiling effect probably prevents much more in the way of pain control with higher doses.. but some people say that higher doses work better. There is such a large psychological component to chronic pain that it is difficult to sort out what happens from increased buprenorphine, vs the effects of knowing you are on a higher dose.

I think that dosing once per day makes sense with addiction, but dosing 2 or even 3 times per day makes sense for pain--- mainly to take advantage of the placebo effect. Even if it is 'placebo', if it works, it works....


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2014 11:22 pm 
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neo felis wrote:
Hi everybody, im just curious about what other people are doing as far as treating chronic pain with suboxone. i am so very lucky to have a psychiatrist that put me on suboxone for my severe chronic pain after struggling with pain docs, painful procedures, and tolerance/addiction to pain killers fir the last 18 years. ive only been on the sub for a few days, and im having nausea from hell. ive been cutting my dose in half, and taking it twice a day (4mg twice daily) but still feel sick. today i cut my dose in thirds and will only take it twice (so, about 6 mg total daily). ive heard that MUCH lower doses can treat chronic pain and i was wondering whats been working for those of you that take it for pain reasons. i will be discussing it with my doc as well, just like to get a variety of opinions. so far, this forum has been super informative...im grateful i stumbled upon it online! thanks in advance for all your help.



I use to take Subxone. It made me nauseous regardless of what dose I was on. My nausea was tolerable. The main issue I had was leg and ankle swelling. I have never had swelling issues except when I was pregnant. My primary doctor and pain management doctor worked with me to see what medicine it could be. They ended up saying I was hypersensitive to the Naxalone. They switched me to Subutex and my swelling went away after 3 days.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 01, 2014 7:30 pm 
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Hi Neo I have been on Suboxone for 6 weeks and currently at 16mg per day. I use Suboxone through my addictions doc to treat my opiate addiction disease Plus a mild spondilolisthesis at L5s1 which before starting Sub gave me muscle spasms in the glutes area Every bloody night in bed for a decade.

I got addicted to the pro drug codeine which for me easily converted to morphine in my liver. But it's a silly drug for pain with a short duration of effect and I found myself needing more and more. I used other prescription opiates such as tramadol but simple codeine was the one I got addicted to, I used these pills every night for about 9 Years, lucky I don't drink much alcohol as my liver would've been shot to pieces.

Anyway, yes for me Suboxone has been a wonder drug in treating pain related to a chronic Spondy condition. My understanding is that Bup when it first went on the market it was first used to treat various pain complaints. A simple test for anyone on Suboxone is to pinch your skin and see what happens...yeah not much feeling. I also think that 2mg and under of sub will be fine to treat most niggling, neuropathic pains.

I follow the subdocs videos and views closely and I plan to stay on Sub long term but I will gradually move down to the lowest manageable dose for me. Good luck.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 4:07 pm 
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Hi Neo. I've been on Suboxone for a little 2 years now. I take 1.5 of the film per day, although there are days when I take less. I was hooked on every painkiller imaginable until I started on Suboxone and haven't wanted or craved an opiate since starting the treatment.

My doctor knows that addiction is a disease that runs in my family, so I am in the group that will most likely be on Suboxone for the rest of their life at a consistent dose.

That being said, in September 2012 (9 months into treatment), I was in a terrible car accident that almost paralyzed me. I ended up walking away with a compacted C5 vertebrae (which is the lowest on the spine). Since that accident, my back has been in constant pain. Knowing that if I were to stop my suboxone to try and relieve the pain with opiates, I'd go back into that downward spiral I didn't want to go back to.

Sure enough, I talked with my doctor and he understood, and he said it could be used to help my back. However, I would only use it when the pain was truly unbearable and when I did take it, that would be one of my doses for the day (I split up the 1.5 into 3 halves; morning, noon, and night). So if my back is bothering me, then it is time for me to take my dose. If I've taken it already, I'll try to get through it, or take a Bayer Back and Body.

In conclusion, it seems as if it depends on the doctor who is prescribing the suboxone. Keep in mind, I have a doctor who isn't as difficult as some I've read about, so he knows that I'm not seeking a high or using my injury as a means to go back to addiction. I hope this helps in some small way!


