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PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 10:35 pm 
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As some of you know I had some legal troubles I battled with. I was arrested for DUI and two weeks later I was later arrested for posession of a controlled substance (Originally 15 Hydrocodone 10/325 which later only turned out to be five since the arresting Officer took ten for himself) and possession of a dangerous drug (Soma...Which my drug dealer would give you to you free for whatever amount of Vicodin you bought). The Drug charges were dropped in favor of them just prosecuting me on the DUI. I was sentenced to 15 months probation with abunch of conditions. I basically could not drive, I had to attend 100+ N/A meetings, community service.

Also, a out patient rehab facility which at minimum cost 2,000 dollars which you had to pay for, no exceptions. I floated by on probation for about 10 months (Using the whole time, I even failed for opiates twice and I said I had a prescription which they never bothered to verify) and eventually went to jail for 3 weeks instead since I could not keep up with the 200 dollars a month fee, along with going to the rehab. Aside from all of that I find it redundant. They group all addictions into one. Weather you're in trouble for alcohol, abusing pot, huffing glue, or banging H. With all of the research that has been done on addiction and all of the advancements made why are states still so barbaric when it comes to "treatment." Sending an addicts to NA meetings isn't going to do anything if they are not ready to quit. If anything, all I gained from it was drug connects. I am not bashing N/A but someone who goes to N/A has to be ready to commit to something and if you aren't, like a lot of the people forced to go there then all it is doing is putting people's recovery in danger.

I understand Probation is meant to be a punishment for your crime but at the same time, there needs to be a learning process, some education involved. The biggest tool you can use on the "war against drugs" is educating addicts, counselors, parents, the whole nation. I know, we are in a huge financial crisis, but just dropping the war on drugs would save billions. People are going to use drugs no matter what. Across the Atlantic where drug laws are less strict or even legal the percent of people who use drugs are less per capita then here.

(Below is a drug usage chart comparison of the United States and The Netherlands from 2001...I couldn't find a more recent one.)
http://www.drugwarfacts.org/cms/node/67

So...what do you think is more helpful on the battle against addiction..Punishment or Education?


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 11:05 pm 
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Education, unless you are diverting drugs, selling drugs, or your diversion/selling leads to a death.

I had this friend who had a daughter who forged a prescription, in 6 or 7 counties! I think she got 4 years in the slammer. I think she knew what she was doing was wrong and that deserves some sort of punishment. I mean jeez!

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 12:15 am 
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James: Are you saying that if she would have bought the drugs on the street it would have been different, but because she bought them at a pharamacy (using a forgery) she deserves jail? I guess I'm not seeing the difference - other than the source. Help me understand.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 9:35 am 
I need some clarification also Jamez. Maybe I'm not reading it right. Are you saying that those who 'divert' drugs need to go to jail? If so....I would have to go to jail and I think Dr. Junig would have to also. What I did in active addiction was divert (steal) drugs from the hospital that employed me. I did not divert drugs from my patients. Had I done that I may not have gotten caught because everything I took would have been documented as having gone to the patient. Thankfully, I had enough of my moral fiber left that I didn't let my patients suffer so I could have their drugs. But what I did was horrendously wrong. No doubt about it. I stole drugs, plain and simple. I put not only myself at risk, but the hospital, my patients, and my coworkers as well. I am deeply ashamed of it. This is a nasty disease which causes a normally sane, intelligent, and good person to do things they would never dream of doing. I am very fortunate that I didn't get arrested. Some of the friends I made while in the Peer Assistance Program were arrested and charged. Believe me, I worried for a long time that it would happen to me. Now that it's been a year and a half, I don't worry as much, but still...a very real fear.
From all I can see, doctors and nurses who divert drugs are punished, whether they go to jail or not. To the credit of the licensing boards, I do think their intentions are good. I believe their number one priority is to protect the public (as it should be.) Beyond that, I believe their intent is to educate and rehabilitate. I'm just not sure they go about it in the best way at this point. Every addict does not respond or recover well with the standard '90 in 90' NA/AA meetings, outpatient treatment programs, etc. Treatment plans should be made on a case-by-case basis. I don't know....there are positive strides being made in the treatment of addicts, I do believe that. But there's still a lot of improvement that needs to be made. To be honest, at this time, I feel mostly good about my decision to surrender my license and get out of the Peer Assistance Program. I think I took all from their idea of rehabilitation that I could and it did help me. But I don't think it would be best for me to work in the clinical setting ever again, especially if I wouldn't be allowed to be on Suboxone. It breaks my heart to pieces sometimes, but I cannot see myself drawing up a syringe full of Demerol or Fentanyl without wanting to take some for myself.
Really, I feel I've paid enough. I deserved to loose a lot and I did. However, I was sick and if you understand the disease of addiction, you know the disease made me powerless.
To answer the original question Mayun.....I think it's a measure of both. There has to be a measure of punishment as we all must be accountable for our actions. But education and rehabilitation should be the focus. The idea of court-, or in my case, licensing board-mandated drug counseling, meetings, etc is great in theory. But in practice, it is too one-size-fits-all. At least that's my opinion.
I do agree that incarceration is in order for drug activity that leads to a death and I believe it's in order for distributing (I'm not necessarily talking about the dude or gal that 'sells' a couple of their vic on the street. I'm talking about the bigger time dealers.) Anyway, don't know much....just my opinions. Maybe I misunderstood, Jamez. I hope so.....I sure wouldn't want to be sitting in jail right now. I don't think that would have served anyone's best interest.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 10:38 am 
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It's interesting you should bring this up, Mayun, because on another thread recently I learned something about probation/being busted in the UK (from Sneaky Elephant).
Their's is still a one-size-fits-all, but at least there they offer Suboxone as an option for treatment. Whereas here I've heard about people being forced off their Suboxone by their probation officer.

