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 Post subject: About Suboxone
PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2012 11:04 am 
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I got this about suboxone.Check this whether I am correct:
buprenorphine is indicated for the treatment of moderate to severe chronic pain (pain that has outlasted its use to prevent injury and after three months) or for peri-operative analgesiaBuprenorphine (Subutex) itself binds more strongly to receptors in the brain than do other opioids, making it more difficult for opioids (or opiates) to react when buprenorphine is in the system. The blockade effect also has the result of blocking endogenous endorphins from binding to receptors, which can lead to psychological alterations in mood and mental capacity. This can cause cognitive and memory deficiencies via blockade of the reward system, which is pertinent to memory formation and normal mental function. [Citation Needed]


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 Post subject: Re: About Suboxone
PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2013 6:53 am 
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I was so excited I found this , until I realized its almost two years old :C
Oh, well , I have been researching this drug of which I've been battling throughout maintenance.. and came across this very exact information on Wiki!!
I'm glad i'm not the only one, whose kinda like going "duhh put two and two together" at my curious curious self! I need to find knowledge on this!!
Immediately I search for more information on this interesting piece of "fact" , and alas I can't find much of anything. I was hoping maybe somebody else has something to say about this drug not only blocking our opiate receptors but thus our endorphins.


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 Post subject: Re: About Suboxone
PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2013 7:54 am 
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Just to clarify....ANY opiate will cause this. Not just buprenorphine.

There is a thread where Dr. J recently addressed and explains the process of the endorphine receptors healing themselves. Check out this thread and go to his post at the bottom for his post. :D

post73691.html#p73691

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 Post subject: Re: About Suboxone
PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2013 8:18 am 
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I've done quite a bit of extensive "research"...on Suboxone, but I put research in quotations because my learning has been done using the internet. But, in my searching, I've found quite a bit of useful information, but most of it is localized to sites like NAABT.org, which are very useful in learning how Suboxone works.

For the most part, I'll try to sum it up:

Before introducing short-acting/long-acting opiates to the brain, it releases its own dopamine at regular intervals, which makes you feel pleasure/reward. The most common things that cause a flood of dopamine are what the brain uses for basic human survival...those are: food, and sex. The most basic instinct to insure the brain keeps on living, something that is so hard-wired into all of us, that we don't even realize it. When you take short-acting opiates for extended periods of time, (lortab, percocet, percodan, lorcet, fioricet, vicodin, etc), the brain is being flooded with dopamine that doesn't have anywhere to go. Normally, when dopamine is released naturally, the receptors are in place in the brain for that dopamine to bind to...but with opiates, the period of time taking them actually causes the brain to create new receptors for all the dopamine that is present (both the natural, and the dopamine released as a result of opiates).
After a while, the brain says "hey, there's too much of this stuff floating around in here" and starts to shut-down normal dopamine releasing capability. So the brain is expecting the synthetic dopamine to be there, and if that synthetic is taken away (you stop taking opiates), the brain doesn't have the natural dopamine present to cover the receptors. This is what is felt with withdrawals from short-acting opiates. The more we're used to taking, the less dopamine our brain creates on it's own...and the more synthetic we have to take in order to just feel "normal". If we don't take that amount, our brain tells us "hey, something is wrong, you need more"....and the urge becomes more than just an urge. Its becomes a natural, human instinct to do whatever you have to do in order to make sure you have that pill/opiate in your system.

So, then we introduce buprenorphine to the picture...or better known as, Suboxone. When you bring Suboxone in, you should be in withdrawals..meaning the brain should be hungering for dopamine levels to return to normal, but none is present (or very small amounts)...otherwise known as being 'dope sick'. The Suboxone is brought in, and the receptors are saturated by the buprenorphine, but it doesn't cause a flooding of dopamine as with short-acting opiates. It just covers those receptors and keeps any other opiate from attaching to them due to the higher binding affinity..so, that makes the brain say "I got enough", and you don't feel those withdrawal symptoms, and you don't feel that subhuman urge/impulse to 'score'...and you start to become more productive...because focus returns to job/family/relationships/financial obligation/etc, all the things that are normally pushed aside for an opiate addict in the throws of a hellish landslide on painkillers/heroin.
The reason more opiates are required to get the same effect is because the brain, over time, gradually shuts down the natural release of dopamine. It's not instant on, instant off...so for a while, you can still take enough to feel a little "buzz"...but after a while, you're just chasing a high that you won't ever feel anymore...because the brain has little, to none (dopamine) being released, and you need every bit of the opiate you take in order to feel normal. When buprenorphine saturates the receptors, it only takes a certain amount, and that amount never changes...the same amount it takes today, will be the same amount it takes 2 years from now...so over time, you don't need to take more to stave off the withdrawals...and it all is related to the affinity Suboxone has for the mu-opioid receptor...(mu is usually spelled with the Greek letters for "m" and "u").

Its said when you can spout that off in a conversation like you're talking about your favorite football team...but over time, I've read so much that I've gotten to a point where I'm forgetting things I've read about Suboxone. Spending every day at home with a baby ...I have plenty of bored time, so I try to educate myself. Or, argue with people that spread the lies about Suboxone, God knows there are plenty of them around.

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October 8, 2013

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Fond Du Lac Psychiatry
Dr. Jeffrey Junig, M.D., Ph.D.

  • Board Certified Psychiatrist
  • Asst Clinical Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin

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