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2014 8:54 am 
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Hi everyone. I'm brand new here. Just started Suboxone on Wednesday so I guess this is day 4 for me. I have issues with chronic pain due to migraines and disc degeneration in my back. I had gotten to a point in my life where i thought that I would not be able to function on a daily basis without pain meds. I work full time, I'm a wife, and a mother and I'm in pain every day- some days I can function but some days I could barely get out of bed. Anyways, the pain meds became a problem and I got to a point where I didn't want to live my life like that anymore. I've had so much fear and worry though about the pain. It's not just about breaking an addiction to the meds. My biggest fear has been, how the hell do I manage my pain?? My pain management doctor has high hopes for the suboxone and the research I've done (although admittedly it's been minimal) suggests that suboxone will help.
Like I said I'm on day 4 and so far, I feel pretty damn great. Best of all, I've had no cravings. No physical ones for sure. I've had a few brief mental distractions but have snapped back really fast. Physically, I have ZERO withdrawals which has been a damn godsend, especially because my body would usually in constant and overwhelming pain and discomfort at this point from the withdrawals. I've had a few headaches and my back has hurt a few times but as long as I've taken the suboxone it's been very manageable.
At this point, I am very hopeful that Suboxone will be what I need. I'm still trying to figure out some of the dosing issues. I need to talk to my doctor further in more detail about when to take it and how much. I'm unclear what to do if I do get a bad headache or backache. Does anyone else with chronic pain issues know? Has anyone else been advised by their doctor? Also, I have noticed that at times I get a little bit of the sensation of a 'head high' from the suboxone. It's brief and only some of the time. From what I'm reading online, that's normal, but I'm wondering what other peoples experiences has been. Does that go away once I get used the medication??
Thank you everyone!


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2014 2:00 pm 
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Hi Palmer and welcome to the forum! I do have some suggestions, but I'm really short on time right now. I will get back to you tonight unless someone beats me to it!

If you aren't getting many responses on this older thread, feel free to start a new thread in Introductions or in this same section. You're more likely to get some traffic with a new thread. I'll be back with you later!

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PostPosted: Sun May 25, 2014 6:37 pm 
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Hi Palmer,
Still looking for info?


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PostPosted: Sun May 25, 2014 6:58 pm 
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See if you can switch to Subutex. I got something similar to that when I took Subxone and I haven't gotten it since taking Subutex. They have the same ingredient, buprenorphine, but the Subutex doesn't have the naxalone. I was very hypersensitive to the naxalone.

palmer123 wrote:
Hi everyone. I'm brand new here. Just started Suboxone on Wednesday so I guess this is day 4 for me. I have issues with chronic pain due to migraines and disc degeneration in my back. I had gotten to a point in my life where i thought that I would not be able to function on a daily basis without pain meds. I work full time, I'm a wife, and a mother and I'm in pain every day- some days I can function but some days I could barely get out of bed. Anyways, the pain meds became a problem and I got to a point where I didn't want to live my life like that anymore. I've had so much fear and worry though about the pain. It's not just about breaking an addiction to the meds. My biggest fear has been, how the hell do I manage my pain?? My pain management doctor has high hopes for the suboxone and the research I've done (although admittedly it's been minimal) suggests that suboxone will help.
Like I said I'm on day 4 and so far, I feel pretty damn great. Best of all, I've had no cravings. No physical ones for sure. I've had a few brief mental distractions but have snapped back really fast. Physically, I have ZERO withdrawals which has been a damn godsend, especially because my body would usually in constant and overwhelming pain and discomfort at this point from the withdrawals. I've had a few headaches and my back has hurt a few times but as long as I've taken the suboxone it's been very manageable.
At this point, I am very hopeful that Suboxone will be what I need. I'm still trying to figure out some of the dosing issues. I need to talk to my doctor further in more detail about when to take it and how much. I'm unclear what to do if I do get a bad headache or backache. Does anyone else with chronic pain issues know? Has anyone else been advised by their doctor? Also, I have noticed that at times I get a little bit of the sensation of a 'head high' from the suboxone. It's brief and only some of the time. From what I'm reading online, that's normal, but I'm wondering what other peoples experiences has been. Does that go away once I get used the medication??
Thank you everyone!