I think the basis of good rehabilitation is education and should be done on a case-by-case basis. But with the "war on drugs" there are so many people going thru the system that they simply don't have the resources to do it individually.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 9:10 pm 
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Its hard to explain what I mean. I guess 'Diverting Drugs' wasn't the best choice of words.

'Diverting Drugs' I mean you are getting a script for oxycontin, and promptly selling all of them, leading to someone overdosing and dying. Don't you think that deserves some sort of punishment? Like in 'distribution' amounts, not 'personal use' amounts. How the hell do you measure it though?

I didn't mean a doctor taking a little off the top, or a pharmacy tech taking a few pills, the nurse etc. We'd probably all be in jail then wouldn't we.

The problem is, how do you determine someone who is desperate as compared someone who is doing it for criminal intent?

In Florida, I read that if you are in possession of a small amount of oxycontin illegally, its a mandatory 4 years?! Come on! Isn't that a little extreme?

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 9:19 pm 
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The problem, and including my statement, it seems all-inclusive. 'Divert' could mean 1 pill, 0.01mg of morphine could be 'diversion' if it is stolen.

I think I meant more 'selling'. That just bothers me. My dad would probably be ALIVE if one of my FRIENDS didn't sell him cocaine, which furthered his psychosis which led to his suicide. I bought some too, for the police :)

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 9:37 pm 
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I guess what you mean is people who aren't addicts who are abusing the system to then contribute to the addicts? It's kind of a fine line since but I understand in a sense what you are talking about...Although, you have your sellers and you have your buyers, that how it works and thats how it always will work. In Texas there is pain clinics everywhere in the Houston Area...We Lived in Austin so it was only a few hour drive...I mean, there would be a doctor attached to a pharmacy pretty much. Anyways, my main dealer was a person who went there and got a boatload of pills then sold to us, i mean they were addicts as well but they didn't need them for any medical purposes.

On a side note, Oxy Contin is becoming an epidemic now...I mean, it's been around forever but now that it's being seen so frequently in Suburban High schools and kids are overdosing it's a big deal, yet Heroin has been around forever is typically in urban area's and yet it garners no attention. Apparently a lot of pharmacies are afraid of carrying OxyContin/OxyCodone/ETC in fear of being robbed. The prices jumped 100% last year and hence the street prices have jumped so high...

I remember when I was first using I could buy Vicodins for 2-3 dollars, when I stopped they sky rocketed up to 7 dollars. I could get 80 MG Oxy for 20 dollars and now there up to 80 dollar plus. I know it's a bit off topic but I'm just making a point that it is more expensive than EVER to be an addict. Maybe it's a good thing since people will stop...But I doubt it, it's just going to lead to more crime than ever to support there increasingly expensive habits. I never really kept a tab on my habit when it was in full swing but I would have to say I was spending over $1,500 a month.

Thank god for Subs :-)


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 10:04 pm 
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I much more agree with you now that you have explained yourself Jamez. From what I understand, "Diversion" is the nice word for steeling and/or re-routing drugs to the street. Obviously my feelings on all of this could very well be self-serving. However, I agree with you in that, at least in my mind, selling drugs is a pretty big step beyond using them yourself. So regardless of how the "diversion" occurred, it seems to me that someone who had a financial profit from that diversion is a notch up on the ladder from someone who simply obtained it for their own use. A simple example would be the RN or MD who removes several vials of drug X from the medical cabinet at the hospital and administers those drugs to himself does not rise to the level of the same RN or MD who removes several vials of drug X and sells them, or perhaps even gives them away, to someone on the street - but most certainly sells them. Going one step further, if harm comes to the person that received or purchased those drugs, that ramps things up even higher (in my mind).

Personal use
Giving away or sharing
Selling
Trafficking or moving large amounts
Harm coming to someone given away to or shared
Harm coming to someone who purchased

I also feel that, for whatever reason, someone who is not addicted at the time is more culpable than someone who is. That very well could be rationalization coming in again and I am not sure that I could defend why I think this - I just do. I try very hard not to blame anything that I did in the past on my addiction. I really don't like to just use the fact that I'm an addict as my "get out of jail free" card (as it were). But having been addicted and knowing full well what it can and does do to someone, it really seems to me that someone committing a crime as a result of their addiction is lower on the scale than someone who is not suffering from addiction when they do their drug crime. Perhaps it goes to intent. I think most everyone would agree that the "intent" of an addict in obtaining drugs is quite a bit different than the non-addict (dealer) who obtains drugs.

Let's face it, it really is pretty hard to be a drug addict for any length of time and not have broken some laws at some point in time along the line. Whether it is "doctor shopping", stealing drugs from family or friends, having family or friends willingly "borrow" or give drugs to you, obtaining drugs using a false prescription, buying drugs on the street, obtaining drugs from a supply cabinet as a medical provider - all of these are illegal. I'd also be very willing to bet that just about everyone on this board is guilty of doing at least one of these things somewhere along the line. At the very least, everyone here would have to have ingested a pill of some sort that was not prescribed to them. Hell, I'm pretty sure that most non-addicts have done that at one point or another.

Once again, I may have pulled us a bit off of the topic. Hopefully it has furthered the discussion.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 10:54 pm 
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What's the difference between a doctor who steals and uses for himself or a street dealer who sells to support his habit? Abusing a drug that has your name on the bottle does not make it any better than abusing those from other bottles. I suppose everyone is going to view this through there own moral scope.

Yes dealing drugs is illegal and immoral but the only reason they do it is because people like I (and others on here I'm sure) keep on coming back. They provide a product that we need. I mean, you can't blame them for making money. While there is risk involved, it is an easy job. Everyone has this view of a drug dealer being some hardened gun waving criminal where in a lot of instances it's old grandma's dealing there pain meds since there social security is no longer paying the bills. Is a Grandma who sells her pain meds to keep her lights on any worse than the doctor who is using the medicine cabinet as a candy bowl? Both are illegal and both are morally wrong but both support the same cause...Fueling the addiction express.
(I'm not even kidding about the grandma statement either....I've seen it done on more than one occasion)

I'm not saying I support either, I'm more or less just playing the Devil's advocate here.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 11:17 pm 
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Then again, is robbing a store to steal bread to feed your starving family 'better' than robbing a store to buy cocaine?

It could go on and on.

I have another example of foolish criminal behavior, and you may side with me in a way..

I used to work with a guy (I'm an engineer, he was too). He was very talented. He had alcoholism. No big deal really, it doesn't bother me I feel bad for him more than anything.

Well, we were laid off in 2002, and a week later, he obtained his 7th DUI!

Being his 7th DUI, its certainly a felony, and he was sentenced to 4 years in state prison. A little extreme in a way, but jeez if you're going to drink and drive and get caught 7 times, wouldn't you take the bus?!