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2014 9:41 pm 
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Hello. I too take Suboxone for chronic pain. I've had two neck fusions and was on OxyContin for 4 years. I was miserable. I wasn't able to be productive at all. It was all I could do to make it to work. My entire off time was spent in bed.

Then my pain doc put me on Suboxone. I take two 4mg tablets once a day, and almost zero pain. Not only that, but I have my life back. I started dating again shortly after I was put on Suboxone 15 months ago. Three months later, I met my current wife.

I work out regularly, and feel better than I have in many years.

I'm just angry that I wasn't put on this drug in the first place. It's much better for chronic pain than regular opiates.

I don't know what to tell you about the stomach problems. I never had any issues with Suboxone upsetting my stomach.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2014 12:17 pm 
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I take 2 2mg white tablets 4x per day and I couldnt be happier with my level of pain control. It took a little experimenting, but what was crucial was dividing up the doses to no more than every 4 hrs, no less than every 6hrs. And for me anyways, the 2mg actavis brand tablets were necessary. Others wore off to quickly and breaking tabs seemed to give me an unpredictable dose no matter how perfectly I split them. So give my way a try.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2014 11:01 pm 
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Hi neo. I'm on suboxone for chronic pain as well (sole purpose) although after reading this forum for a couple days I'm amazed at all the people it has helped, it's truly inspirational to hear all these positive things. I'm prescribed 8mg (4mg 2x a day) and so far it's been a solid dose for relief. I never experienced the nausea though. What I do know though is once you get stabilized it's a great medicine for the pain. Good luck! Any questions let me know


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 24, 2014 4:21 pm 
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Hello,

I took suboxone for 8 years for chronic pain. It worked, but the problem it created was not being able to go to the bathroom. I had to take laxatives overtime I wanted to go to the bathroom.

Realizing I could not live like this I decided to get off suboxone. I was taking 12mg's a day, 4mg's 3 times per day for 8 years.

So I started a slow taper, cutting 1mg off every two weeks until I got down to 1 mg, then I cut that in half and did that for two weeks. Then I started taking .5mg every other day for two weeks, and then every 3 days for two weeks, and so on until I was down to zero. I thought that my withdrawals would be limited.

That was on July 24th, 2014 and as of today I still have bad withdrawal symptoms, like restless leg, bad headaches, can't sleep, feeling of desperation, like this will never end. I go to bed at 11pm and take ambien, which used to keep me asleep for 8 hours, Now I wake up at 2am-3am every night. It is a nightmare. I wish I would have never started this drug.

I got on it because I became addicted to every other pain med that is prescribed and they always made me need more than what was prescribed. So I went on Suboxone. It helped me for the pain, but caused my intestines to basically go to sleep.

Now I am told I have P.A.W.S. ( Post Accute Withdrawal Syndrome ) which just means my withdrawals are worse and will last longer due to the duration I took Suboxone.

So with my experience I would warn anyone who wants to take this drug long-term and know that if you want to get off it is not easy. If you think you would just stay on it for the rest of your life, there will also be a price to pay. My insides were so full of poop, that I was worried about becoming impacted or blocked which would require surgery. So that is why I decided in July I would end this roller coaster and get off.

That was 3 months ago and I am still going through bad withdrawals. I take Gabapentin to try to help with the restless leg syndrome, but it doesn't fully stop them. I took two weeks off from work in hopes of being done with the withdrawals when I got down to zero subs, and that vacation turned into unemployment because I was not able to return.

I just want to caution anyone who is contemplating using Suboxone. I have heard that it is one of the hardest to get off of, and now I understand why.

Hope this helps anyone.

Shon

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 24, 2014 4:48 pm 
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It's true that suboxone is challenging to come off for many people. That's why we suggest that folks do a long, slow, taper before going off completely. We have plenty of success stories about people coming off and doing well, but it's also been hard for many folks.

It is too bad that constipation was such an issue for you! Otherwise the suboxone seemed to be a good medication for your needs. The ceiling on tolerance is an important attribute for many of us. I have some constipation too, so I had to increase my water intake and occasionally take stool softeners.

It is important for people to weigh potential side effects against what they need suboxone for. Unfortunately, for us addicts, death and destruction is the side effect of not taking sub or methadone.

I have heard from people who tapered off sub that the PAWS eventually goes away. And PAWS is a result of opiate addiction, not of taking sub in particular. You easily could have PAWS from the previous opiate medication you were addicted to. Some people are lucky and never develop it, but others do.

Good luck! I hope that your negative symptoms decrease and that you can feel closer to normal soon.

Amy

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 24, 2014 5:13 pm 
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Amy-Work In Progress wrote:
It's true that suboxone is challenging to come off for many people. That's why we suggest that folks do a long, slow, taper before going off completely. We have plenty of success stories about people coming off and doing well, but it's also been hard for many folks.

It is too bad that constipation was such an issue for you! Otherwise the suboxone seemed to be a good medication for your needs. The ceiling on tolerance is an important attribute for many of us. I have some constipation too, so I had to increase my water intake and occasionally take stool softeners.

It is important for people to weigh potential side effects against what they need suboxone for. Unfortunately, for us addicts, death and destruction is the side effect of not taking sub or methadone.

I have heard from people who tapered off sub that the PAWS eventually goes away. And PAWS is a result of opiate addiction, not of taking sub in particular. You easily could have PAWS from the previous opiate medication you were addicted to. Some people are lucky and never develop it, but others do.

Good luck! I hope that your negative symptoms decrease and that you can feel closer to normal soon.

Amy


Thank you for your reply. The previous opiates I was addicted to had been stopped for about a year before I started taking the subs for the chronic pain. I had trouble finding a doctor who would give me Norco 10/325 for pain management. It took me a while to find the psychologist who would let me have the subs for pain management. I was great for the first 5 years I was on the subs, but like I said I developed really bad constipation and tried drinking more water and exercising, but still could only manage to go to the bathroom about once a week, sometimes a week and a half.

I only warn those who want to use it for pain management. I myself would have rather dealt with the back pain, then have to go through this. I just hope this will be over sooner than later.

I understand why people turn to this for addiction reasons. If it weren't for the constipation and the costs of buying the script and doctor costs because a lack of insurance, I would probably still be on it because it worked for my pain.

But in my case, I have learned that substituting one drug for another isn't the answer either. I feel for people who are stuck in the never ending cycle of drugs. It's a horrible place to be. I am glad I stopped, but the price I am paying now doesn't make it worth it. It's like the old saying "If I knew then, what I know now" I would have never gotten started with any of these prescription drugs.

Maybe it's just me, but the subs have been much harder to get over than the hydrocodones. Back then I usually was OK after 2 weeks or so. I don't drink alcohol, never have.

Again thanks for the reply. This is a great site, I wish I had found it before I started my process of getting off of subs.

Oh, one last thing, I was wrong in my statement that I started in June. I started the tapering in March at 1mg every few weeks and got serious about cutting it really down in June/July and was fully off of the subs on July 24th. One thing I also noticed while taking the subs is memory problems developed. Not sure if it was because of the subs, but thought I would just mention it.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 26, 2014 2:16 pm 
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Hi drytech and welcome to the forum!

I'm sorry you've had such a hard time getting off of Suboxone. No one can tell which person will have it tough and which ones will say it was a breeze. I've seen posts from both and right in between.

All I can say is, stick with it or it will all have been in vain. The PAWS will go away eventually. Some say it can take up to a year to feel completely normal again. Once again, everyone is different.

You can try: "Dopamine agonists: These are most often the first medicines used to treat RLS. These drugs, including Mirapex (pramipexole), Neupro (rotigotine), and Requip (ropinirole), act like the neurotransmitter dopamine in the brain. Side effects include daytime sleepiness, nausea, and lightheadedness." (pulled from Google)

BTW, I removed your link attached as a signature. The only links we allow are for recovery sites unless you've received approval from a moderator. Meaning, some may want to post some fun stuff in the Misc. section. It really depends on what it is. Us mods will discuss it and make a decision.

PM me if you have any questions,

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 05, 2015 2:37 pm 
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yes, i take for chronic pain and i split 4mg morning and 4mg night- works great- better than taking pain meds and there getting very strict about pills. i have fibermyalga works great but i have anxiety so i take amitrpiline to sleep have a great day wenny


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