He was released from prison a year ago, and out of curiousity, I looked him up (in Wisconsin you can look up anyones criminal history, kind of a invasion of privacy if you ask me, but its cool).

Well, about 6 months ago, he received his 8TH DUI! and a month after that, HIS 9TH DUI!!!!!!!.

He received 5 years in prison for those.

Now this whole thing just puzzles me. I honestly feel so bad for him in a way, and in a way 'good riddance, idiot why did you drive drunk, 9 times?!'.

In this case, I think prison fits. He'll keep doing it until he kills someone.

Now, Story #2:

Picture 3 19 year old boys drinking. One is a gun collector, and owns a semi-automatic rifle. He is taking pictures of the gun, and puts the clip in. He then goes to mix another drink and tells his friends 'Don't touch it!'

Well, he comes back in the room, and his one friend has it pointed at the other friend.

BANG!.. Off goes the brain of one of them as the bullet hits his skull, the television, and the wall behind him.

Condensed version... Shooter 'didn't know it was loaded' and received 6 months in prison, after shooting his best friend.

I am related to gun owner so thats why this one came to mind. What a mess all of this was! It really wasn't his fault.

Do you agree with the sentence?

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 11:20 pm 
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Sorry guys, its way off topic, its just that event was so surreal I love to tell the story.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 11:28 pm 
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I think I whole heartedly agree with donh. In my opinion the difference with someone selling because they are an addict and someone selling for the money is this. Addiction is a disease. The addict does not have his/her rational mind. They need treatment and with proper treatment they can be rehabilitated. The true character of the addict cannot be known until they are out of active addiction. HOWEVER, the person selling the drugs for money and they are NOT an addict has his/her rational mind. They do not have a disease driving their behavior. They know right from wrong and they WATCH themselves harm people every day. That is a DISGUSTING job when you know you are hurting others. If they were caught, what kind of "treatment" could you give them? What would help them to learn their lesson? That person has CHOSEN of sound mind to harm others for their own benefit. Now I don't really care about the small time person who sells their friend 10 vicodin because they don't want their script or who sells their script of oxy because they don't want it. I am talking about the person who forges a prescription or who lies to the physician to get a script and does this repeatedly to get money.

I was offered oxycontin by a friend who was trying to help me because I was in pain all the time. She would take them occasionally but was never addicted to them. She would take them once or twice a month and that is all. A little niblet. She got them from her boyfriend who got them from this old lady who regularly claimed to be in massive pain to get the drugs to sell and then she could pay all of her bills and whatnot. But since this friend I had was the only person I knew who would even know where to get OC, had she not been willing to sell it to me, I would never have taken it. I wasn't looking when it was offered. To this day I don't know anyone else who had or would have it. I don't have friends in those circles. So when it comes to painkillers, I have to disagree that it is ok for the person selling because the addict will just get it somewhere else if they don't. I wouldn't have. And then my life would be a hell of a lot different right now.

I think my friend crossed a line when she started seeking out other people to get it from and was then selling it to me regularly knowing I was addicted. I remember asking her if she had ever heard of suboxone after I learned about it. She said YES. So the 2 years my life was going down the shitter, she was happy to keep making money off of me knowing that I was ruining my life and she only wanted the money. Do I think she should be in jail? YES!

Do I think the nurse should be in jail? NO. Setmefree needed a rehab program and/or suboxone. I think setmefree sacrificed a lot to get into the program that was right for her. I hope the programs are more individually tailored in the future.

Just my opinion.

Cherie


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 31, 2010 2:57 am 
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Well, it's kind of hard to argue with anyone's personal stories as everyone has had their own experiences. I just don't understand one thing...So, if a dealer is not using but selling to people he/she is bad but if someone is using and also selling on the side to support their habit it's okay? I'm not trying to be rude but that's what I'm kind of getting from this. If you're under the crutch of addiction it's okay since you're not thinking logically....

Also Jamez,
DUI's up until about 10 years ago were barely a slap on the butt...They were not taken seriously at all...Now they put the whole three strikes rule into effect. If anything, he should of received treatment for his condition rather than Prison since it doesn't seem to be working....The whole prison system in general is pretty f'ed if you ask me. Sure, some of them offer education but it's not mandatory. A lot of people in prison have no family, nothing when they get out they go back to the same behavior since that's all prison breeds. If these inmates were MADE to join a rehab program as well be forced to educate themselves I think repeat offenders would decrease dramatically.

61% of felons are repeat offenders...What does that say about the prison system?


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 31, 2010 7:41 am 
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To answer your question, none of it is ok, but YES. In my opinion, the addict who is selling was first a victim and now they are selling to maintain an addiction. The person who isn't an addict is just plain selfish.

Don't get me wrong, I don't think my opinion has a whole ton of rationality behind it. I should probably think both people should be equally responsible and be held equallay accountable for the same crime. But I don't. Clearly I have a bias since I am a former drug addict.

With that being said...I also don't believe in long sentences for drug crimes either. I actually loathe our criminal system because it is based on punishment and not rehabilitation. Statistically most people are worse off getting out of prison than when they went in. Most people don't need 10 years in prison to decide selling drugs isn't worth it. I would be fine with a short jail term and house arrest in most cases. In my opinion, jail ought to be reserves for violent crimes and majr offenses. I don't consider drugs a major offense in most cases.

Just my opinions.

Cherie


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 31, 2010 10:07 am 
I'm with Jackcrack. Maybe I'm wrong....but I do see a big difference between an addict's behavior in active addiction versus a nonaddict selling drugs purely for profit. Big difference! I think someone said something on this thread about it not being that big a deal.....that it's easy money for the dealer, and 'we' are gonna get drugs somehow or another anyway. I just shook my head at that one. That mentality just doesn't sit well with me. To take it a step further.....So, say, some punk sees how "easy" it is to collect money for a sick kid and decides that if us "softies" are stupid enough to donate, they'll just go ahead and take our money when there really is no sick kid. Is that not a big deal either? In my opinion....there is clearly criminal intent and complete disregard the safety and welfare of others by someone who is dealing drugs who isn't on drugs themselves. Sorry, no question in mind....they deserve and need to be punished. I am real tired of the whole "let's find an easy way to make money" thing anyway. Go to school and/or get a damn real job and make some legit money. "Easy money" is just not an excuse that flies with me.
I know with everything in me, that if not for my addiction, I would never have broken the law. Get my addiction into remission and I will not break the law again. I do not feel the same is true in the other cases. Don't get me wrong....I am all about accountability (addiction or no addiction.) There is a price that must be paid when you've committed illegal acts. It's a blurry line to say the least and honestly, I don't where the line should be drawn. We all develop our opinions based on our own experiences and no doubt, some it is self-serving. But there are some things still that to me are pretty cut and dried.
Just my opinion. This is an interesting conversation. Hey, I did want to add.....I have a question posted on a nursing forum asking if anyone out there knows of Suboxone being allowed in a state's BON diversion program. Guess what? I've gotten a few responses that say...."Yes" a couple nurses in Florida have been allowed to be on Sub in the program (I'm not sure if they're being allowed to work in a clinical setting though) and another person from another state is on Sub (can't remember off hand what state right now) Anyway...to me that is rather encouraging.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 31, 2010 8:14 pm 
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I believe yo are referring to me when you are saying "It's not big deal." and I never said that, I was merely playing Devil's Advocate to promote more conversation.

It seems there is a double edged sword here...We don't want people to judge us for our addictions yet we want an exception for doing criminal activity. Yes, we are sick but at the same time we're still us and we can control what we're doing, yet we choose not too. A lot of drug dealers learn to separate business and personal relationships. Yes, they are selling us a product that is killing us but at the same time they're not forcing it down out throat, up our nose or in your veins. In most cases we approach them. More people die every year from heart disease in the united states than anything else yet they still go to the drive thru everyday, shoving big macs down their gullets. Do they know they have a problem? Sure...Does McDonalds know their product is fattening and promotes an unhealthy lifestyle? Sure. But when it comes down to it all business people want to see is profit, Whether they are a girl scout, A McDonalds executive, or a drug dealer.

I'm not advocating dealing drugs, I'm merely looking at it from both sides.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 31, 2010 9:14 pm 
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mayunholdup wrote:
Well, it's kind of hard to argue with anyone's personal stories as everyone has had their own experiences. I just don't understand one thing...So, if a dealer is not using but selling to people he/she is bad but if someone is using and also selling on the side to support their habit it's okay? I'm not trying to be rude but that's what I'm kind of getting from this. If you're under the crutch of addiction it's okay since you're not thinking logically....

Also Jamez,
DUI's up until about 10 years ago were barely a slap on the butt...They were not taken seriously at all...Now they put the whole three strikes rule into effect. If anything, he should of received treatment for his condition rather than Prison since it doesn't seem to be working....The whole prison system in general is pretty f'ed if you ask me. Sure, some of them offer education but it's not mandatory. A lot of people in prison have no family, nothing when they get out they go back to the same behavior since that's all prison breeds. If these inmates were MADE to join a rehab program as well be forced to educate themselves I think repeat offenders would decrease dramatically.

61% of felons are repeat offenders...What does that say about the prison system?


You're right. Prison doesn't work. But with my friend and his 9 DUI's, he sort of IS a danger to society in a way wouldn't you agree?

The real trouble with him is that he just doesn't stop. I'm sure he has been mandated treatment many times, and he just doesn't get it. Its almost proof that it has to be a disease.

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 31, 2010 10:45 pm 
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Holdup: Are you aware of the choice of words that you have been using? I actually typed out a comment yesterday and then figured that perhaps you just grabbed a word and really didn't mean what you said when you stated:

"I mean, you can't blame them for making money. While there is risk involved, it is an easy job."

It really caught me that you called dealing drugs a "job". Really? A job? Then, today's post contained this:

"Yes, they are selling us a product that is killing us..."

A product? Really? The drug dealer's "job" is selling us a "product"? I guess I just don't see it that way at all. When talking about the pharmacist selling oxy this or hydro that at Wal-Mart - yeah, I'll agree that is someone doing a "job" selling us a "product" but when it comes to the drug dealer on the street, it's just a lot different for me.

Now, I may be all twisted and biased about this as well. Perhaps I am. I just personally look at "intent" and "endangerment" The doctor or nurse who steals from the cabinet for personal use has a different intent and endangers him or herself versus the guy who obtains the same drugs from the same place with the purpose of providing them to a third party for money and endangers that person. Certainly, no matter who we are talking about, if they are driving around in public or taking care of patients, they are endangering others as well.

Who knows? It may all be the same and I just may be fooling myself here. I guess for me the line gets crossed when the drug addict starts to involve or endanger others besides himself.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 31, 2010 11:02 pm 
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I really, really wanted to stay out of this, but I just can't let this go without explaining how I feel about it. And by the way, it does not concern me in the least what anyone thinks about my opinion on the subject. This is what I think.

If an individual is selling drugs to feed their addiction, that's wrong, but it is a reason. It's called an extenuating circumstance. If someone who does not have an addiction is selling drugs to make a living instead of finding honest work - particularly if they know firsthand just how much damage drug addiction causes - then they are nothing more than a parasitic lowlife who deserves every minute of jail time that they get.

You can rationalize all you want, but those little girlscouts who go door to door selling cookies are NOT just like drug dealers... in no way, shape, or form. They're just little girls selling cookies. If you can't see the difference between the two, and continue to think that your problems are the fault of the cops, the prison system, or your mommy and daddy, then I have little doubt that you will spend much of your life in and out of jail.

You can NOT force someone to take a class to better themselves and expect them to get a damn thing out of it. Just like you can't force someone to address their addiction issues... they have to WANT to take care of their problems.

And as far as drunk drivers go... Can you imagine someone having to come to your home to tell you that a drunk driver killed your wife, sister, brother, parent, or anyone that you care deeply for? It's one of the worst things that you'll ever see, take my word for it. It's something that you'd wish you could forget, but something that you'll always remember. Try to imagine how you would feel if you found out that the person that killed your loved one had been caught time after time after time driving drunk, but was never put away. You'd be mad as hell!

You, and only you, are responsible for your actions.

That's how I feel!


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Fond Du Lac Psychiatry
Dr. Jeffrey Junig, M.D., Ph.D.

  • Board Certified Psychiatrist
  • Asst Clinical Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin

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